Can someone help with blood test results please

I have just had a blood test and am wondering if my thyroxin should be increased slightly as I have noticed I have put on a bit of weight recently, despite watching what I eat plus exercising every day. I have had an underactive thyroid since 1996 and have been on 100mg of Thyroxin for some years now. My latest results were:

TSH 4.5 (6 months ago this was 3.95)

T4 10.6 (6 months ago this was 9.5)

They have come back as 'normal' and I don't have a reference range.

Help!

6 Replies

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  • If you get a print-out from the surgery, the ranges should be on it. The fact that you are on levothyroxine and your TSH is 4.5 would suggest you need an increase .

    You are complaining of weight gain and that is common when kept 'within range' when on medication. This is a link:-

    web.archive.org/web/2010032...

  • That's great - many thanks - I'll ask for a print out.

  • Hi ovended,

    try this link to thyroid UK's diagram of blood test results - hopefully it should help.

    thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

    As Shaws said, your doc is required to give you a printout if you ask for it ( I jsut did this last week after 15 years of no clue :-) )

    The ranges should be on there - for example the "normal" ranges on mine for TSH were 0.27 - 4.20

    ug/L

    best of luck

    M

  • Great - many thanks. Interesting article and easy to follow too.

  • This is another excerpt. It's such a pity many of our medical professionals are completely unaware of:-

    Your Thyroid Hormone Product and Dosage:

    Are They Working for You?

    by Dr. John C. Lowe

    Troubled hypothyroid patients on T4-replacement often hear the same refrain from their conventional doctors: "Well, your TSH is in range. That means your aches, fatigue, mental fog, depression, and cold hands can't possibly have anything to do with your hypothyroidism."

    I know from one of the studies I mentioned in the section above that this refrain is a false one. The TSH level is simply grossly unreliable for gauging whether the thyroid hormone product a patient is using, or the dose he or she is on, is working well for him or her. For too many patients, the product or dose is failing to provide the patient with normal metabolism, body temperature, brain and heart function, and relief of symptoms.

    web.archive.org/web/2010103...

  • Thanks so much - it's such a complex area that it's a real shame that GPs aren't better aware.

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