Do you ferment?: I've been listening into a... - Healthy Eating

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Do you ferment?

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator

I've been listening into a fermentation workshop this week (anyone else?) it's been really interesting, and I've learned lots!

So the question is, do you ferment, and if so, what do you make?

32 Replies

Hi Cooper27

It's great that you attended a fermentation workshop. Are you intending to start fermenting anything?

I used to make my own yoghurt, in the past, but not for a few years. I have thought about fermenting some sauer kraut, but never got round to actually doing it, and I have also considered Kefir, but again - not got around to it.

I shall be following the replies of your post with interest - to see what others have fermented.

Zest :-)

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to Zest

I've made sauerkraut, it's pretty easy to do, but I know what you mean about getting round to it!

I'm pretty new to fermenting, so I've only done kombucha, water kefir and sauerkraut. The workshop is inspiring me to try making my own ginger ale, and I'm hoping to try some nut cheese :)

Zest profile image
Zest in reply to Cooper27

Oooh, the thought of some Nut cheese and a cooling glass of Ginger ale - that sounds perfect to me just now! :-)

Zest :-)

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to Zest

Even better if I pop the nut cheese on a pizza ;)

Zest profile image
Zest in reply to Cooper27

That does sound tasty too. :-)

Kim Chi - I love it especially now I can’t eat pickles due to a hernia 😀

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to PurpleAlf

I need to work up to kimchi I think, I'm glad to hear you enjoy it and that it's gentle on the digestion!

Headline health benefits of fermenting please! Will is make me thin?

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to

It can help with weight loss - fermented foods are full of good bacteria, which are nature's probiotics. There are some studies out there that show overweight people tend to have less gut bacteria diversity, while those people who can eat anything and never gain weight tend to have very good bacteria diversity. In fact, there were some studies out there that showed implanting gut bacteria from a healthy normal weight person into the overweight person, resulted in weight loss.

While eating probiotic foods isn't a magic fix, and doesn't guarantee weight loss, it's worth trying. It won't work if you have an overall unhealthy diet and only add some sauerkraut on the side.

in reply to Cooper27

Done a bit of googling on it - not like me to miss s health trend! According to Scientific American (a credible source I feel), there is no benefit to normally healthy people but worth a short course of probiotics after antibiotics. I often take antibiotics as I have weak lungs, so will swap to probiotic greek yoghurt for a bit (very expensive so not going to be a long term thing.) I guess the question is whether very overweight people fall into the category of normally healthy.

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to

This is a clinical trial into it:

clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show...

in reply to Cooper27

That’s really helpful Cooper28, the trial is specifically related to obese people. The ScAm research indicated that healthy people would not get benefits - but obese is not healthy. Although I have weight to lose, I am not obese. So a couple of weeks if kefir, and then I think i’ll be fine 😁

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator

Thank-you for sharing your recipe! Do you know if a regular tea towel might work if you can't find a cheesecloth?

Wine 🤣

Beer but not in this heat to hot for the yeast

flicky1 profile image
flicky1 in reply to Mervh

My bullace wine is still happily bubbling in the kitchen, despite the heat. :)

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator

That's a really good idea! I don't drink coffee myself, but I may be able to steal one from work, I'll have a snoop when the office is quieter ;)

Elisabeth3 profile image
Elisabeth3 in reply to Cooper27

I thought cheese cloth is something I would hardly ever use. But when I bought it, I found it really cool. I use it for cheese mainly. But one can use for jam, syrup, etc.

Dear Cooper27,

I KNOW that this, very definitely ISN'T, the answer that you are after BUT.....I'm sure when I have had, far too much to eat, 'washed it down' with 'one too many Beers', and then Sprawled myself, in my favourite chair.....YES I FERMENT! (Well it 'Sounds' like it anyway....)

Please Don't be offended, by my 'Brash' Sense Of Humour Cooper, there are Times- and this IS one of them- when I just can't help myself.....Sorry!

On a more Serious note, for real this time, IF you are 'Prone' to Yeast Infections, Candida, Thrush, Athletes Foot or, particularly in the case of a Female, infections of the Genitalia- then Fermented Foods would NOT be a good idea. NOT AT ALL! These Conditions, are actually Caused by Yeast....The same 'Thing' that Does the Fermenting. I also WOULDN'T recommend it for 'Immune Suppressed' individuals either, which could, very well, be a LOT of us. Those taking Prednisolone, MFM, Cyclophosphamide, Rituximab indeed ANY Immuno- depressant, should also be VERY careful- at the least Speak to your Doctor(s).

Sorry to pour Cold Water on your, no doubt, Good intentions Cooper- I honestly DO understand your 'Good Intent' and I'm sure that you understand where I'm 'Coming From here. Rather like 'Pro/ Pre Biotics', Digestion Supplements, and the 'Like' we, really DO, have to be careful. CAREFUL, you understand, I DON'T completely preclude them I merely suggest- in the Strongest terms- consulting YOUR Doctors first.

Some Specific 'Supplements' are necessary, when I was on Dialysis- which I was for four years- I was given 'Dialavite', a supplement specifically designed for Dialysis Patients.

Wishing you well, no honestly.

AndrewT

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to AndrewT

Thanks for the warning!

Well I'm sure from the amount of olives I just ate, I'm probably pickling from the salt, so there's no judgement here :D

I've been working with a nutritionist on the fermentation stuff - she did get me to cut them out for a bit due to hayfever (histamine etc), but that's been getting better, and so I'm hoping to increase them a little bit. I'm not likely to ever eat a lb of kimchi a day at least! But I will be careful of the risks you've mentioned as I do increase them.

I make whey this way:

Heat milk.

Pull aside.

Add spices of your choice, garlic, rosemary, thyme, etc.

Leave it to absorb, for at least half an hour.

Filter out the spices.

Heat (bring to nearly boil) milk again. Add salt and lemon juice (a lot) or vinegar.

Leave it to cool, stir gently occasionally.

When ready, strain.

Up ricotta, down whey.

Fermenting food is a good and healthy method. Because little or no heat, vitamin C doesn't decompose. Hence, in the past, people took Sauerkraut to long sea journies and ate it in winter.

I ferment, not very often I must say, though:

Sour dough

Sauerkraut

Pickled gherkin

Pickled grape leaves

Milk

I've been thinking about making my own fermented sauerkraut - does anyone have a (very!) foolproof recipe they would like to share? Great post Cooper - thanks for reminding me that I need to give this a go ... !

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to rachelleigh

Top tip is to store your cabbage at room temperature before you start. It dries out in the fridge. Also hold onto one cabbage leaf.

1. Thinly slice the cabbage (I use the food processor for this) and add to a bowl

2. sprinkle in 1-2tsp of salt (I overdid the salt first time, because I thought 1-2tsp must have been a mis-spelling, but it's plenty)

3. Massage the salt into the cabbage until it's released a reasonable amount of liquid (might take 5 minutes)

4. Move cabbage to a kilner jar

5. Cut the retained cabbage leaf to the shape of the jar, place over the top of the kraut. I then add a little glass pudding dish (gu pudding type) on top and close the lid (the by dish should just fit and no more, so it presses it down).

Leave in a cool cupboard for a week or longer, until it's the sort of taste you like. I usually Ned about 2 weeks. In the heat just now it'd probably need less time. Move to the fridge when it's ready.

rachelleigh profile image
rachelleigh in reply to Cooper27

Brilliant - thanks again - you're a star on this forum! I don't think even I could mess this up ... 😂

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to rachelleigh

No problem! I should add to be sure the cabbage is fully submerged under liquid, and that you press it down to push out all the air bubbles. If you need to add a couple of tbsp of water to cover it, then sprinkle a couple more grains of salt in too.

There's videos on YouTube if you need help :)

rachelleigh profile image
rachelleigh in reply to Cooper27

Thanks again - if I get the hang of it I'll save myself a fortune - I'm currently buying it online - it's an expensive bit of cabbage!

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to rachelleigh

I know! I was buying jars for about £4 a time! I discovered Polish food shops often sell much larger bags, a little bit cheaper though, so if you do need to buy any, it's worth finding one of them :)

rachelleigh profile image
rachelleigh in reply to Cooper27

Top tip! Thanks again x

Yoghurt is good in case of Candida infection. The good bacteria crowd out the one responsible for infection.

Kefir and Sauerkraut are also good.

Hi Cooper27

minimalist baker has a 2 ingredient coconut yogurt very nice i have tried it

if you google minimalist baker coconut yogurt you will get the recipe.

minimalistbaker.com/easy-2-...

Cooper27 profile image
Cooper27Administrator in reply to learn-2016

That sounds delicious! Thanks for sharing! I will definitely give it a try :)

I also happen to need some yoghurt for cheese making, so this is win/win!

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