Testosterone test results: Hello I got a... - Pain Concern

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Testosterone test results

Healthfreak92
Healthfreak92
34 Replies

Hello I got a testosterone test and my results came back as 13.1 nmol/L which seem ridiculously low for my age.. I'm 27.. I was stunned when I was told that the results are within the normal range.. Maybe its within normal range when you compare me with an 80 year old man with diabetes!! Can someone please advise me if I need to investigate this any further? Thank you

34 Replies
oldestnewest
FRreedman

I would ask my GP for a full explanation of the results, because they seem to be on the very low side.

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Healthfreak92

Yes I agree thanks very much for the reply. Can you tell me if stress or depression can effect testosterone levels because I do suffer from that

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Sparkle44

Hi my testosterone levels dropped as low as 0.5 and a really useless consultant told me that women didn’t need testosterone! We absolutely do!! Take a look at my earlier posts for some helpful advice and symptoms. Low mood / depression / irritability can all be symptoms of low testosterone! You could ask you GP to do a full hormone blood test on you - ask them to test your DHEA / Free Androgen Index / and Testosterone. - it might be a Pituitary Gland issue which is you master gland regulating all your hormones. If there is an issue with your pituitary, for example making too much or not enough of Prolactin it can make you feel terrible - no energy! Foggy memory! My hair was dropping out / nails breaking / skin terrible / aches in the body / tingling of the skin / blurry vision etc!! There are REAL symptoms associated with low testosterone! The problem is to build your evidence base and then present this back to the GP and be persistent!!!

Even if they agree all the levels are low and they send you to Endocrinology they are worse than useless!! This is a good site for support.

I have been on DHEA which they don’t like to give out as apparently there is no evidence that increasing testosterone levels has a benefit! I came off the DHEA as my issue was fatigue and to be fair the medication made no difference.

I am now on Bromocriptine for a pituitary adenoma (benign Tumor) I was on Cabergoline but gained weight! These drugs have some horrible side effects risks so they prefer not to issue them.

Incidentally I am 46 and I am not evenP peri-menopausal as they checked.

Low testosterone can make you feel terrible! Hope this helps!

Wendy x

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Healthfreak92

I hope you get it sorted Wendy.. Keep me updated with what the doctor says. I've been told I'm in the normal range and I've had a full hormone tested. My free testosterone reads at 0.271 my Shbg is 30.2 and my Free Androgen Index reads 43.38.. I don't even know what this means.

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BadHare
BadHare
in reply to Sparkle44

Hi Wendy,

I have a pituitary tumour too. Undiagnosed despite symptoms from childhood. I’ve learned much from The Pituitary Foundation, but most from Thyroid UK’s forum on here, especially with regard to the micronutrient hormone cofactors which are the same for any endocrine issue or any good health. I now self medicate for secondary hypothyroidism, & have no respect whatsoever for the numerous different endocrinologists I’ve seen who do not even vaguely understand this or any pituitary conditions. Despite being so common, they don’t understand hypothyroidism either.

Sigh...

Mel

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FRreedman

Yes, if anything (mentally or physically) upsets you, it can affect your levels.

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Healthfreak92

No problem mate thank you. I'll try relax more and get retested after a month or so

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taji
taji
in reply to Healthfreak92

Are you on predinisolone? If so there are many studies that show long term steroid use reduces testosterone levels quite considerably.

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Healthfreak92
Healthfreak92
in reply to taji

I'm not on any medication. I don't drink or smoke. And my diet is healthy enough. I'm guessing there's no point going to my gp as my levels are technically on the normal scale?

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Sparkle44

If your testosterone level is on the low normal side but you are feeling symptomatic don’t give up on seeking help. I just posted a symptoms checklist so take a look 🤗 concerning the other hormones you had tested ask for the normal reference ranges to check how low or high they are.

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Healthfreak92

Thanks sparkle I'll definitely take a look at that thanks

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RonSton7

No there's not much point speaking to your GP if your levels are in normal range. Generally it's 8 or below for trt to be considered in UK. Mine were around 5 to 7 and a couple of GPS were hesitant to refer me to an endocrinologist until they were convinced the symptoms of low testosterone were problematic. The GP was of the belief that low testosterone on its own would not necessarily be a problem. But I was 35 and I was tired all the time, now been on a test gel for 4 years and it seems to help

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Healthfreak92

Do you think I should look into getting the test gel? It's available online without the need of a prescription? I read that testosterone replacement can increase the risk of heart attacks.

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RonSton7

Generally speaking no, as far as I know its not available legally without a prescription? How many tests have you had? Was the test done first thing in the morning? What symptoms are you experiencing that you think are related to your testosterone levels?

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Healthfreak92

You can get it online.. And lack of motivation tiredness but the main problem is my sex drive its non existent. I took the test at around 11am

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RonSton7

Your test result isn't that low, so I'm not sure taking testosterone is going to address those if I'm honest. I certainly wouldn't make any decision based on one test result - generally testosterone replacement is a permanent thing, means being on it for the rest of your life. If you are still concerned I would repeat the test as early in the morning as possible, that's supposed to be when levels are highest and gives the best marker of where you are at

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Healthfreak92

OK I wil test it again next month to see if it's improved any. Fingers crossed..

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BadHare

Lots of things including stress & depression can affect our hormones. It’s a vicious cycle of deficiency (or excess) as our endocrine (hormone) system is closed. This means one imbalance can have a domino effect & impact other hormones negatively. Stress causes issues with the adrenal glands. Constant overproduction stress hormone adrenaline when not needed for its fight or flight purpose is very unhealthy as is deficient or excess of cortisol. It could be somewhere else in your body such as an autoimmune issue causing your problem.

Take a very good look at your lifestyle, especially with regard to your diet. It only takes one macronutrient (protein, fat, carbohydrate) or micronutrient (minerals & vitamins) to throw a spanner into any one of our hormones with subsequent ill effects. How is your digestion & gut health? This is so important for our immune & hormone system, & connected to mental functioning via our vagus nerve.

Good quality sleep is also essential. Stress, deficient nutrients, poor diet, etc, affects our hormones.

I have a relative (amongst many with hormone issues in my family) who was very ill for several years due to low testosterone (hypogonadism). He’s now treated with daily testosterone gel, though for years the condition was exacerbated by prescription antidepressants which are amongst many medications that are known to really **** up our bodies.

Testosterone is highly restricted due to abuse & dangerous effects of overuse. However there are lots of things you can do to help yourself if your GP won’t. Perhaps ask for a referral to see an endocrinologist who understands hypogonadism as most are clueless about anything other than diabetes. If your GP continues to be unhelpful or obstructive, I strongly suggest seeing someone different at your practice or registering with a different surgery.

I follow a couple of functional medicine practitioners who provide lifestyle & dietary advice regarding how to best manage chronic health conditions. In a nutshell, eating healthy foods & cutting out all processed crap can do wonders to help our wellbeing. It could be beneficial to you to whilst you’re waiting for medical help or even avoid the need for supplementary hormones. Chris Kresser has excellent free advice, as does Mark Hyman. There are lots of other free websites such as Healthline & Men’s health. Read through the advice & info supplements that you might be low on which seem viable, but avoid anything trying to sell you any quick fixes. See if there are any specific hypogonadism groups on HU you could join, or forums elsewhere.

I’ve had to get to grips with my own hormone issues which went undetected & scuppered my health for 40 years. One thing especially that I can confirm now is our doctors, even consultants, are pretty ignorant & can be obstructive it even vindictive if their lack of knowledge is questioned.

Feel free to ask in here or private message if you don’t understand what I’ve written or if you want more help.

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Healthfreak92

Thanks a lot for all that information I appreciate it. I'll have a look Into that

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Osidge

My testosterone was 7.9 when I was referred to an endocrinologist. He arranged a full pituitary panel pituitary.org.uk/informatio...

This indicated that it was only my testosterone that was low. I had a pituitary MRI which did not indicate a tumour but that my pituitary gland was smaller than expected. I was diagnosed with secondary hypogonadism and begun on 11 weekly injections of testosterone undecanoate. I am monitored annually immediately prior to an injection. Supplementation will continue forever. Ceasing it risks osteoporosis. Sadly the therapy is not kind to the size of your testicles!!

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Healthfreak92

Do you think the testosterone replacement works? And do you think my results are anything to worry about?

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Osidge

It certainly does work. I was just at the level of being abnormal when diagnosed. My trough level just before an injection is now around 13. Testosterone replacement therapy is not without its risks so I would advise other ways of looking at the issues you are putting at the door of your testosterone level. Have you had your thyroid function tested?

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Healthfreak92

I would love to find another way but 13.1 for a 27 year old is just on the low side. I don't smoke or drink so that isn't the cause. No I haven't had that checked

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BadHare

My thyroid function was in doctors "normal" range despite most hypothyroid symptoms, & a few peculiarities which I still can't explain. Medical normal can be on a different normal to patients' experience & perspective. Sad for us that doctors no longer recieve symptom diagnostic training, & shameful that are clueless when it comes to lab result interpretation in response to reported health issues.

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BadHare
BadHare
in reply to Osidge

It also causes low/infertility, though I was told this can be reversed by ceasing treatment if the person can bear hypogonadism symptoms temporarily whilst sperm production redevelops. Is this different with treatments as you inject rather than use daily gel? Do you notice health changes when your jabs wear off, or are they frequent enough not to notice?

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Osidge
Osidge
in reply to BadHare

The injections were the preferred route of my endocrinologist. My levels at trough are sufficient so that I do not notice.

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BadHare

ps Get a printout if your results including the lab ranges.

Ask for thorough micronutrient testing & if your GP won’t agree, consider private blood tests. Whilst you’re not hypothyroid, you can still join the Thyroid UK forum for hormone info & look out for the regular discount codes for blood tests with trusted companies.

The essential things that are tested are vitamin D, B12 & folate (though all B’s are essential), iron, & ferritin which is the iron storage protein in our blood. There’s more, but I can’t remember. 🙃

I can’t afford the blood tests top of my meds & supplements, but really wish I’d had more baseline tests before I’d started. I do know my vitamin D was very low, also iron & ferritin. D is an essential prohormone that’s needed for all hormonal function, our immune system & every cellular function. Lack of it causes health havoc including depression & hormone deficiency. As well as the hormones I buy, I take daily B complex, D3 (cholecalciferol) chelated or magnesium bisglycinate, iron sulphate or bisglycinate (with fruit for vitamin C to enhance absorption), mineral complex without calcium, & inject B12 weekly. I’m pedantic about taking meds, supplements & food appropriately to get most benefit or I’d be wasting lot of money & making myself really ill again.

Don’t be tempted by a multivitamin complex. Some vitamins are water or fat soluble so need to be taken independently, ie, D3 should taken with fatty foods for best absorption & >4 hours away from oral hormone tablets. Lots of minerals clash & can block the absorption of each other, ie, calcium blocks iron & magnesium, magnesium blocks iron. Tannins in tea & coffee, block all sorts of nutrients. It’s complicated initially, but manageable once routine. Writing down a plan helps at first. I don’t stress if I forget one thing a day or slip up as long as I remember the most important hormones first thing &?drink only water for the next few hours.

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Osidge
Osidge
in reply to BadHare

I don’t think that the OP has mentioned that he does not have hypothyroidism. He could also ensure a good diet that is rich in vitamins of varying kinds.

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Healthfreak92

I've never been tested for that. But as far as I'm aware I don't have hypothyroidism

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Osidge

Tiredness can be a symptom of hypothyroidism.

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Healthfreak92

I do take a multi vitamin supplement every day and a vitamin d supplement

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BadHare

Maybe assess your diet for what you actually need & take these separately. Also make sure it's D3 you take as D2 is useless & potentially harmful.

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Healthfreak92

Thank you

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BadHare

You're welcome!

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