interpreting Medichecks hormone test results - Thyroid UK

Thyroid UK
108,013 members125,276 posts

interpreting Medichecks hormone test results

Lambyla1
Lambyla1

Hi All wondering if anybody can shed some light on my medichecks hormone check I had done after yet another disappointing visit to endo I visited GP who told me that these results were normal and if anything the indicated that my pituitary is working really well!!!!

my pituitary scan (done without contrast) showed that I have an irregular shaped pituitary gland which may or may not be clinically significant whatever the hell that means and basically sod off! I have been diagnosed with mild secondary Hypo and have a multinodular thyroid with no sign of cancer. but based on the below results is that how any of you would interpret this... I would have thought that the results would have some significance - any input appreciated! FSH

3.85 IU/L reference range - 3.5 - 12.5

LH

20.1IU/L reference range - 2.4 - 12.6

OESTRADIOL

1,199 pmol/L reference range - 45.4 - 854

TESTOSTERONE

2.11nmol/L reference range 0.29 - 1.67

FREE ANDROGEN INDEX

2.11 reference range 0.2 - 7.1

PROLACTIN

1,198mU/L reference range 102 - 496 for reference I am 48 childless (had 5 miscarriages about 10 years ago) take 50mg Levo daily and do not take any other medication or supplements. I live in the channel Islands so trying to decide if I should find a pituitary specialist in UK or whether my GP is right and there is no significance to these results. He did mention they could possibly but unlikely be PCOS but I have no symptoms of this at all. thanks for reading

10 Replies
oldestnewest

Usually there are different ranges for sex hormones related to time of the month. I would say that your doctor hasn't got a clue and that high prolactin level needs looking at. High androgen can indicate PCOS (and you had fertility problems in the past), but I don't really know enough about it. High LH can mean you are in perimenopause, but doesn't fit with high oestradiol - that needs investigating too.

thank you x

Hi Lambyla, you have obviously had hormone problems for a long time. The nodules indicate your thyroid is struggling to produce more hormone and your dose of 50 mcgs. is hardly enough to keep your metabolism running. Sometimes it's a matter of not having enough iodine and using chlorine and fluoride forces it to use those instead. It is terrible you suffered those miscarriages when you might have done well with better treatment.

I often use Dr. John Bergman's Thyroid videos which explains what may go wrong.

Dr. David Clark has a series called "20 reasons for low thyroid" and talks about the various problems that occur including prolactin. STTM has information about lab tests, you may have to check for the European ranges. stopthethyroidmadness.com/o...

Lambyla1
Lambyla1
in reply to Heloise

Thanks Heloise, it is so difficult to decide whether to go for a second opinion as you are made to feel like a raging hypochondriac and I know that I don't suffer anywhere nearly as badly as some others do. I have just never really got to the root cause. I will take a read of the info you have provided x

Heloise
Heloise
in reply to Lambyla1

Oh Lamby, I'm in the U.S. and have the same problem. I couldn't even get an FT3 test the last time I went. I've been here at TUK responding to posts for six years and the best recommendation I can give is to find a functional doctor if possible. Even the internet doctors are more helpful and will Skype you. Conventional doctors seem to feel everything is "normal" but now that we can get our own tests and even hormone we have enough information to reach some conclusions on our own. These doctors are disgraceful and I assume to cover their own inadequacies.

Thyroid hormone is so essential to every cell of your body but the FT3 marker is more definitive than TSH once you have been diagnosed and treated.

Often you've had low thyroid for ten years before symptoms show up but there are triggers. If it's Hashimoto's, gluten is a huge issue. Your thyroid tissue actually resembles gluten proteins. Izabella Wentz is a big name in thyroid disease and attributes her condition to Epstein Barre. Gluten causes gut junctions to allow undigested proteins to leak which starts your immune reaction. the Thyroid is a soft target. I can't put all the information you need into a simple post but I urge you to look up David Clark's videos even though they are old I find then useful in describing the whole assortment of triggers for low thyroid. Also I've posted John Bergman's How to Heal Adrenals and Thyroid as he is brilliant and you will see why doctors are almost useless if not dangerous when it comes to hormone therapies.

You can do a lot to help yourself and I only wish you had come here much sooner. You are NOT a hypochondriac and your body has reacted normally to external forces.

Lambyla1
Lambyla1
in reply to Heloise

Thanks Heloise, I will take a look, it just gets better..today I went for an eye test (just to check there was no pressure on my optic nerve) only to be told my optic nerve was inflamed and I likely have Glaucoma so yet another hospital appointment. I believe there is a link between hypo and Glaucoma too. I have CT scan coming up for a swelling in my sphenoid sinus cavity, so just going to carry on gathering evidence for a second opion. thanks for your help x

Heloise
Heloise
in reply to Lambyla1

If you have inflammation anywhere, you will also have inflammation in your brain. My eye pressure has increased over the years and you are right, it is all related. It usually starts in the stomach and that is where gluten comes in. Actually I would be careful of all grains. Dr. Peter Osborne wrote a book called No Grain, No Pain and really advises to NOT eat grains. I think I agree.

I recommend Dr. Bergman's Thyroid/Adrenal videos but I think this one might also be a good one since hormones are so involved. If you like it, look up more of his videos on you tube. He's brilliant.

I am struck by how much overlap there is between hypothyroid symptoms and symptoms of "estrogen dominance." healthline.com/health/high-...

Lambyla1
Lambyla1
in reply to vocalEK

Thank you x

Heloise
Heloise
in reply to Lambyla1

Yes, estrogen can displace thyroid hormone. Dr. Clark explains in the short videos I mentioned. Videos #8 and #9 talk about antibodies related to thyroid.

You may also like...