Has anyone tried back cumin seed oil softgels f... - Thyroid UK

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Has anyone tried back cumin seed oil softgels for Thyroid/Hashi's?

Henson1980
Henson1980
10 Replies

Good Morning

I have just read the below article on how black cumin seed oil in the form of softgel capsules can help to improve Hashi's.

The article states that it's powerful anti-inflammatory agent and studies showed that:

1. LDL and triglycerides significantly reduced in the study group.

2. HDL levels increased in the study group.

3. The atherogenic index improved in the study group which is a marker of heart disease risk.

4. TSH and anti-TPO concentrations decreased.

5. T3 levels increased slightly

6. The weight and the BMI of those taking black cumin seed significantly reduced after 8 weeks compared to the placebo group which had no changes.

Link to article:

drhedberg.com/black-cumin-s...

So my question is, has anyone tried these capsules and had success? I have found these ones on amazon:

amazon.co.uk/Softgel-Capsul...

Many Thanks

Lauren Henson

10 Replies
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greygoose

Improve Hashi's in what way? That's very vague. And, the list of possible virtues of black seed oil have little to do with Hashi's…

1-3 These things being 'improved' will have no effect on Hashi's. Cholesterol and triglycerides are a total red herring. They don't cause heart attacks or strokes, they don't even cause any symptoms. Cholesterol will be high if T3 is low. Raise the T3 and the cholesterol levels will drop. And you won't feel a thing!

4. Another red herring. TPO and Tg antibodies are not the villains in the Hashi's story. They are not the disease, they are caused by the disease. They don't attack anything, and they don't destroy anything, they just clean up the blood after the attack. And, even if you were to somehow manage to get rid of every last one, you would still have Hashi's.

5. I think 'slightly' is the operative word, here. And I would ask: by how much? Given that, with Hashi's, levels will fluctuate, anyway, how do you know it was the black seed oil?

6. So what caused the weight-gain in the first place? If it was the hypothyroidism, which presumably is being treated, perhaps it was the treatment that caused the weight-loss, rather than the black seed oil. But, if it were the black seed oil, how come we don't know about it? With the hypos obsession with finding ways of losing weight, don't you think that we'd have discovered this, by now?

All that is not said to discourage you from trying black seed oil. I'm all for a bit of experimentation. I experiment with many things. I haven't, as yet done a sustained experiment with black seed oil, but have dabbled with the seeds in cooking. But, one thing I've learnt is that if it sounds too good to be true, it really isn't true. So, try the capsules, and let us know how you get on. But just don't expect too much. :)

Oh, and if you do a search on here, type black seed oil, or black cumin seed oil into the search box, you'll find many, many discussions on the same thing. x

1 like
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Henson1980

Thanks Greygoose. I will certainly give them a try, but will bear in mind your comments.

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greygoose

You're welcome. :)

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LynneG
LynneG
in reply to greygoose

Hi Greygoose, You seem v informed re antibodies and I would like to learn from you following your info. I had always been under the impression that the immune system created the Tg and TPO antibodies for one reason or another and that these antibodies attacked the thyroid tissue eventually destroying the gland if the antibodies were not reduced. This process is what is described in Gluten circles as it is known that thyroid tissue is remarkably similar in structure to gluten protein and an overwhelmed or confused immune system can mistake the tissue as marked for destruction. You are saying that this understanding is wrong and that the thyroid antibodies are created to mop up the damage that has happened to the thyroid and that the thyroid antibodies don't attack anything. So are we confused by the term, antibodies? As antibodies are usually understood to be made to attack and destroy. Is this another example of terms applied misleading us?

The report of the studyI have only just seen does state Statistically Significant results

thyroid.org/patient-thyroid...

Reply
greygoose
greygoose
in reply to LynneG

So are we confused by the term, antibodies? As antibodies are usually understood to be made to attack and destroy. Is this another example of terms applied misleading us?

No, I don't think you are confused. At least, no more than anyone else. But, there is a lot of confusion. There's one camp that says the Tg/TPO antibodies attack the thyroid, and another that says they don't. Antibodies don't just attack, but they do destroy. If you have a cold, your immune system will produce antibodies that go after the cold virus, surround it and take it away to be disposed of/destroyed. Antibodies are very specific. So, TPO antibodies are attracted by TPO, and Tg antibodies are attracted to Tg. Does this mean that they get into the thyroid to destroy the TPO and Tg within? I honestly don't know. However, when you consider that some people can have Hashi's without ever having raised levels of antibodies, but the thyroid is destroyed, anyway, it does make you wonder. I don't think we have any definitive conclusions.

This article says that TPO antibodies do attack the thyroid, but Tg antibodies don't. So, make of that what you will:

hashimotoshealing.com/under...

As for the article you link to, it's just as vague as the one in the original post. It says: may have beneficial effects on patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. That 'may' is very vague, and they don't really say in so many words what the real beneficial effects were. And, in an 8 week trial, I don't see how they can know anything for certain. As the French would say, I think they're taking their desires for the reality.

I still haven't tried it myself, although always intending to. So, many things to try - so many promises and so few results! And, given that my thyroid is now dead, I'm not sure I would find any benefits, anyway. Lowering cholesterol is of absolutely no benefit to me. Mines too low, anyway. And, I don't even believe that high cholesterol is a problem - I wish mine were a lot higher! Given that I already take 75 mcg T3, raising my FT3 is probably not necessary, and I don't even know if I have any inflammation. So, black cumin seed is not high on my list of priorities. But, I might get around to it one day. :)

Reply
LynneG
LynneG
in reply to greygoose

Wow, Thank you so much for the link. I think it is going to take me some time to absorb the info therein and the other links in the article. Fab tho to be able to have more info to try and understand :)

I fail to understand if you are prescribed thyroid hormone and the medical community know that you do not have a functioning thyroid why they are not testing your inflammation levels on an ongoing basis. I would ask for such testing CRP (C reactive protein) or if you can get it High Sensitive CRP (HS CRP) and then you can monitor how effective the proactive measures you are putting in place are.

Thanks again

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greygoose
greygoose
in reply to LynneG

The medical community has little understanding of, and even less interest in, thyroid problems. They just do not care. Their aim is not to make people better but to get them out of their surgery at any cost. They resent doing any sort of test related to thyroid conditions and do as little as possible. That may be difficult to understand at first, but you grow into it. They do not want to diagnose or treat hypos.

humanbean recently did a little experiment into the difference in testing CRP and HS CRP, and came to the conclusion, there was very little difference in the results, and it wasn't worth bothering with.

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BadHare

Rather than taking a pill, try adding some nigella seeds to your diet. You'll find them in your supermarket herb & spice section. They're tasty & nutritious, as are most of herbs & spices, & other food items that are grossly marked up to sell in pill form.

1 like
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Londinium

My suggestion is to keep Triglycerides towards the lower end of the lab ref. range, and HDL towards the upper end of the lab ref. range. If Triglycerides are at the upper end of the lab ref. range, try eliminating/reducing sugars, carbs, starches, grains...

My suggestion is to also avoid (when/if possible) the modern veg oils, such as sunflower oil, rapeseed oil, mazola, canola..).

2 likes
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LynneG

Hi Laura, You can buy pure Black Seed Oil in a 100ml bottle (no capsule ingredients) £4.95 from Grape Tree stores. Tastes v slightly peppery off the teasp or on salads.

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