Thyroid UK

T3

Hi could someone please let me know where I can get T3 from please thanks

34 Replies
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Welcome to the forum, Lauren15.

Members are more inclined to share sources with new members who include some background about their illness such as how long they’ve been diagnosed, recent thyroid results and ranges, and current thyroid medication.

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TSH 0.02 (0.2 - 4.2)

Free T4 19.4 (12 - 22)

Free T3 3.4 (3.1 - 6.8)

Diagnosed 2011, taking 175mcg levo. Was previously on T3 before

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Lauren15,

Why was T3 prescription stopped?

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Current endo thinks I don't need it but previous endo recognised I had a clinical need for it.

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Lauren15,

Some of these endos are so fascist about T3. Your FT3 is low so it looks like you do need it.

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Yes I am not keen on my endo. I left a message with his secretary saying I was unhappy with having T3 withdrawn despite having a clinical need for it. It's keeping me in work and I wish he could see that. But he took me straight off it.

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Lauren15,

Read the FAQS to patients in the statement the BTA issued about withdrawing T3. In it they clearly tell patients who find benefit from taking T3 that they should be able to continue on it. british-thyroid-association...

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Thanks I downloaded these some time ago and copied the information into a letter but no idea who to send it to. The endo I see probably won't put me back on it but I can't medicate myself without guidance from a specialist. I'm likely to get it wrong.

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Lauren15,

No big deal if you get it wrong. Doctors get doses wrong all the time. Look at yours - he's withdrawn it altogether. How much were you prescribed?

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10mcg T3

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Lauren15,

Okay, start with 6.25mcg and if that's not enough take 2 x 6.25mcg doses 1 in the morning with Levothyoxine and the second at bedtime. Hold 6-8 weeks at 12.5mcg and have a thyroid test including FT3 if you want to increase T3 dose further. As long as FT3 remains within range you'll be fine.

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Thanks :)

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Lauren15

Can you give us some background information please, members are more likely to share their source of supply when new members tell us about their thyroid journey.

Can you please post your latest thyroid results, with reference ranges, say what dose of thyroid meds you are on, have you had dose changes and why. We can help with how to add T3 and advise whether Levo needs reducing.

Have you had thyroid antibodies tested and were they raised - do you have Hashimoto's?

Have you had vitamins and minerals tested, are they at optimal levels to enable thyroid hormone to work?

We find that virtually every new member who asks for T3 suppliers has been undermedicated and generally has Hashi's and dire nutrients, and all that needs sorting before adding T3.

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TSH 0.02 (0.2 - 4.2)

Free T4 19.4 (12 - 22)

Free T3 3.4 (3.1 - 6.8)

Diagnosed 2011, taking 175mcg levo. Was previously on T3 before

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What about antibodies and vitamins and minerals?

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Thyroid peroxidase antibody 98.5 (<34)

Thyroglobulin antibody 266.3 (<115)

I would continue supplementing if I wasn't being told different things by haematologists and nutritionists. I only have results taken 6 months ago.

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Lauren15

Your thyroid story is unfolding as I expected, exactly the same as other new members asking for T3 suppliers, who have all had raised antibodies and poor nutrient levels and doctors who haven't a clue.

Thyroid peroxidase antibody 98.5 (<34)

Thyroglobulin antibody 266.3 (<115)

Your high antibodies mean that you are positive for autoimmune thyroid disease aka Hashimoto's which is where antibodies attack the thyroid and gradually destroy it. The antibody attacks cause fluctuations in symptoms and test results.

Most doctors dismiss antibodies as being of no importance and know little or nothing about Hashi's and how it affects the patient, test results and symptoms and as such they don't know how to treat properly. You need to read, learn, understand and help yourself where Hashi's is concerned.

You can help reduce the antibodies by adopting a strict gluten free diet which has helped many members here. Gluten contains gliadin (a protein) which is thought to trigger autoimmune attacks so eliminating gluten can help reduce these attacks. You don't need to be gluten sensitive or have Coeliac disease for a gluten free diet to help.

Supplementing with selenium l-selenomethionine 200mcg daily can also help reduce the antibodies, as can keeping TSH suppressed.

Gluten/thyroid connection: chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

hypothyroidmom.com/hashimot...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

Hashi's and gut absorption problems tend to go hand in hand and can very often result in low nutrient levels or deficiencies. As you say you have been supplementing then I expect your levels are poor. Please post your latest results, say if you are supplementing now and with what, or what you were supplementing before.

No thyroid hormone can work unless nutrient levels are optimal. Malabsorption needs to be addressed so that nutrients can be absorbed and then your thyroid hormone can work. Adding T3 before addressing the other problems will be of no help. To address the absorption problem, see SlowDragon's reply to this post which has useful information and links to help healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

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No idea what to do about my vitamin and mineral levels, started and stopped and restarted supplements thinking they will help and a week in no improvement. Thanks

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Lauren

As I said in my post above

Please post your latest results, say if you are supplementing now and with what, or what you were supplementing before.

**

"started and stopped and restarted supplements thinking they will help and a week in no improvement."

Are you really expecting an improvement in a week? It takes a lot longer than that, if you post your results we can see what state your nutrients are in and make suggestions, but as said previously, nutrients can't be absorbed until the gut/absorption problems caused by Hashi's are addressed.

We have to look at the bigger picture here and fit all the pieces of the jigsaw together.

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Ferritin 61.1 (30 - 400) I am iron deficient and ferritin the time before this result was 101.3 (30 - 400) back in January 2017

Folate 2.3 (2.5 - 19.5) taking 5mg folic acid

Vitamin B12 336 (190 - 900) taking B12 injections and result before this one was 538.5 (190 - 900) in January 2017

Vitamin D total 71 (50 - 75) taking 6000iu D3 since March 2015. Was prescribed vitamin D3 800iu back in November 2013 for vit D 30.7 (25 - 50 deficient)

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Lauren

Ferritin 61.1 (30 - 400) I am iron deficient and ferritin the time before this result was 101.3 (30 - 400) back in January 2017

Are you taking anything for the iron deficiency? For confirmed iron deficiency the correct treatment is, according to NICE Clinical Knowledge Summary for iron deficiency anaemia treatment (which will be very similar to your local area guidelines):

cks.nice.org.uk/anaemia-iro...

How should I treat iron deficiency anaemia?

•Address underlying causes as necessary (for example treat menorrhagia or stop nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, if possible).

•Treat with oral ferrous sulphate 200 mg tablets two or three times a day.

◦If ferrous sulphate is not tolerated, consider oral ferrous fumarate tablets or ferrous gluconate tablets.

◦Do not wait for investigations to be carried out before prescribing iron supplements.

•If dietary deficiency of iron is thought to be a contributory cause of iron deficiency anaemia, advise the person to maintain an adequate balanced intake of iron-rich foods (for example dark green vegetables, iron-fortified bread, meat, apricots, prunes, and raisins) and consider referral to a dietitian.

• Monitor the person to ensure that there is an adequate response to iron treatment.

So you should be taking 2 or 3 x ferrous fumarate and you should be monitored.

Take each iron tablet with 1000mg Vitamin C to aid absorption and help prevent constipaton. Always take iron 4 hours away from thyroid meds and two hours away from other medication and supplements as it will affect absorption.

For your ferritin level, this has obviously decreased a lot since January. Were you taking iron tablets then? For thyroid hormone to work (that's our own as well as replacement hormone) ferritin needs to be at least 70, preferably half way through range.

You can help raise your level by eating liver regularly, maximum 200g per week due to it's high Vit A content, and including lots of iron rich foods in your diet apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/in...

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Folate 2.3 (2.5 - 19.5) taking 5mg folic acid

Vitamin B12 336 (190 - 900) taking B12 injections and result before this one was 538.5 (190 - 900) in January 2017

Is your folic acid daily?

How often are your B12 injections?

You can ask on the Pernicious Anaemia Society forum for further advice healthunlocked.com/pasoc

If you are between injections at the moment that could account for your level being lower, but you can, of course, top up between injections and the PA forum members can advise on that.

**

Vitamin D total 71 (50 - 75) taking 6000iu D3 since March 2015. Was prescribed vitamin D3 800iu back in November 2013 for vit D 30.7 (25 - 50 deficient)

6000iu daily is a decent amount to take for a level of 71.

The level recommended by the Vit D Council is 100-150nmol/L.

What D3 supplement are you taking? For Hashi's patients an oral spray is recommended for best absorption, eg BetterYou.

Are you taking D3's important cofactors vitamindcouncil.org/about-v...

D3 aids absorption of calcium from food and K2-MK7 directs the calcium to bones and teeth where it is needed and away from arteries and soft tissues where it can be deposited and cause problems.

D3 and K2 are fat soluble so should be taken with the fattiest meal of the day, D3 four hours away from thyroid meds.

Magnesium helps D3 to work and comes in different forms, check to see which would suit you best and as it's calming it's best taken in the evening, four hours away from thyroid meds

naturalnews.com/046401_magn...

Check out the other cofactors too.

**

Has your GP checked you for malabsorption? Coeliac disease? Investigations should be done.

Are you taking a probiotic to build up good bacteria.

Do you have low stomach acid scdlifestyle.com/2012/03/3-... Very easy to do a home baking soda test.

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Have not been on any iron tablets since infusion in May 2016 despite confirmed iron deficiency. Folic acid every day. B12 injections every 3 months, last one January 2017. I take oral D3 spray by Better You and double it to 6000iu from 3000iu. GP has not checked for malabsorption or coeliac disease. I do not take probiotic and I have low stomach acid

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Lauren

B12 injections every 3 months, last one January 2017

So that's not exactly every 3 months then is it. Have you chased it up? Make an appointment and get this sorted. Was Pernicious Anaemia diagnosed? As mentioned, you can get advice from the PA forum here on Health Unlocked, just go to their page, click FOLLOW so that you can post.

Have not been on any iron tablets since infusion in May 2016 despite confirmed iron deficiency.

I have given you the NICE CKS summary above. Go to the link and print it, take it to your GP and say that as you have confirmed iron deficiency you want the appropriate treatment.

GP has not checked for malabsorption or coeliac disease.

As for investigations, and to help yourself check out the links in the post by SlowDragon that I linked to.

I do not take probiotic

It would be worth starting supplementing to build up good gut bacteria.

I have low stomach acid

You can supplement with Betaine HCL with Pepsin, making sure that you only take the capsules during a meal, or you can use Organic Apple Cider Vinegar with Mother - add to either honey sweetened water or orange juice, start with 1 teaspoonful of ACV and gradually build up over time to 1 tablespoon, take just before a meal.

And remember, even if you do add T3 to your Levo, no thyroid hormone can work properly until your nutrient levels are optimal and your absorption problem sorted, and you need to address the Hashi's too.

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Lots of good advice there SeasideSusie, as ever. Well done you for finding the time. I hope it's appreciated.

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Thanks I have chased it up but GP surgery have told me to wait another month for an available slot, intrinsic factor antibodies negative

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Periods reduce my ferritin by 20 points per cycle. Surely my GP needs to do something?

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How do you know? Do you have ferritin tested after every period? Have you discussed it with your GP?

One of our other members knows more about ferritin/iron and periods than me, humanbean is it you or is it SlowDragon

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I get ferritin tested every period. I haven't discussed it with GP

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I haven't discussed it with GP

I think it's about time you did then, and I'm not sure how you can say "Surely my GP needs to do something?" if you've not discussed it with him.

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I discussed it once and he refused to help me

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Then I think it's time you looked for another doctor, or you could actually make a complaint against this one.

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Its humanbean

Sorry I don't know much about iron

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Thanks SD, I should have known that as I remember saving a really good post by HB the other day, unfortunately it didn't mention periods!

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I would make an urgent appointment with any GP at the practice

Ask for immediate B12 injection, ferritin investigation, likely to need iron infusion and testing for coeliac disease

If you get nowhere on firm date for B12 then take this up with practice manager

Hashimoto's affects the gut and leads to low stomach acid as you have realised and then low vitamin levels

Low vitamin levels stop Thyroid hormone working

Poor gut function can lead leaky gut (literally holes in gut wall) this can cause food intolerances. Most common by far is gluten

According to Izabella Wentz the Thyroid Pharmacist approx 5% with Hashimoto's are coeliac, but over 80% find gluten free diet helps significantly. Either due to direct gluten intolerance (no test available) or due to leaky gut and gluten causing molecular mimicry (see Amy Myers link)

But don't be surprised that GP or endo never mention gut, gluten or low vitamins. Hashimoto's is very poorly understood

Changing to a strictly gluten free diet may help reduce symptoms, help gut heal and slowly lower TPO antibodies

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

amymyersmd.com/2017/02/3-im...

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

scdlifestyle.com/2014/08/th...

drknews.com/changing-your-d...

Low stomach acid can be an issue

Lots of posts on here about how to improve with Apple cider vinegar or Betaine HCL

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/hypochl...

scdlifestyle.com/2012/03/3-...

healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

Other things to help heal gut lining

Bone broth

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

Probiotics

carolinasthyroidinstitute.c...

Importance of magnesium

hypothyroidmom.com/two-vita...

Improving vitamins to high levels is essential. Strictly gluten free diet likely necessary

Getting Levo dose stable and TSH low and FT4 towards top of range and FT3 at least half way in range

If FT3 remains low ......then we can look at adding T3

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