Heart concerns

If there is anyone who might know about the effects anaemia has on the heart I would be very grateful for advice. Ivehad acute anaemia for two years and am on my 3rd week of B12 shots which has got rid of my pins and needles. I am still having heart pains though and they are more frequent. They are sometimes quite sharp and sometimes quite dull like its being gently squeezed. My iron count was 1 and my ferritin count was 2 at one point so my anaemia was severe.

When I get my B12 jab I can actually feel my blood circulating - is this normal?

9 Replies

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  • I understand what you mean ive just finised a 6 injections over two weeks last one was on friday last but since last monday ive had a pain in my chest.

  • Severe iron deficiency can cause tachycardia and severe chest pain. (Been there, done that...) Since your iron levels are practically non-existent your GP should be referring you for a very urgent blood transfusion and/or an iron infusion. You also need a referral to a gastroenterologist and/or a haemotologist to find out why you aren't absorbing iron.

  • grab yourself a jar of blackstrap molasses and take a teaspoon each day mixed with a little warm water . It is a good source of iron and has other vitamins and nutrient which are helpful including b6 and trimethylglycine which binds to homocysteine and helps the body get rid of it . Take some omega 3 and get some coq10 which helps to protect the heart .

  • In the last two weeks of gestation , a mothers body fills up the baby`s liver with blood and then the baby has to start producing it`s own fresh red blood cells . This process starts in the liver , moves over to the kidneys , then into the bone marrow and ends up finally at the liver again . If this mechanism is interrupted , the process becomes immature and effects the circulating iron and makes it hard for a baby to hang onto iron in their circulatory system particularly . It will cause blood cells to die off too quickly or they will not be fully formed or may be too small . One of the effects of having a long term low circulating iron level is that it will lead the body to start to use other metals to form blood cells , such as led and aluminum . If an iron deficiency is left long term along with long term vitamin b12 deficiency , this can actually alter DNA structure and can compromise myelin composition leading to MS . Eventually , the blood cells can start to change and become leukaemic . If you take b12 , take some iron in the form of blackstrap mollasses . The Blackstrap type has been boiled three times and starts to produce minerals and vitamins including iron and is a good source which is also gentle on the system . Take a t-spoon a day in warm water along with your b12 , then get some methylfolate added in and you should start to feel much better after a week or so .

  • Sorry, I'm going to have to ask you to explain this again -

    How can boiling anything three times make it produce minerals and vitamins? Any minerals present pre-boiling will be present in the exact same amounts post-boiling. And vitamins present pre-boiling will be destroyed by being boiled.

  • Jus-tine, I'm sure you'll get some good advice by the people on this website. Wish I could help myself but I don't have enough knowledge. All the best and I hope things get resolved soon.

  • Forget molasses and similar woo-woo. Follow humanbean's advice. Your iron and ferritin are very, very low. See a real doctor ASAP

  • Have you spoken to your GP about your heart pains today?

    nhs.uk/NHSEngland/AboutNHSs...

    This page suggests that people should ring 999 if they have a medical emergency.

    patient.info/doctor/Hypokal...

    Is your GP monitoring your potassium levels?

    Some people experience a drop in potassium levels (hypokalaemia) when they start to receive B12 and I think this can cause cause heart problems.

  • Low Potassium levels affect my heart.

    Otherwise all the problems I was having with it have resolved with B12 treatment.

    Please get things checked properly as a matter of urgency.

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