Thyroid medication decreased after change of diet - Thyroid UK

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Thyroid medication decreased after change of diet

holme12
holme12

Hello I am a new member living in Spain. I have an underactive thyroid and been on eutyrox 100mcg for approx 15 years all blood test apart from cholestrol were great. approx 5 months ago I went gluten free to help with digestive problems which has helped enormously. After going Gluen free I reduced my eutyrox to 50mcg after speaking to a chemist because I had dizzy spells and palpatations. felt much better but blood results said differntly here are my results

COLESTEROL Espectrofotometría Ultravioleta-Visible RESULTADO......238mg/dL (<200)

Valoración: Nivel deseable: Inferior a 200 mg/dL Nivel límite superior: Entre 200 - 240 mg/dL Nivel alto: Superior a 240 mg/dL Amparado por la acreditación Enac.

LDL-COLESTEROL Calculado RESULTADO........161 mg/dL (<130)

Valoración: Nivel deseable: Inferior a 130 mg/dL Nivel límite superior: Entre 130 - 159 mg/dL Nivel alto: Entre 160 - 190 mg/dL Nivel muy alto: Superior a 190 mg/dL

T4 LIBRE ( TIROXINA LIBRE ) Quimioluminiscencia RESULTADO.... 0,91 ng/dL (0,70-1,48) Amparado por la acreditación Enac.

TIROGLOBULINA ANTICUERPOS Quimioluminiscencia RESULTADO....... 8,7 UI/mL (<4,0)

TPO ANTICUERPOS Quimioluminiscencia RESULTADO........................ 669,9 UI/mL (<6,0)

TSH ( HORMONA ESTIMULANTE DEL TIROIDES ) Quimioluminiscencia RESULTADO......37,27 µUI/mL (0,35-4,94)

I have in the past 2 weeks increased my dose to 75mcg hoping this will correct .

has anyone else had this experience?

17 Replies
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SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

It's difficult to decipher.

Is TSH 37.25?

If so, you did not need to reduce dose

As you have Hashimoto's (confirmed by high antibodies) vitamin levels are very often too low

You will need to test vitamin D, folate, B12 and ferritin along side Thyroid levels 6-8 weeks after dose increase to 75mcg

Dose needs increasing in 25mcg steps until tsh is around one and FT4 towards top of range and FT3 at least half way in range

All thyroid tests should ideally be done as early as possible in morning and fasting. When on Levothyroxine, take last dose 24 hours prior to test, and take next dose straight after test. This gives highest TSH, lowest FT4 and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, GP will be unaware)

holme12
holme12
in reply to SlowDragon

Thankyou for your reply, yes TSH was 37.27 this was the reading after being on 50mcg. I have increased my dose from 50mcg to 75mcg which is what I have been on now for a couple of weeks, I have taken on board your suggestions of blood tests vitamin D, folate, B12 and ferritin along side Thyroid levels 6-8 weeks after dose increase to 75mcg. You have been very helpfull.

holme12
holme12
in reply to SlowDragon

Is it a good idea to start taking the vitamin supplements before my next blood tests in 4/6 weeks? any recommendation is apprecaited many thanks

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to holme12

Really you should wait and test vitamin D, folate, B12 and ferritin first before starting any of these supplements

Selenium supplements can help improve conversion, so you could start that

Always only start one supplement at a time and wait at least 10-14 days to assess any noticeable benefit before even thinking about adding another

holme12
holme12
in reply to SlowDragon

Thankyou you reply is apprecaited

helvella
helvellaAdministrator

It is very important to realise that palpitations occur in both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism (and, of course, under-medication and over-medication).

There is such a strong meme that palpitations are a symptom of Graves/severe hyperthyroidism that any other part of the story gets drowned out and forgotten.

Going from 100 to 50 was very heavy-handed and I criticise any chemist who suggested or supported that approach. Small changes only - unless there is a very obvious and severe issue. For example, 25 micrograms or even 12.5 micrograms. (You could alternate doses 100 and 75, to achieve 87.5. I prefer to take the same dose every day but would do that to see how it goes.)

37.27 is a ludicrously high TSH for anyone being treated and on what is supposedly a stable dose.

holme12
holme12
in reply to helvella

Many thanks for your reply it looks like I was given some bad advice by the chemist recommending cutting the dosage by half. 37.27 TSH was the reading after being on 50mcg. I have increased my dose from 50mcg to 75mcg which is what I have been on now for a couple of weeks . I will go for more blood tests in the next few weeks as suggeted. Your information is helpful thankyou.

Ii

I have also, in desperation to find a solution, Tried a gluten free diet and am surprised at the results. It's only been 2 weeks and my bloating and weight have dropped also energy levels have increased hugely.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Flynzer

According to Izabella Wentz the Thyroid Pharmacist approx 5% with Hashimoto's are coeliac, but over 80% find gluten free diet helps, sometimes significantly. Either due to direct gluten intolerance (no test available) or due to leaky gut and gluten causing molecular mimicry (see Amy Myers link)

Changing to a strictly gluten free diet may help reduce symptoms, help gut heal and slowly lower TPO antibodies

amymyersmd.com/2017/02/3-im...

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

scdlifestyle.com/2014/08/th...

drknews.com/changing-your-d...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

But don't be surprised that GP or endo never mention gut, gluten or low vitamins. Hashimoto's is very poorly understood

Low vitamins are extremely common, especially if gluten intolerant

Flynzer
Flynzer
in reply to SlowDragon

Thank you so much for taking the time to reply and for the great links, all of which I've read. I feel that the door is open a crack and some hope there is a way forward for me. Doctors in the U.S. are obviously 'onto it' more than those in the U.K. So grateful to you.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Flynzer

Yes, they only test for coeliac here.

Most of us are gluten intolerant not coeliac. No easy test for that, you just have to try it

You don't need to be experiencing any gut symptoms to still benefit.

If gluten free diet helps then it's highly likely you also have low vitamin levels too. Vitamins need to be optimal, not just within range

Ask GP to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

Flynzer
Flynzer
in reply to SlowDragon

I must admit my GP prescribed Vitamin D but I feel nauseous after taking it which made me wonder if my system was trying to tell me 'no'.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Flynzer

How low was vitamin D?

How much are you currently prescribed, is it high loading dose, if so you were very deficient

Vitamin D does need to be optimal. Aiming to improve to around 100nmol. Vitamin D mouth spray by Better You is good as avoids poor gut function.

It's trial and error what dose each person needs. Once you Improve level, very likely you will need on going maintenance dose to keep it there.

Retesting twice yearly via vitamindtest.org.uk

Local CCG guidelines

clinox.info/clinical-suppor...

Government recommends everyone supplement October to April

gov.uk/government/news/phe-...

Also read up on importance of magnesium supplements when taking vitamin D

betterbones.com/bone-nutrit...

articles.mercola.com/sites/...

healthy-holistic-living.com...

articles.mercola.com/sites/...

Do NOT supplement any vitamin K if you take any blood thinning medication

drsinatra.com/vitamin-k2-su...

Flynzer
Flynzer
in reply to SlowDragon

Thanks again. I was prescribed Vitamin D after a mountain biking fall resulted in a broken leg. It was to help prevent osteoporosis. I should be taking 1 tablet of Adcal D3 lemon twice daily which contains:

1500mg calcium carbonate (equivalent to 600mg calcium) and 400 I.U. colecalciferol (equivalent to 10 micrograms of vitamin D3)

breakdown:

calcium carbonate (1500mg, equivalent to 600mg calcium) and vitamin D3 (400iu equivalent to 10ug colecalciferol)

xylitol (E967), modified maize starch, sodium saccharin (E954), magnesium stearate and lemon flavouring.

The vitamin D compound contains DlLa-tocopherol, edible fats (including soya oil), gelatin, sucrose and corn starch. Yuk.

I don't know what my levels were but will try to find out. Maybe it was just a precaution.

Will also find the mouth spray.

My GP is great but has said my symptoms are 'non-specific' and 'we don't know everything', which I completely understand.

It's such a relief to find somewhere that has the knowledge I need. It's not so lonely!

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Flynzer

So 800iu vitamin D daily, is very often not nearly enough

Essential to test twice yearly if supplementing vitamin D.

But if you have Hashimoto's, then many of us need around 2000iu just as ongoing maintenance dose and higher if trying to improve levels

If your vitamin D is low, often folate, B12 and ferritin are too

Low vitamin D affects gut biome and then low B vitamins - as explained here

drgominak.com/sleep/vitamin...

If on gluten free diet then low magnesium is common and linked to low vitamin D

theceliacmd.com/2013/05/mag...

glutenfreesociety.org/glute...

Flynzer
Flynzer
in reply to SlowDragon

Thanks

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