Healthy fats?: Just wondering which fats are... - Weight Loss NHS

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Healthy fats?

Janechic
JanechicRestart Jan 2020

Just wondering which fats are considered healthy.

The keto diet recommends high fat and protein with some vegetables but is this really healthy?

I like butter and cheese but wondered if eating these each day would result in healthy fat loss.

Please can you advise

Love and hugs xxx

16 Replies
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Diane2
Diane2Administrator

Here is some advice on LCHF to look at for now, will try and retrieve link on fats specifically asap

dietdoctor.com/low-carb

Janechic
JanechicRestart Jan 2020
in reply to Diane2

Thank you xx

Diane2
Diane2Administrator
in reply to Janechic

Hi there is a specific group on the HU site focused on LCHF so you might benefit from looking at that to look at views about fats and decide what suits you and obviously liaise with GP especially if you have health issues . All best

healthunlocked.com/lchf-diet

TheAwfulToad
TheAwfulToadAmbassador

Yes, it is healthy. The dietetic establishment has spent billions on research funding over the last 50 years or so in an attempt to prove that fats are bad for you. They have been unable to do so (they have, inadvertently, been doing some good science: the experiments they designed showed conclusively that the hypothesis is incorrect, or at least incomplete).

The reason LCHF works, in fact, is that it is inherently healthy. Healthy bodies do not get fat. Fat bodies that are taken off the harmful low-fat, high-carb diet and given proper food, with adequate fat content, start to discard the useless bodyfat that they've accumulated.

If you browse through the websites of the nutrition Establishment, you'll notice that they've all revised their position on fat. They're now stating (correctly) that fats are an essential macronutrient and that the science hasn't shown any cause-effect relationship between dietary fat and disease ... but we should all still be eating less fat. Figure that one out.

babss
babss3 stone

Completely agree with all the above. I would just add that one key thing to remember, which seems obvious but I think is sometimes missed, is that we need to eat until we are satisfied but not more. So LCHF isn’t a licence to eat mountains of cheese, for example.

Unhealthy fats are those that are modified, such as transfats or some vegetable oils-if you stick with the natural stuff you’ll be fine!

Good luck

TheAwfulToad
TheAwfulToadAmbassador
in reply to babss

Indeed. I think a lot of people are so used to the idea that we have to measure everything out and meter it into our bodies that they struggle with the idea of just eating until they've had enough (and no more).

I suspect there are people out there who have spent so many years on and off low-calorie diets that they've forgotten what "full" feels like :)

Worth pointing out that even though it's called "low carb high fat", most people eating this way aren't eating a great deal of fat, in absolute terms. Of course, in comparison with the close-to-zero fat diet recommended by the experts, almost anything looks like high-fat.

I'll also add that the keto phase of LCHF doesn't usually last long (mostly because it's boring!). You might spend two or three weeks eating quite a lot of fat. After that, your appetite pushes you away from it - you just don't want so much of it.

babss
babss3 stone
in reply to TheAwfulToad

Completely agree. I think of the “high fat” as relating to the proportion of your energy that comes from fat rather than what is on your plate (which in my case is predominantly vegetables)

TheAwfulToad
TheAwfulToadAmbassador
in reply to babss

>> which in my case is predominantly vegetables

I like to annoy the vegans in the other forums by claiming that my diet is "whole food plant-based (WFPB)". Because it is!

babss
babss3 stone
in reply to TheAwfulToad

😂

StillConcerned
StillConcernedAmbassador

The healthiest fats are natural fats that emulate the proportions of our body-fat; 57% monounsaturates, 40% saturates and just 3% EFAs.

If you look at the animal kingdom, you will see examples such as gorillas that were brought into captivity and fed on a vegetarian diet, yet got heart disease. That happened because they weren't fed enough fibrous food and instead had too much fruit.

Before you start thinking that means we should eat lots of fibrous food, you need to know that the fibrous carbohydrates gorillas eat in the wild are converted to fat by bacteria in their huge hind guts. We don't have those huge hind guts by design; we're meant to eat the majority of our energy from natural fat, the very foods we've been scared away from that satiate us without stretching our stomach.

We don't need to avoid carbohydrate, but less than half the RDA is sufficient for most people, and the RI for protein is only 50g per day.

I stick to the advice given here: health.harvard.edu/staying-...

Butter and cheese are great choices, just ensure that it obtained from organic, grass fed animals. Not processed.

Hello : )

I have just started the keto challenge on diet doctor and the scales have started moving downwards. I have tried almost everything else to lose weight. Its insane!

TheAwfulToad
TheAwfulToadAmbassador
in reply to KitchenPhoenix

Nah ... it's everyone else who's insane ;)

StillConcerned
StillConcernedAmbassador
in reply to KitchenPhoenix

Don't be lulled into a false sense. If you cut back carbohydrate sufficiently, you will exhaust your body's glycogen reserves which are about a pound in weight. You will also lose the water retained by that glycogen, which will account for another four pounds.

That's not a bad thing per se, but it pays to be aware because if you were to have more carbohydrate you could easily replace some of the lost glycogen along with water and wonder where that weight regain had come from?

Also, cutting back too far can leave some people feeling lethargic/depleted, and lower metabolic rate.

Don't let this discourage you. Most people need less than half the RDA of carbohydrate. If people realised this, so that when they have chocolate or mince pie they know they have had enough carbohydrate for whole or part of a meal, the UK would be a much healthier place.

Lesley1234567
Lesley1234567Maintainer

Just to add it is so easy to maintain. It’s not a diet.

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