Thyroid UK
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Advice Please: Organic Beef Bone Broth? 72 Hours cooking time?

Hello Everybody,

As I pursue my endeavours to improve my gut biome, having made a good start on the Kefir, I am now looking to try and make this legendary Bone Broth.

I have a few questions for those that are well practiced in this mystical art!

I leave the lid partially on my huge cooking pot, if not the contents boils away completely in a short time. I presume this is the thing to do?

Secondly I find I have to keep adding water otherwise it would boil away completely.

Thirdly, it has taken me three days to reach 24hrs of 'simmering'. I have read that some websites say 48hrs, others say 72hrs of cooking time?

Can anybody confirm that the minimum required cooking time and surely I need to keep adding water to be able to cook as long as minimum of 48 or possibly 72? People warn about making it too watery, but how else can you simmer for so long and not boil a hole in the cooking pot?!!!

Any advice most welcome.

Poppy the 🐈

24 Replies
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Poppy_the_cat,

I am not replying from my experience of making bone broth - I don't have any. But I suspect you are setting the burner too high. I don't think a huge panful should boil away in "a short time".

Well aware that with some hobs it is very difficult to find a setting that is just right.

If it is impossible with your hob, you could consider a thermostatically controlled induction burner. No - I also don't have one - but I believe some are (relatively) inexpensive. Check thoroughly before comitting - some might be very much better or worse than others. And you need a pan that is induction compatible.

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Thanks for your reply,😃.

Well, I have it at the very lowest simmer...and it is just put- putting away very slowly...

🤔

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Poppy - I cook mine in my slow cooker for 48 hours and don't have to worry about it boiling away. I understand 48 hours is OK for beef broth and 24 hours for chicken broth.

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Ok, that sounds good. Sp in the slow cooker it does not boil away?

Our slow cooker is not as big as the big Paderno pot that we have, that was why I opted for the pot. I guess you just leave the slow cooker on overnight? I am not sure how expensive that will be on the electricity bill I guess??

How often do you make it?

Thanks for the advice

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Yes I leave the slow cooker on overnight. I don't think it's too expensive, but I've never worked out the cost!

I don't make it regularly, just when I can get the organic bones. I freeze some and thaw it when needed.

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Brilliant. I shall transfer my 'druidic ossuary' to the slow cooker! Many thanks for the advice.

Poppy 😄

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Hi Trixie. I'm looking for a good source of reasonably priced organic bones in the US. I rarely see them in the various stores I shop in and often not at all. I am about to order some pre-made bone broth from a(recommended) company called 'Kettle and Fire' as a last resort. But they are expensive and I prefer to make my own 'anything'. I've tried Whole Foods/Sprouts/ as well as the garden variety grocers (Publix/ Krogers; no bones. Any suggestions? If I have to order online I'd rather order the bones and make my own broth rather than ready made. And I prefer to find them locally so I can see what I'm buying. Also what kind of kefir is best for G.I. problems? I have made bone broth before and, for me, the only way to go is my 5 qt. slow cooker. Also, idoes anyone who is basically dairy-free still drink kefir. I try to be dairy-freebut I believe kefir is a good product for G.I. health. Thanks. irina1975

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irina1975 - I'm in the UK so don't know about sourcing organic bones in the US. Sorry. Trixie

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Only the cost of a light bulb for slow cooker cooking, very economical.

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How to -

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Two hours in a pressure cooker! I use an electric one - much easier.

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Hillwoman,

I am not familiar with using electric pressure cookers (though I have read about them), but I suspect that using any form of pressure cooker would have the following advantages - in addition to being much, much faster:

Less steam in the kitchen;

No need to leave it on overnight or otherwise unattended;

Less smell of cooking around the house;

Lower energy usage.

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Correct on every point. :-) In fact, if I hadn't had the pressure cooker, I would never have attempted making bone broth the traditional way. Our kitchen extractor fan isn't very good, and the weather is frequently too wild in these parts to leave the window open (not an option overnight in any case.)

I use a model which can also be used as a slow cooker, which saves on valuable counter space. It's the Instant Pot brand - 6L size - but other brands are available. :-)

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Could I ask exactly what brand of pressure cooker it is please?

Thanks

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It's an Instant Pot, "6-in-1 Lux" model, which I bought on Amazon in 2016. It can also be used as a slow cooker. I've just discovered they don't seem to be available in the UK now, so have hurriedly purchased some accessories I needed. There are several other brands of electric PC available though.

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Hillwoman,

In no way meant other than to illustrate the product:

ebay.co.uk/i/142650672603

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That's the one, but it's very expensive - I paid around £80.

I've just emailed the UK office of the manufacturer to register my concern about future availability of parts and accessories, since this model seems no longer to be available here.

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And The Guardian has an article today on that very product!

theguardian.com/lifeandstyl...

Poppy_the_cat

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I saw the article this morning and skimmed through. I didn't realise I was a 'pothead'...Finally, after all these years! ;-)

I've used the pressure cooking function for bone broth of course, but less often for meals, though I've been trying to make more frequent use of this method. There is, allegedly, some advantage to pressure cooking if one suspects a sensitivity to histamine.

I've been using some AIP recipes of US origin, and I've found that the cheaper cuts of organic meat I prefer to buy are not always cooked with the degree of flavour and tenderness I can get from using the IP as a slow cooker (with the glass lid). I'm having to make large adjustments to liquid quantities and cooking times. I'm still learning to get the best out of this equipment.

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Only two hours? All the advice is 48 and some 72! I can just about cope with 48...but 2 seems very little?

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It's because it's pressure cooked - a different kettle of bones altogether.

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I leave the lid partially on my huge cooking pot

Why not leave the lid completely on? The problem with boiling away will be much less if you leave the lid completely on all the time.

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Thank you

😄

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That’s what I do. If you can’t I suspect the simmer is too high and it would be best to find another method.

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