Thyroid UK
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Temperature and sweating

Hi, can anyone help. I regularly see an endo, the last visit last week.

The bloods all looked great apart from my calcium which is low.

I have no thyroid.

I swear a lot, after breakfast. Mid morning and evenings. I take 6.25mg if t3 3 times a day and take hrt too.

I was taking 25mg t3 once in the morning, but endo didn’t like the effect it might have on my heart. I wasn’t sweating so much then, although I was sweating occasionally.

Endo seems list with this. So embarrassing when sweating out and about.

Please help.

17 Replies
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I take 50mcg of T3 once daily. I don't think Endocrinologists understand T3 at all. They appear nervous about it I believe. Levothyroxine, T4 has to convert to T3 before we get any benefit at all.

How did it affect you heart? were you having severe palpitations?

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No I had no palpitations. They did a full scan of my heart and also wore a monitor for 24 hours. Nothing showed up on either. How much do you take?

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50mcg T3. When on levo I had constant palps and at times so severe I had to go by ambulance to the A&E. The cardiologist was puzzled and after a time was thinking of putting something in heart to monitor it but as soon as I stopped T4 so did palps.This link may be informative and it was by a doctor who was also an Adviser to Thyroiduk.org.uk and he also ran the Fibromyalgia Research Foundation before his death. He would never prescribe levo but NDT or T3 for thyroid hormone resistant patients.

web.archive.org/web/2010103...

He himself took 150mcg of T3 in the middle of the night.

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Hi. I thought that the high temperatures and sweating of head and face were side effects of chemically induce menopause 20 years ago. Was offered no help anywhere over this period and was expected to just get on with it . Only when going onto T3 did things improve and now going gluten free has almost eliminated flushing in the day and minimally during the night.

Hope this helps and that you find a solution to hellish and embarrassing symptoms soon.

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Thank you muriel1234 for replying. Yes they do seem menopausal, have had them for a few years now. When on T3 they have improved. Was taking 25mg in the morning and was feeling loads better apart from a sleep in the afternoon. Not so many sweating moments. Now my Endo has changed my t3 to 6.25mg3 times a day and I could not stops sweating this morning.

Does gluten free really work? I didn't find it helped me before.

How long have you been doing this?

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I was quite sceptical about going gluten free. I really thought you were allergic or you weren’t. But, I have found differences and improvements. I used to have multiple hot flushes a day. I am amazed to say this has improved dramatically. .today I have not had any. I am happy about this but sad that no gp ever suggested allergies could be a cause... I have only been gluten free for three months, I will do further bloods in two or three months and see if antibodies have come down. I am hoping for further improvement of other symptoms

Let me know how you get on if you decide to retry. I found it quite easy once I had made my mind up

Hope you get sorted soon x

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Thank you, will let you know. X

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Dr Lowe advised one daily dose of whatever he prescribed and especially for T3 he stated that the dose of T3 had to saturate our T3 receptor cells and thereafter it sent out 'waves' which effect lasted between one to three days.

We are all different and some do perfectly well on levo but others cannot so we should be offered alternatives which they've now prevented from being prescribed on the NHS.

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Hello, thanks for your reply.

I did feel better when the tablet of t3 was taken n the morning.

Do you have your heart monitored? My endo does seem a little obsessed with it.

Dr Lowe, is he your gp or a well known endo?

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Dr Lowe was a scientists/researcher and was an Adviser to Thyroiduk.org.uk and he lived in Florida, USA. He had an accident which caused his death. He would never prescribe levothyroxine as he said it was through payments that levo became the No.1 thyroid hormone replacement instead of NDT as that was the only replacement since 1892 up until when the blood tests and levo slowly became to replace NDT but many people couldn't get well and sourced their own NDT. I have a monitor which I can use but haven't for months for pulse/blood pressure. I feel well.

Dr Lowe was greatly missed for his sensible and humane way of diagnosing/treating patients. He only used a blood test intially for diagnosing and afterwards it was always about how a patient felt on a particular dose.

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Thank you for your reply. I am going to look up this Dr Lowe.

I have heard that NDT is like a miracle for some users. It is expensive to source when you have to use it for rest of your life.

I thought having the T3 would make all the difference, it has somewhat but the sweats do get me down.

Thank you you again for your reply.

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His sites are archived since his death and difficult to search for. I will give you some that I have: Quite a few topics on this link:

web.archive.org/web/2010103...

web.archive.org/web/2010103...

Chapter 2

tinyurl.com/ya5blrr2

Chapter 3

tinyurl.com/y7ejh9sh

Chapter 7

tinyurl.com/ycxpz565

You will have to copy/paste tinyurls

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Prudent to check Vitamin D3 levels. My head sweats when sleeping when it is sub optimal. If you’re supplementing D3 don’t forget to take calcium and vitamin K2 as well.

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My vitD is ok. I take adcal tablets twice a day with food. The endo is not worried about vitD only calcium.

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Vitamin K2 keeps the calcium in the bones. Could the sweating be related to SIBO or SIMO as it occurs after food?

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Thank you for replying, will take an extra supplement of K2.

Can I ask what SIBO or SIMO is. Is it related to diabetes. I am pre diabetic, sometimes they say I am and then other times say I am not. Might be the T4 and T3 making it fluctuate.

Thank you for taking the time to reply.

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SIBO small Intestine bacterial overload and SIMO small intestine mould overload. If you are prediabetic then you could have insulin resistance. Google SIBO and you’ll find a wealth of information. The excess sugars feed the micro organisms in the wrong place . Stomach HCL and digestive enzymes keep these rogue micro organisms in check. The exotoxins given off by them contribute to inflammation and stress our hypothyroid systems even more.

Best Wishes

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