Calcium from food sources : So all in all I... - Bone Health

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Calcium from food sources

irishlass-1
irishlass-1

So all in all I would like to ensure I am getting as much calcium as poss from food sources. At the minute I take two Adcal in the morning and two in the evening

After looking into it further I wonder if I would cut down to one at each time, or none at all. But then I would be worried I wasn’t getting enough calcium. How do you know your diet is good enough! I take sesame seeds, almonds, green leafy veg, milk kefir, prunes.

I have also ordered Vitamin K supplements and magnesium. (Both good quality easily absorbed)

Would be very grateful for opinions.

21 Replies
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You may find this link helpful in finding out how much calcium you need per day and if you are getting enough from diet alone: theros.org.uk/information-a...

irishlass-1
irishlass-1
in reply to Kaarina

Thanks Kaarina, I’m not a fan of the NHS dietary advice as I think it’s outdated. I notice it’s still talking about the Eatwell Guide and basing your diet around potatoes, rice and pasta - which they were 25 years ago. Don’t mention wholewheat pasta / brown rice / fermented food groups or much in the way of recent research.

beenard
beenard
in reply to irishlass-1

If you click on calcium on the ROS .org uk it will come up with dairy foods and also click on link on that page for calculater rich food chooser

I was prescribed one Adcal a day by my GP.

Here's a useful calcium calculator: cgem.ed.ac.uk/research/rheu... It's recommended to get as much calcium as possible from food and only supplement to make up any shortfall. If you're not taking osteoporosis meds, you probably only need 700mg calcium daily (as per the calculator), though I have been told by a consultant recently that 800-1000mg is better. You probably don't need a calcium supplement at all.

cocoa
cocoa
in reply to Met00

This is very helpful.

A while back I cut out cheese because of cholesterol being on the high side. Since being diagnosed with osteopenia I have reintroduced it but it disagrees with me.

It seems that it is swings and roundabouts … a juggling act to get things right.

Met00
Met00
in reply to cocoa

Can you eat yoghourt and kefir?

cocoa
cocoa
in reply to Met00

I eat loads of yoghurt …. have not tried kefir but will try it … so many intolerances make life difficult.

Met00
Met00
in reply to cocoa

If you're OK with yoghourt, you probably are with kefir too.

Margo
Margo
in reply to cocoa

Did you find cutting back on cheese improved your cholesterol reading cocoa ? I am mad about cheese, eat a lot of it and have very high cholesterol readings.

cocoa
cocoa
in reply to Margo

Difficult to know … I had my cholesterol checked every year until , unfortunately, my GP practice closed and my new GP will not monitor it.

As I was concerned when I received my diagnosis of osteopenia, knowing I should increase calcium intake, I had a test done privately recently and the reading had gone down .

I am now going to get it checked yearly privately.

irishlass-1
irishlass-1
in reply to cocoa

Cocoa do you mean you get a dexa scan privately?

cocoa
cocoa
in reply to irishlass-1

No, I had a cholesterol blood test privately as my GP will only test every 5 years

karmel
karmel
in reply to cocoa

I have exactly the same problem as you. I was diagnosed as having high cholesterol and just given a low fat diet to follow - (even though I was already on a low fodmap diet to help my IBS). When I asked the doctor about a calcium supplement as I couldn't eat dairy products, she said she didn't know how much dairy produce I could eat but I could have cheese once a month - but couldn't tell me how much. I don't tolerate well dairy produce now and according to the doctor I could eat green vegetables for calcium. Doctors don't seem to understand that if food isn't very palatable, if you are like me, you don't want to eat it. It really is a viscous circle you know you need to eat well for your health but you have to restrict what you eat.

Nanaedake
Nanaedake
in reply to karmel

Many types of tofu are fortified with calcium. Tofu is eaten by lots of Asian and Far Eastern people without any problems. Many Asian people are intolerant of dairy products. Fish with bones such as tinned salmon with the bones will add calcium to your diet.

karmel
karmel
in reply to Nanaedake

Thanks I have tried Tofu and personally found it very bland needing to be added to dishes that have a lot of flavour. I know that you can get calcium from eating the bones of tinned fish like sardines but I hardly ever eat fish. If I didn't have IBS and could tolerate vegetables and fruits that are high in fructans or polyols , I would be a vegetarian Fortunately, I do like eating a handful of almonds although they aren't low in fat.

irishlass-1
irishlass-1
in reply to karmel

Smoked Tofu is really nice, you can get it in sainsbury's

karmel
karmel
in reply to irishlass-1

Thanks, I might try it - what did you add to irishlass?

irishlass-1
irishlass-1
in reply to karmel

Just some stirfried broccoli with soy sauce as far as I remember! V tasty

Nanaedake
Nanaedake
in reply to karmel

Tofu is not meant to be eaten alone. Add it to a chicken stock with a little rice, mushroom and garlic or onion, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Or use a fish stock or a miso stock for soup and cut it into small cubes and add. Smoked tofu is a delicious alternative as Irishlass says and can be fried together with vegetables and chicken with soy sauce and yoghurt added in at the end. Or use in a risotto dish.

karmel
karmel
in reply to Nanaedake

Thanks for the very handy tips. It was a while ago that I tried it. I remember marinating it and adding it to a stir fry. I'll have another go - as it is fat free.

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