Acupressure and Acupuncture - concentrating on the thyroid points?

The other day when the Endo checked my neck/thyroid he pressed into my shoulders and I squealed in pain. He said these were 'thyroid acupressure points' and that once we have the thyroid until control that could be dealt with by acupressure/acupuncture?

Has anyone tried either of these for the thyroid?

What exactly should I be hoping to achieve from having this? Less symptoms, less attacks?

39 Replies

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  • I don't know but that is v interesting. I know I have those painful pressure points too.

  • I have terrible issues with my neck and shoulder blades and recently had a frozen shoulder for the best part of 6 weeks. It loosens up after a while but I know it will come back at some point. My GP gave me acupuncture and I did find it helped the only thing was that after about 4 days my neck went in to complete spasm and I cried with the pain. I took painkillers and diazepam to loosen the muscles and within a few days it was completely gone. For how long is anyone's guess.

  • Hiya i am seeing the same specialist ( I think)and on the course no 11 of acupuncture and acupressure massage and feeling much better .

    I used to have a random painful shoulder freeze for 2 sec for the past and it's gone . i also have series of food intolerances which are being treated by acupuncture on the Chinese gall blader meridian.

    Good luck

  • Hi, this sounds very interesting. Can you say who you are seeing please and what is 'course no 11'? Thanks.

  • Hiya, my specilist is Dr B at Elland Spire hospital. I go to alternative clinic in Sowerby Bridge for acupuncture and acupressure by Dr W. you can book a block of 6 or 10 acupuncture sessions and yesterday I had my 11th. session. hope this helps

  • Luv luv luv acupuncture. Releases blocks that you may not even know about or realize because with any chronic diagnosis, it weighs on you conciously or unconciously. Acupuncture opens thins up so the thought andf subliminal messages just flow throush. at least that's my experience

  • Helena,

    I have had acupuncture sessions many times in the past as like to follow a holistic approach alongside the unfortunate need for some conventional meds.

    I believe that acupressure points enable healing energy to unblock channels so promoting well being and balance, that can only encourage our bodies to maintain equilibrium. I also practice daily yoga and mediation.

    If your hypothyroidism is caused by an imbalance in your bodies homeostatic (balancing) mechanisms (ie poor diet and life style, etc) perhaps a re evaluation and acupuncture could help to restore better thyroid function, alongside Chinese herbs, which I read can have very positive effects on some thyroid issues.

    However, if your hypothyroidism is caused by Hashimotos or some issue with the pituitary gland, then no amount of acupuncture will replace those missing hormones or fully heal the condition.

    I am a strong believer that taking a positive approach actually heals us to an extent, so would say go for it if it makes you feel better.

  • well he is tuned in isint he, and not shut off from unconventional, he may well help there as the body has meridians connected to every organ etc, where energy flows thru and this acupressure and acupuncture would very maybe help, give it a go. I ama great

    believer in Chinese medicine provided you get a qualified practitioner-- Chinese herbs a while ago cured a little boy of dreadful excema all over his face in continual pain, iposted it here.. they are very knowledgeable the Chinese.. go for it girl and let us know.. I would have it but unable to afford it , it has done wonders for a lot of people.

    hashimotos tho is another story as it is autoimmune, having said that who knows because once the unblocked energy flows it could actually improve the whole body cells, etc, welfare and it could all turn around.. nothing is impossible.. I like to think..

  • Hi Helena & fday,

    I'd love to know which acupuncture & acupressure points he's using for your thyroid. Would you please ask?

    Thanks,

    Mel

  • Chienese gallbladder meridian

  • Thanks, but I doubt he did all 44 Gallbladder TCM points!

  • 17 points with electro acupuncture and acupressure massage on all the gallblader pressure points. Each session lasts 1 hr.

  • He did electro acupuncture on 34 needles at once, & massaged the length of the GB channel from your feet to your face?

  • Acupuncture on 17 points with electro pulse on two points , usually around the ankles for 30mins.

    acupressure massage from toes to the head for 30mins.

    Thanks

  • I use acupressure to relieve some symptoms like should pain and bad headaches when the balance is gone. But when I'm fine I don't need to do acupressure at all. So it helps but can't deal with the root problem as I don't have the thyroid gland any more.

  • I wonder if these painful points he's talking about are the same as the fibromyalgia painful points?? Seems they are often too quick to diagnose fibro when in some cases it's poorly treated hypothyroidism.

  • That's a very interesting thought, mrsm49. I was diagnosed with fibro around 10 years ago after having that "pressure point" test (and not many other tests - I've been hassling the docs for more tests ever since). I now wonder if I really have fibro at all as other unexplained (by my doc) symptoms appeared (eg. hair loss) and I eventually self-diagnosed as hypo (which I'm now self-treating).

  • Me, too. I know I'm undermedicated when I feel my "FM" symptoms are creeping back. The Barnes basal body temperature test was more accurate for me.

    Mel

  • Endo tried to diagnose me with ME/CFS as I was still suffering symptoms despite low tsh and high t4. This was before doing any other tests! I did some research and ME (& fibro) are what is called a "diagnosis of exclusion" meaning all avenues of testing must be exhausted first. In my experience this rarely happens sadly. For me a lot of my symptoms went away with high dose b12 and changing my diet to include high selenium and magnesium foods. Their response was disbelief although they agreed I had improved. It's a sad state of affairs when consultants are stuck in outdated tramlines and no longer seem to think independently anymore and we have to suffer for it

  • That's really interesting is the B12 a natural or synthetic tablets or injected?? I've been treated for hypothyroidism for 5years and now diagnosed by Dr for cfs/me symptoms .Frustrated by the lack of treatment my husband researched the work of dr myhill who recommends injected B12.

  • I take solgar sublingual methylcobalamin 5000mcg from Amazon. Works for me thank goodness. Still got hypo problems but least numb hands & most of brain fog has gone :-)

  • A lot of FM test points are the same, or close to an acupuncture point.

  • Right on target. The relationship between hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia has been known for quite some time. The thyroid is responsible for a myriad of conditions. When we understand how it works and what happens when it's not in an optimal state, it's easy to follow the dots.

    I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in 1988. I've had it ever since I can remember. The outside of the hips also are pressure points that can really flare up when hypothryoidism is not in check. Sometimes the shoulders feel as if a Mac truck sits on them. Even the collarbone can radiate pain. There is not a doubt in my mind that fibromyalgia is a result of hypothyroidism.

    When I became hyperthyroid with Grave's Disease (the result of four decades without treatment for hypothyroidism), all fibromyalgia symptoms ceased. Gone.

    As hypothyroidism set in again after treatment for Grave's... fibromyalgia came back with a vengeance!

    Bloating and gut issues, immense fluid retention, headaches, brain fog, confusion, even clinical psychosis can happen to a person with elevated TSH levels. All sorts of problems surface when hypothyroidism is not properly treated. The good thing is that with proper treatment, all those things go away.

    There are a myriad of reasons why proper treatment for an individual is so elusive: many things can get in the way of vitamin, mineral, and replacement hormones being absorbed by the body. It's a moving target for so many of us. Doctors don't have the time to help us tweak our medications; and, unfortunately, they don't want to put the medications in our hands to do the job ourselves. If we are not allowed to tweak our doses as needed, we will forever be dependent on physicians who simply don't get it and don't care.

    And for those who have absorption and T4 conversion issues, T3 is the way to keep the thyroid hormones up so that a person can function wonderfully while completing the quest of getting their absorption and/or conversion issues under control.

    Not all who have hypothyroidism are overly complex cases, but any case can be somewhat complex seemingly overnight. Because our bodies change daily. We are not completely the same person we were yesterday. Thyroid hormone resistance can mean we keep asking for our doses to be increased while all tests say otherwise. It's not about the tests. It's about how we feel.

    Even without thyroid hormone resistance, after some time, most need to make some adjustments in dosage. This is something we have to pay close attention to and prove we know what is best for our bodies. This is why so many people are suffering while doctors continue to preach Big Pharma's mantra: that levothyroxine easily replaces thyroid hormones; all the while telling the patient to continue on the same dose for ridiculous amounts of time while the patient is ready to tear out what little hair remains on their head!

    "No worries!" Yeah, right! Also, those with thyroid hormone resistance need far more medication than others... they must be allowed to have what they need without doctors playing parent as they panic at the thought that we're taking too much and that will cause more problems. Really? What the hell could be worse than what many of us are going through right now!! All we want is to regain some normalcy in life. That can't be this hard, is it?

    No. It is not.

    Not even when it gets complicated. And it will because we age; we're under stress (inflammation and pain are enormous stressors alone); we have illness and many here take medications besides thyroid hormone for those illnesses -- many that are caused by under-treated hypothyroidism. Those medicines themselves can also cause a number of problems. High blood pressure and high cholesterol used to be tell-tale signs of a possible hypothyroid condition. Get the thyroid hormone working properly and the high BP and high cholesterol reverses on its own. Today, doctors quickly put you on unnecessary meds and given the chance, they never take you off of them!

    Proton inhibitors are killing us because the symptoms of too much acid are the same as too little acid! When we don't have enough stomach acid, that completely messes up everything! We cannot absorb the nutrients from foods if we cannot properly digest them. Lack of digestion leads to all sorts of problems. But the bottom line is that hypothyroidism causes a lack of stomach acid! Hypothyroidism slows down all the functions of the body. This is also why so many of us retain massive amounts of water. Don't give me a diuretic or a test for this or that, just give me enough of the appropriate thyroid hormone so that I may have it in every cell of my body. Then I won't need extra medicines!

    Like the one for frequent urination when trying to sleep. Duh! Called "nocturia," just a little investigating shows it too is caused by hypothyroidism. What is the reason for a physician not knowing that nocturia is caused by the very same malady for which you're being treated?! Because they don't read their briefs. They don't keep up on things like they should. They have become prescription writers for Big Pharma. Unfortunately, that's what most of them do best -- and we also know that their penmanship is probably not quite as bad as the prescription they're writing!

    All these connections. Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, even Alzheimer's and Dementia have been related to the often severe lack of thyroid hormone absorption. Sometimes vitamins are needed to get us to absorb our replacement hormones better. When is the last time a doctor mentioned vitamins? At least here, in the U.S. that just doesn't happen with the American Medical Association. You'd have to go to a naturpath or holistic doctor for that kind of commonsense!

    It's a nightmare. But what we know is what can empower us to find out more about our own body and then do something about it. If we're not getting enough thyroid hormone in our cells and tissues and our body is screaming for change... we no longer have to make do with that.

    We don't have to continue on the merry-go-round of seeing this doctor, then that one, then yet another for all sorts of symptoms we encounter -- because in all probability our hypothyroidism is causing them all. With knowledge we can figure it out ourselves.

    Doctors will never stop treating symptoms and just focus on the root of the problem! For if they do, the GP we know today will become a thing of the past. Most things we can figure out ourselves. We have the knowledge of the world at our fingertips. And we have people, like all of us, who share and ask and debate so that we all can be the better for it.

    And with that we too can be a part of changing the problems that plague outdated practices of conventional medicine that keep us all sick.

    Otherwise nothing will ever change and people will continue to suffer needlessly with under-treated and eventually debilitating symptoms of hypothyroidism.

    Forums like this one can help others find out how to help themselves! We are our only patient. I think we can handle it if we all stick together.

    Appreciating each and every one here!

    Hugs!

  • Great post, thanks x

  • I contacted a few local acupuncturists and none of them would consider treating anything other than muscular-skeletal problems. If anyone can recommend one in Merseyside / Lancashire, I'd be really grateful.

    I borrowed a neighbour's acupuncture books and noticed a lot of points in the feet so go for reflexology and find that helps.

  • Hi Babette,

    Take a look at the BAcC website, or ACMAC website for cheaper treatments at a multibed clinic. I know there's one of the latter in Birkenhead that a acupuncturist I know goes to for treatment. I needle myself, but it's nice to have points I can't reach done, as doing my spine is risky.

    I can't imagine who you spoke to, that refused, unless it was a physio? They only have 15 hours training, so it's hit & miss as to whether they get close to the correct point, & they're a lot less skilled, with no training in TCM diagnosis.

    Mel

  • That's great. Thanks Mel.

  • You're welcome!

    Did you find anyone near you?

    I know a lot of good practitioners around Manchester, where I did my training, if you're prepared to travel there, & one good'un in Preston. I plan to try the multibed in Birkenhead sometime soon.

    I do foot acupressure every night or morning, but it doesn't do the trick like a good needling. :)

    Mel

  • Hi Babette

    I'm in Warrington & used this guy a few years ago for back pain after a bad car accident. He was really good & noticed other issues that I had via reflexology & treated me with acupuncture (not thyroid related).

    Not sure if he would help but he is amazing, so might be worth a try.

    rudihenry.com/

    Let me know how you get on x

  • Thank you. It's great to have a recommendation.

  • I have extremely sensitive points in my shoulders that when pressed can bring me to my knees. Interesting it can be related to thyroid. I have had a painful neck on one side for 30 years, doing a shoulder check in the car means a full body twist, I have adapted by physical responses to cope. I had high hopes T3 with my T4 would help but it hasn't.

  • Adding t3 is not always a magic fix for a while, many people find they have to tweak the dose up very slowly at the start, split to taking several times a day etc How long have you been on it?

    I'm not on it myself (yet, endo has just suggested it) but I know it's a difficult drug to get right from talking to others.

  • If your Endo has suggested the use of T3, you are far more fortunate than you might think! Kudos for having an informed Endocrinologist. Starting T3 in small doses and increasing every few days (at 5 mcg increments or even every week) is the right thing to do to get a patient who is not responding to T4 optimally. T3 will get a patient where they need to be much faster than what is often the misery of waiting six weeks at a time before another dose change.

    We can have T4 in our bodies but that doesn't mean it is getting into our cells. Therefore TSH and other labs can appear fine but we are not! T3 gets into our cells because it doesn't depend on conversion from T4 to get there. A lack of stomach acid or vitamins keeps us from absorbing the nutrients which are vital for making that conversion. There are a number of reasons why we do not convert T4 to T3 optimally, if at all.

    While we're trying to figure out just what we can do to help with the hormonal conversions our bodies need to make, we can use the natural thyroid hormone, T3, and get there much sooner than later.

    It may seem on the surface to be difficult to handle, but in my experience it isn't -- not as long as the taker is methodical and consistent. With brain fog, we often forget what we have taken and when, or we tend to question ourselves. With T3, it is therefore wise and imperative to make note each and every time it is taken and the dose. Notes to what you've eaten and how you feel also are very helpful in getting you to where you need to be.

    I look at it as a clinical trial and even though I'm the only one participating, I take good notes!

    Hope this is of some help to you feeling better about a trial of T3.

    Hugs!

  • Thanks csmith, hopefully I'll get a trial but even though it's suggested in the endos letter I know it's a difficult drug to get prescribed now because of cost.

    Thank goodness for sites like these that connect us together. X

  • There are several points on the shoulders, most wouldn't treat the thyroid, which is why I'm curious to know which points were used & supposed to be specific.

    For your neck, try acupressure on LI-4 for the front & pain reduction, & SI-3 for the side & back of your neck.

    acutakehealth.com/portfolio...

    acutakehealth.com/portfolio...

    Do both sides.

    M*

  • Sorry don't mean to make light of your situation but your description if your shoulder pain reminded me if the "Vulcan death grip" by Spock in Star Trek :-) Xx

  • Sometimes Tuina feels like that! ;)

  • 22 months or so, now twice a day but three times from Jan when T4 may be taken off me mrsm49.

  • I had mega bad shoulder and neck pain for 30+ years. I now know my medication was too low, mainly low dose T4 which I now know I couldn't convert; or only 20 or 30mcg a day of T3. I'm now on 40mcg a day of T3 after fortunately finding an endo willing to increase it. Sadly he's gone off to research diabetes in Oxford. But my shoulder and neck pain have gone completely. So, in my own case, that points to too low dosage and therefore still low thyroid med for my body.

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