A Question from someone struggling

Sorry folks I have'nt earned the right to be in here and should'nt be posting here at all I just hope the moderators will forgive me and allow it to stay.

Reading through a lot of your old posts I see that like me many of you tried to quit several times before you seemd to have your epiphany and somehow find the ability to get off the fags for good .

My question is this , can any of you work out the difference that made your final quit stick so you did'nt fall back ?

Thanks in advance I wont post here again unless I earn the right but I will look in for any helpful answers.

Barrie.

Starting yet again.

18 Replies

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  • Hi Barrie,

    As far as I know there's no rule against posting in any section, so long as the post is relevant to that section.

    Happy to hear you're interested in what made people tilt!

    In my case it was for medical reasons. I had a deep-vein thrombosis and a pulmonary embolism. I figured I could either quit or continue playing Russian roulette. As simple as that, although I will concede that some people continue smoking no matter what. I prefer to be in control of my life.

    Alex.

  • Hi Barrie not on here often but pop in now and again. My reason for quitting was my brother died age 45 massive heart attack, it was a big wake up call I was 8 years older, It took me a year and it was my first real attempt, I had tried before just for a day maybe but didn't really want to, this time I did you have to really want to then it can be done. I wish you all the best this forum really helped me hope it will help you too.

    Maria.:)

  • Hi Barrie,

    As far as I know there's no rule against posting in any section, so long as the post is relevant to that section.

    Happy to hear you're interested in what made people tilt!

    In my case it was for medical reasons. I had a deep-vein thrombosis and a pulmonary embolism. I figured I could either quit or continue playing Russian roulette. As simple as that, although I will concede that some people continue smoking no matter what. I prefer to be in control of my life.

    Alex.

    Thanks Alex I hope your health has improved as a result of quitting. I know what you mean though we have all seen people with acute emphasema pulling their mask aside to smoke. I used to think they must be mad but I find it so hard to quit maybe now I can understand them a little better.

  • Hi Barrie, I could go on forever about the reasons I quit,

    I think a combination of the right mind set and being ready to quit.

    Also my aunt recently died of liver cancer after smoking all of her life and my mother having had a recent heart scare probably triggered this quit for me.

    Rob

  • Hi Barrie, I agree with Rob it about the right mindset and desire to stop. My sister was diagnosed with Emphysema and that did it for me! I couldnt keep smoking knowing that I potentially could get it too!

  • Hi I quit as there was a few of my family members who were doing it. So I didn't wZnt to be the only smoker. They all failed but me so I'm a line quitter now

    I also wanted give up as I'm 29 with reSlky bad circulation in my hands and feet. And I the heart palpitations are very scary.

    Although my hands have warned up now. The palps are still here twice as worse as a smoker. So maybe iv a underlining Heath proplem?

  • I know what you mean though we have all seen people with acute emphasema pulling their mask aside to smoke.

    What an utterly insane image.......thanks though Barrie, shows where this cr*p leads if you don't sort it out........

  • What an utterly insane image.......thanks though Barrie, shows where this cr*p leads if you don't sort it out........

    Sadly, we don't have enough knowledge of what happens to some people as a result of smoking, or we conveniently choose to ignore it.

    Steve - Throat Cancer

    Alex.

  • Just don't wait for the right moment because it doesn't come :)

    Karri nailed it. You can always make excuses and wait for the "right" time to quit, but it will NEVER come. Eventually you have to decide to bite the bullet.

    For me personally, it was Allan Carr's book (and this forum). I used to think I enjoyed smoking, but he explains so well that what I was enjoying was the relief of coming out of withdrawal every couple of hours or so.

    So I think education and good old perserverance is the key. It's not easy, but it's also not as hard as you might think.

  • My question is this , can any of you work out the difference that made your final quit stick so you did'nt fall back ?

    It's fear that keeps folks from sticking to their quit and it's fear why they postpone starting another quit. Fear that life will never be the same again, fear that the magical gifts they think smoking gives them will forever be taken from them. This mental anxiety is the nicotine trap. I think most people who are successful in the end have come to the understanding that their fear is based on lies... they understand that cigarettes have no magical qualities at all. They give you nothing but stress and disease. It's understanding this that gives you a chance to walk away from them. You get pissed off that you've been tricked all your smoking days and you accept the fact that you have to go through a temporary healing phase that may or may not be challenging. When you realize the freedom you get back you simply never look back.... why would you? To pay to smell, be controlled by nicotine all day long, to invite disease into your body? Nicotine addiction is mostly mental, once you learn the truth, it's pretty easy to kick it.

  • Not everyone has an epiphany, & those who do all have different stories & experiences. For me, it was watching others who didn't smoke. Being envious of how they could go all day without having to make time to smoke. Without making trips especially to buy fags because they'd ran out. Not having to stand in the pissing rain to get their levels up, & not having to do without things because they needed to keep money aside for smokes. They don't even think about it, cigarettes are a complete non-entity to them.

    I envied them, then i realised that i'd been one of them for 20 years. But how could i quit? How could i do without now that i've had a taste? I love smoking, don't i?

    Well... no, i don't. I use it as a pastime, despite it being completely uninteresting. I use it as a reward, despite it making me feel & smell like a tramp & i use it to destress, despite the fact that withdrawal from it caused most of the stress in the first place.

    I'd look at prices of things & think, "I'm not paying that!" then go buy fags for £8 instead & set fire to them.

    So i just thought, "F this" & binned them one morning before i went to work. What was the worst that could happen? I'd be irritable, angry & annoying but that's it. I wasn't gonna die from it, so bring it on.

    Tackled each craving as it came, & took a deep breath & a moment to tell myself why i was feeling like i was & it soon passed. Eventually, they died down to a shadow of their former selves. Then one day you wake up & realise that they've gone.

  • It's fear that keeps folks from sticking to their quit and it's fear why they postpone starting another quit. Fear that life will never be the same again, fear that the magical gifts they think smoking gives them will forever be taken from them. This mental anxiety is the nicotine trap. I think most people who are successful in the end have come to the understanding that their fear is based on lies... they understand that cigarettes have no magical qualities at all. They give you nothing but stress and disease. It's understanding this that gives you a chance to walk away from them. You get pissed off that you've been tricked all your smoking days and you accept the fact that you have to go through a temporary healing phase that may or may not be challenging. When you realize the freedom you get back you simply never look back.... why would you? To pay to smell, be controlled by nicotine all day long, to invite disease into your body? Nicotine addiction is mostly mental, once you learn the truth, it's pretty easy to kick it.

    Very well said.:)

  • Not everyone has an epiphany, & those who do all have different stories & experiences. For me, it was watching others who didn't smoke. Being envious of how they could go all day without having to make time to smoke. Without making trips especially to buy fags because they'd ran out. Not having to stand in the pissing rain to get their levels up, & not having to do without things because they needed to keep money aside for smokes. They don't even think about it, cigarettes are a complete non-entity to them.

    I envied them, then i realised that i'd been one of them for 20 years. But how could i quit? How could i do without now that i've had a taste? I love smoking, don't i?

    Well... no, i don't. I use it as a pastime, despite it being completely uninteresting. I use it as a reward, despite it making me feel & smell like a tramp & i use it to destress, despite the fact that withdrawal from it caused most of the stress in the first place.

    I'd look at prices of things & think, "I'm not paying that!" then go buy fags for £8 instead & set fire to them.

    So i just thought, "F this" & binned them one morning before i went to work. What was the worst that could happen? I'd be irritable, angry & annoying but that's it. I wasn't gonna die from it, so bring it on.

    Tackled each craving as it came, & took a deep breath & a moment to tell myself why i was feeling like i was & it soon passed. Eventually, they died down to a shadow of their former selves. Then one day you wake up & realise that they've gone.

    Another excellent post. There are some very inspirational people on this forum.

  • Love

    Sorry folks I have'nt earned the right to be in here and should'nt be posting here at all I just hope the moderators will forgive me and allow it to stay.

    Reading through a lot of your old posts I see that like me many of you tried to quit several times before you seemd to have your epiphany and somehow find the ability to get off the fags for good .

    My question is this , can any of you work out the difference that made your final quit stick so you did'nt fall back ?

    Thanks in advance I wont post here again unless I earn the right but I will look in for any helpful answers.

    Barrie.

    Starting yet again.

    My final stick was looking at my Granddaughters...and falling for someone

    who does NOT smoke....I want to live for them. No regrets..no looking back..

    smoking...LOVED IT...but its not for me anymore..I want to live as I was

    born to live..smoke FREE! Take care!

  • Many Thanks

    Great messages thank you all in particular Mr E you are so right whats the worst than can happen lol. Hey I can be annoying and irritable anyway so I may just as well go for it :). I am currently only 3 days clean and to be honest feeling no benefits whatsoever. BUT I am not going to smoke today, thats all I commit to so its not so scarey . :) Thanks again for all your help , really :)

  • I constantly told myself that during a craving. "What's the worst thing that can possibly happen if i don't smoke? And what's the worst thing that can possibly happen if i do?"

    The benefits are gradual. It's like when you start smoking, the damage doesn't happen instantly, it creeps up on you over time. The repair is the same, but it will come.

    The first few days are the hardest, so you're doing really well. It really is the best thing anyone can do for their health, wealth & general wellbeing. The benefits are many & the drawbacks? Well, there aren't any.

  • My desire to not smoke outweighed my desire to smoke, I had quit several times before but not because I didn't want to smoke but because I felt I shouldn't.

    This time I didn't want to smoke so I didn't x

  • Sorry folks I have'nt earned the right to be in here and should'nt be posting here at all I just hope the moderators will forgive me and allow it to stay.

    Reading through a lot of your old posts I see that like me many of you tried to quit several times before you seemd to have your epiphany and somehow find the ability to get off the fags for good .

    My question is this , can any of you work out the difference that made your final quit stick so you did'nt fall back ?

    Thanks in advance I wont post here again unless I earn the right but I will look in for any helpful answers.

    Barrie.

    Starting yet again.

    The key to quitting for me was to get to the stage that I truly hated smoking and despised being caught in a trap that controlled me and not the other way round. It makes it a lot easier to not be tempted to take just one puff if you truly do not feel like you are missing out or depriving yourself of something to be desired.

    I downloaded several ebooks and read through those in the first two weeks of my quit, they are linked in my signature and they helped immensely....by the time I was done reading them I was through the worst of it.

    Though I had some tough times in the early days now I couldn't imagine myself ever smoking again. I hope that helps :)

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