Mild rant, may have gone in a circle: Called endo... - Thyroid UK

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Mild rant, may have gone in a circle

JennaShi
JennaShi

Called endo and she honored my request for an Ft3 test so I got it done yesterday and hope to get a better picture of t3 situation.

I havent recently seen the functional med doc and have stopped all supplements due to my stomach issues. I could see there was quite a difference, infact my b12 is still up in the 600s and I haven’t taken and b12 supplements in about a week. Not to mention I felt more energy. However the stomach problems need to be addressed and so once this is done we will decde what to do and move on.

Will be seeing the gastro doc soon to yet the results of upper gi as well as the endo. I recently got other tests done and have a couple questions. Previously about a year ago , I got an ANA test done and it came up negative. During that time I had already been diagnosed with hypothyroidism and even further back was diagnosed with Graves (before hypo) so I am curious if anyone has had a similar experience or if they know why this might have happened? I have heard they are not very sensitive. The results i got back yesterday were positive ANA speckled, the ratio was 1:80 range <1:40. So from reading up I am told the higher number you have the more antinuclear antibodies youhave, so my aren’t very much. These must bot he the same as TPO and TG I am assuming? TPO and TG attack thyroid tissue and the ANA attack nucleus. My other question is does anyone know whether by fixing you deficiences and eliminating food allergies that stimulate attack etc. heal the gut, Should call off the immune system correct? This is what I was thinking would happen when I started the protocol with the functional med doc. Would this still happen if you have fixed these things?

So I am curious that by stopping the protocol from my stomach issues and eating gluten (mild IGG allergy) again maybe once every two weeks or triggered an attack thus developing another disease? Or perhaps its been there the whole time and didnt know it? I feel like I’ve not come up with many answers from my choices. Thank you for reading my rant!

10 Replies
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An ANA test is not testing antibodies for a specific disease. It's to see if there's the possibility that you might have an autoimmune disease.

rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Pat...

JennaShi
JennaShi
in reply to greygoose

Thank you, I do realize this👍👌

greygoose
greygoose
in reply to JennaShi

These must bot he the same as TPO and TG I am assuming? TPO and TG attack thyroid tissue and the ANA attack nucleus.

Well, as you said the above, I assumed you didn't know that. ANA doesn't attack anything, it's just an indicator of autoimmunity. And, no, it's not the same as TPO and Tg antibodies. The test for those needs to be specific.

JennaShi
JennaShi
in reply to greygoose

You’re that would make sense with what I said. I was more thinking that I understood it was a non specific test, but wondering if hashimotos is considered under the umbrella of this test. Like for instance I have had high antibodies bodies bit the first ana test i took was negative🤔 so I wasnt sure if these would be considered since TPO and TG attack thyroid tissue. But ANA says the antibodies attack the nucleous in cells.. doesnt the tissue in thyroid have cells? Does that make more sense? I am sorry I was not clear. Its seems these things are being ised lightly so I dont bot totally understand.

greygoose
greygoose
in reply to JennaShi

"Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are a group of autoantibodies produced by a person's immune system when it fails to adequately distinguish between "self" and "nonself." The ANA test detects these autoantibodies in the blood.

ANA react with components of the body's own healthy cells and cause signs and symptoms such as tissue and organ inflammation, joint and muscle pain, and fatigue. ANA specifically target substances found in the nucleus of a cell, hence the name "antinuclear." They probably do not damage living cells because they cannot access their nuclei. However, ANA can cause damage to tissue by reacting with nuclear substances when they are released from injured or dying cells.

The ANA test is one of the primary tests for helping to diagnose a suspected autoimmune disorder or rule out other conditions with similar signs and symptoms. The ANA test may be positive with several autoimmune disorders. Patients with the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are almost always positive for ANA, but the percentage of patients with other autoimmune disorders who have positive ANA results varies. Also, a significant number of patients with a variety of other types of disorders (and even some heathy people) may be positive for ANA, especially at low levels."

labtestsonline.org/tests/an...

The above explains it better than I can. I have noticed that some people on here have negative ANA when we already know they have Hashi's, so it doesn't appear to be a reliable test for that.

JennaShi
JennaShi
in reply to greygoose

Thanks Greygoose 👍

greygoose
greygoose
in reply to JennaShi

You're welcome. :)

I would next test anti-TPO and TgAB separately to see if either is high positive.

JennaShi
JennaShi
in reply to cabro2

Thank you, I have, tpo is over 900 and tg is 1 👍

cabro2
cabro2
in reply to JennaShi

I hope you get help with anti-TPO that high, which indicates active thyroiditis.

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