Dr Christianson’s Personalised Thyroid Plan - Thyroid UK

Thyroid UK

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Dr Christianson’s Personalised Thyroid Plan

Yppah
Yppah

Has anyone done this and had success? He claims 70% of people can regain thyroid function. I’d love to not take levo, but is this realistic? Thanks.

45 Replies

I have seen this advertised a few times. I wouldn’t trust the site in any way.Question: How can a totally destroyed thyroid work again?

Answer: It cannot.

It’s why hypothyroid patients have to take replacement hormones for life. A few people with Hashimotos may have flare ups where the thyroid improves for a short period, however over time it will be destroyed.

I find it appears to be a complete scam / con job. Clearly hoping to make lots of money with sales for the plan then books, he also sells supplements and shakes.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Miffie

How do you know he shakes ? Is it because he takes too much of his own rubbish??

greygoose
greygoose in reply to Hidden

lol 🤣🤣🤣

Hidden
Hidden in reply to greygoose

🤣

Miffie
Miffie in reply to Hidden

Love it, must proof read before posting in future 😄😄😄

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Miffie

We need a smile or two Miffie 🤣🤣

Yppah
Yppah in reply to Miffie

Yes, helvella mentions below about him saying could be ideal for those “recently diagnosed”, ie perhaps little to no damage so far. I am really interested in his points re iodine though. Though probably don’t need to pay him £75 for his plan.

Hidden
Hidden

Wouldn’t touch it with a barge pole. These people annoy me more than the doctors who fail us.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

It’s utter garbage

What a complete load of rubbish! Sorry but I would not be following his protocol if you are hypothyroid because you could make yourself very ill!

Yppah I have tried 'not taking levothyroxine' for couple weeks at a time..

From my experience I felt better for a few days and then crashed with high TSH and low Ft4..(as others have)!!

Possibly best not to trust those trying to sell books/alternative supplements/medication etc etc.

Yppah
Yppah in reply to Thyb

Thanks for sharing your experience. I kind of wish I’d never touched the stuff and tried harder with vitamins and getting rid of an old EBV infection. Not averse to medication at all, just wish I’d explored other avenues first. Definitely won’t stop taking it for now, thank you!

helvella
helvellaAdministrator

Almost every website which is trying to sell you something has pages which are about a mile high. They go on and on and on.

In this case, I found the following snippet:

How Does the Thyroid Reset Diet Work?

We now know that thyroid disease is more reversible than previously thought. But we are exposed to more iodine, in higher amounts, than ever before.

Our thyroids need iodine, but too much is a problem! 30 to 40% of American adults are consuming unsafe levels of iodine. Those who can’t tolerate it, get thyroid disease.

If you are among the millions of people with an unsafe iodine intake, that could be why thyroid disease is holding you back. So, The Thyroid Reset Diet may be your answer.

This book is a new approach to the problem. Clinical trials have shown that careful iodine reduction can successfully reverse thyroid disease and eliminate its symptoms.

This healthy diet does not restrict food categories! I created a simple action plan that can help your thyroid heal, and then restore it to good function.

If you were recently diagnosed with hypothyroidism and/or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, there is a good chance that this diet plan could reverse your illness.

drchristianson.com/thyroidr...

So we have loads of people telling us to take Lugol's solution in vast quantities. (For example, Dr Brownstein.) And others, as here, telling us we are already consuming far too much iodine.

Both selling books, etc.

I suspect excess iodine levels are relatively unusual in the UK except in specific groups - people who eat lots of high-iodine food, take amiodarone, etc.

Miffie Hidden SlowDragon Lora7again greygoose

Hidden
Hidden in reply to helvella

Who’s hidden? Is it me?

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Hidden

Yes - but no idea why!

Hidden

Aha! That was old scrumbler. Sorry.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to helvella

I get called everything 😊

greygoose
greygoose in reply to helvella

Well, it's an original approach. But, I still don't think I buy it.

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to greygoose

I think it is junk - and pretty certain it could not be valid in the UK.

Yppah
Yppah in reply to helvella

Thank you. The bit re “recently diagnosed” is probably the key part I take from that. Maybe I am too far down the line. For me, I got a moderate boost in FT3 and FT4 from ditching gluten, dairy and soy, and taking supplements. I had a large dairy intake - 1 or 2 full fat milk lattes every day, lots of cheese. Would sometimes buy gold top milk and enjoy a few glasses. And eggs as well. And lots of fish and seafood. I watched his documentary on hidden iodine and his viewpoint has definitely got me thinking. I also eat salt to taste (much more than most I would say). Though since read that UK salt is not iodised, so unlikely worrisome, though pink Himalayan salt I guess could be a different story. Definite useful prompt re iodine.

Likely to get my records from pregnancy to see levels, assuming tested, and likely to compare to now. I think the one thing we all know for sure is that no one has all the answers re hypothyroid, so I am always happy to keep an open mind. I guess this forum is not the place to ask for success stories as they’d have long gone!

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Yppah

Pink Himalayan salt also has very little iodine. Though tracking down the exact amount has proved difficult!

Iodine levels are rarely tested - except when expressly requested.

Yppah
Yppah in reply to helvella

.His other point was around supplements containing rogue iodine you don’t know about. With my many supplements, if that were the case, it could easily rack up. Though he did then suggest his multi...

greygoose
greygoose in reply to Yppah

We never recommend mults on here. There's always something, at least, wrong with them.

The bit re “recently diagnosed” is probably the key part I take from that.

Just because you're recently diagnosed, doesn't mean you recently became hypo. It can take such a long time to get a diagnosis, that I would hazard a guess that most people have been hypo for years before they actually get a diagnosis.

Besides, it's not something that happens suddenly. It takes quite a while with most people for the symptoms to drive you to consult a doctor, because as the thyroid fails, the adrenals take up the slack. Plus, with most symptoms, peope tend to put them down to aging, rather than anything actually being wrong. So, it's rather rare to catch it in the early stages, I think.

Yppah
Yppah in reply to greygoose

Thanks greygoose. I looked at his multivitamin and it had copper in there which I definitely wouldn’t take for a start. I would love there to be a good multivitamin or a few sensible combos, just to make my life easier!Defo going to think more re iodine and maybe even test, but don’t think I need his plan. I wonder how all vegans are not severely deficient, unless taking a vitamin. Definitely making me think about my son’s intake as he hates dairy and eggs.

Since teenage years I have easily put on weight just looking at a cake and so I suspect kicked off then. And likely management of weight issues and diets over the years have probably not done much to help me. Ah well, you live and learn!

Lovecake
Lovecake in reply to Yppah

Have a look on the Autoimmune Institute website. Helpful info. They seem to be aware of bad fillers. They have a multivitamin, but I don’t take it, you could look up what’s in it to see if it’s suitable.I agree with the others and prefer to take separate vitamins that I know I need.

I get their turmeric and also magnesium.

Yppah
Yppah in reply to Lovecake

Thanks, I will consider those when I next stock up for D+K2 and magnesium. Their multivitamin looks better than most to me as it doesn’t have iron or copper, but unfortunately has the full day’s iodine. Probably good for a vegan though.

Lovecake
Lovecake in reply to Yppah

They do listen to comments as not a big company. I was considering emailing and asking them to consider thyroid patients at some point.

Yppah
Yppah in reply to Lovecake

That’s a brilliant idea! I wonder if the people who run Thyroid UK would be interested in helping.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to helvella

It is pretty though 🌺

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Hidden

Agreed - and I've nothing against it. Except the hype.

Please would all who sell and promote salt give a full, clear and recent verified analysis?

Hidden
Hidden in reply to helvella

Agreed. When I had to have a low iodine diet before RAI, it was a nightmare sorting this out. Finally, Nuclear Medicine told me that only sea salt had iodine. That wasn’t a great deal of help though as the ingredients aren’t always specific.

Soon found out though that M&S always specify when sea salt is used.

I’m currently using a low dose electrolyte supplement which claims to be made from Utah seawater among other things. OH though this was ridiculous as “Utah is nowhere near the sea” 🙄. I had the last laugh though as it is from a salt water lake

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Hidden

I'll repeat, because I know I have said it before, the biggest surprise to me was glacé cherries!

The red food dye erythrosine contains high levels of bound iodine, although there is evidence that the bioavailability of this iodine is relatively low (Wenlock et al., 1982). Erythrosine provides another example of the variability in the advised content of a low-iodine diet between countries. In the US, erythrosine is known as F&DC Red No. 3 and is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use as a food coloring (US Food and Drug Administration, 1995). In contrast, in the UK, erythrosine is known as E127 and, under legislation implementing European Union law, it is limited to use in “cocktail cherries, candied cherries, bigarreaux cherries in syrup and cocktails” (Statutory Instrument, 1995). Even these types of ­cherries in the UK are often not colored with ­erythrosine. Alternative red food dyes are not high in iodine and ­blanket advice sometimes given to patients to avoid products colored pink or red is not necessary in countries such as the UK, in contrast to the US.

Erythrosine is also used to provide the red color in the coating of some tablets. This use continues in the UK as it is not covered by food legislation. Red-colored tablets can provide a source of iodine in the diet that is sometimes not considered.

sciencedirect.com/topics/bi...

Hidden
Hidden in reply to helvella

That is very surprising. I suppose that we’re ok using cochineal food dye - as long as we don’t mind eating bugs 😊

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Hidden

And the medicines which contain it are legion!

products.mhra.gov.uk/search...

Hidden
Hidden in reply to helvella

That’s staggering.

Iodine deficiency is said to contribute to ADHD (in fact the whole ASD spectrum). This may have been the rather muddled and contradictory reasoning for asserting that red sweeties and lollies should not be consumed by children.

Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women is another factor in these conditions.

Put all this together and the links and misdiagnoses between hypothyroidism and ASD become easy to understand.

sciencedirect.com/science/a...

Sharoosz
Sharoosz in reply to Hidden

That's probably why it's called "Salt Lake City"!

Thyb
Thyb in reply to helvella

THE MENTION OF IODINE ON HERE PROMPTED ME TO LOOK AT THE MILK I DRINK....OMG 'APPEARS' TO BE LOTS IN HERE helvella Yppah

Serendipitious
Serendipitious in reply to Thyb

However, this would be more of a concern if somebody drank gallons of milk and ate lots of cheese?

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Thyb

That appears to be pretty much the same as most UK milk. 31 micrograms per 100 mL.

And most don't consider there to be an issue with a total dietary iodine intake up to around the standard daily requirements. (Probably around 150 micrograms a day.) - Except when expressly on a low-iodine diet for medical reasons.

Yes - if you take 500 mL you will reach around 150 micrograms!

Thyb
Thyb in reply to helvella

Understand 'a bit'. I drink about 750-1000mls for Osteoporosis 🙂🤔. I'll cut down to 500mls

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Thyb

First rule - don't panic.

Remember that advice to be careful oftens appears when people are (or are considering) supplementing with a multivitamin which, on its own, might well contain 150 micrograms of iodine.

If you took someone who was actually getting 150 micrograms from diet, and they added such a multivitamin, they are suddenly doubling their intake.

You are probably stable on your current intake. Yes, maybe consider the issue. But don't jump without a period of calm thought. :-)

The worst thing you could do is make a sudden change then, down the line, end up with too little calcium and do an iodine test which shows you are actually low on that as well!

Yppah
Yppah in reply to Thyb

This suggests organic milk has less bda.uk.com/resourceDetail/p...

helvella
helvellaAdministrator in reply to Yppah

That certainly used to be the case - but I think various things were done (not sure what - maybe adding some form of iodine to their diet?) so it now has a similar amount of iodine to non-organic milk.

However, I think you would be well-advised to ask the actual dairy if you decided to try that route. The milk could vary in iodine content.

Yppah
Yppah in reply to Thyb

Definitely don’t want to panic you, but good to be aware I think. And all the very sensible stuff helvella says.

Is there a link or is it a book?

Yppah
Yppah in reply to Serendipitious

This is his “invisible iodine” documentary: invisibleiodine.com/movie-g... his “personalised thyroid plan”: personalizedthyroidplan.com...

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