Preventing diabetes and best practice for p... - Healthy Eating

Healthy Eating
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Preventing diabetes and best practice for pre-diabetes. 💚

Good morning everyone,

There are some simple steps we can take to avoid diabetes like stopping smoking reducing alcohol consumption coupled with a healthy diet and plenty of exercise. Just taking some simple steps like having poached eggs instead of fried eggs can reduce the saturated fat content by 50%. And avoiding fried food in general.

We all know someone with diabetes and it is a growing problem with some likening it to an epidemic with rising obesity levels and type 2 diabetes. it was on the news recently that children as young as 7 have mental health issues due to their obesity! This is bonkers as 7 year olds should be getting plenty of exercise but instead are unhappy and unhealthy because of their life style of too much sugary food and not enough exercise.

In England and Wales alone one person is diagnosed with type2D every 3 minutes this is a shocking statistic.

Here's advice by Diabetes UK on pre-diabetes and diabetes prevention.

Please see:

diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-pre...

Remember prevention is much better than a cure...

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I was talking to my dad at the weekend, who said the thing he finds influences his diabetes results more than anything, is getting lots of exercise, so I highly recommend it :) he's retired now, so spends a lot of his days in the garden.

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Thanks Cooper27, I agree that exercise is great for reversing and preventing diabetes in the first place so I'm very pleased that your dad benefits from having exercise it's also good for the soul to get out in nature if we can.

So good for your dad and I'm so glad he enjoys his garden as it sounds very therapeutic to me. 😊

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Please at least read the link below before telling people to restrict their fat intake

phcuk.org/wp-content/upload...

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Hi cheritorrox, I am not saying go on a low fat diet as eggs contain healthy saturated fat I was making the point of cooking them in a healthy manner.

I think another good example of foods to avoid if over weight are things like doughnuts which are full of sugar and deep fried. So again contain saturated fats.

Something has gone badly wrong with life style choices hence the rising number of diabetics and obese people judging by how many people are overweight these days. Shockingly over 60% of the adult population of the UK were deemed over weight in the UK 5 years ago.

So you're right we need fat in our diets and we need a balanced healthy diet that works for us and obesity leading to diabetes is the price paid when we get it wrong.

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Agree but think you should point out "sugar" in stuff like spuds rice pasta bread etc - even NICE has now acknowledged this albeit only for diabetics ... excuse me but if it's bad for diabetics why isn't it bad for all of us! (Er the answer is it is!)

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Hi cheritorrox, I'm sorry but you've confused me as I'm not aware of what I've said is only bad for me. So let me clear something up, I'm not diabetic nor obese. I am a coeliac but thats not what you're talking about.

I just feel that we have to do something to help prevent obesity leading to type 2 diabetes and this is the Healthy Eating forum hence my post and interest. I also posted a link to Diabetes UK with their more comprehensive advice.

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Sorry Jerry - what I meant was that rises in insulin (from sugar in whatever form) affects all of us not just people who are already / on the way to being diabetic.

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cheritorrox,

The reason why potatoes, rice ( certain types) and some fruits are not always good for a Diabetic is because they can raise a Diabetics blood sugar too fast. This isn’t good in the long run because the Diabetic can have complications— such as Diabetic Retinopathy, kidney issues, amputations of foot/hand, etc.. i’m type 1 and have Diabetic (mild) Retinopathy.

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Exactly - but my point is that stuff which spikes insulin is not good for any of us ...

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Hi Jerry

Thanks for this information, I shall look forward to reading it, and I really like your Bluebell wood photo - beautiful. :-)

Zest :-)

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Thanks Zest, I took that photo over a week ago so they’re really blooming now. 😊

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The visceral fat and dyslipidaemia that we all need to avoid is rife in gorillas in captivity, domesticated cattle, and ducks/geese bred for foie gras, yet none of them eat saturated fat. It is excess carbohydrate that results in de novo lipogenesis (DNL).

If we focussed our healthy eating on keeping carbohydrate intake to about 60 GLs per day, the UK would not have the type 2 diabetes problem it has, and it would be far easier to control weight.

Healthy eating messages include to limit saturated fat, yet all recent national nutrition surveys assert that as a nation we only eat about 1% more than is recommended (and I'm eating someone's). Halving the former RDA for carbohydrate would far more dramatically improve the health of the nation; the ICS-NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme has three approaches that enable people to reduce their carbohydrate intake (and only one low-fat approach) because carbohydrate directly affects blood glucose and consequently has the biggest impact on insulin levels. It is these high insulin levels that lead to the DNL outlined above.

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The USA cut its fat intake from 42% to 34%, yet is one of the most obese nations in the World. We should move on from this failed experiment, instead of following international guidelines that are led by the USDA that has a mandate to promote crop sales.

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Right now I’m trying to reverse prediabetes, I am overweight and have at the moment 20 lb to lose to reach a healthy weight. I’m focusing on the weight loss at present and due for a retest in July. The calories I have cut for weight loss are mostly carb calories as it makes sense to reduce the macronutrient my body is struggling to handle. I probably wouldn’t qualify as “low carb” but it’s a lot lower than it was, whereas I left protein and fat where they were (haven’t eaten any “low fat” foods for a couple of years unless it’s something that’s naturally low fat that I really like) the carbs I’m eating now are to prioritise fibre as I’m struggling with that a little. Apples seem to keep “things moving” and I notice the difference if I don’t have an apple!

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With Diabetes, Diabetics count carbs. and this helps along with weight loss along with tighter control of the blood sugars.

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Yes I’m starting to learn about this in case I have to do it, I’m hoping that I’m one of those people who can reverse pre-diabetes simply by losing weight, cutting out added sugars and reducing starches but keeping more fibrous carbs like whole fruits and legumes. I realise even if my tests show improvement in July that I will never be able to eat like I did before but that won’t be a hardship as I’m really enjoying what I eat now and don’t miss the junk (I don’t think I ever really enjoyed it but the cravings were quite strong) I will have given it six months to see if I can improve things without having to actually count carbs which seems a reasonable time.

If it turns out my tests don’t improve despite my weight loss and much healthier eating (both of my grandfathers were type 2, both of them slim and active so genetics might play a part) then I plan on buying a glucometer (the NHS does not supply these for prediabetics in the UK) so I can see which carbs spike my blood glucose as I have learnt from type 2 diabetics that this varies between individuals.

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Hi Fran, I think that you are doing really well with your weight loss as I know that you're half way there and when our relationship with food changes we wonder why we ate certain things in the past.

Ironically many foods that are empty calories are considered treats when in reality food is our fuel and real food hits the mark nutritionally.

A healthy diet isn't an austere diet...it's the opposite as its rich in nutrients...so I wish you well with dealing with pre-diabetes. 😊

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That’s great, but you might want to get a meter to check once a week or during the day to see if you have to eat something before the 6 months. You don’t want to have hypoglycemia on the go and not know it.😀

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Sounds like you're right on track ... someone here said glucometers only cost about 20 quid so I must admit in your situation I'd be tempted to get one pre - July!

All the best :)

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< I plan on buying a glucometer (the NHS does not supply these for prediabetics in the UK) so I can see which carbs spike my blood glucose >

In Australia we get these free and I had an old original Accu-Chek Active and because the test strips are no longer made I replaced it with an Accu-Chek Guide

which when comparing tests between the two I was getting huge differences.

Accu Chek Active - 5.4

Accu Chek Guide - 6.8

As this 20% margin was erratic and totally unreliable I ended up getting a

Contour Next as the replacement.

My 90 day blood tests always were near the Accu Chek Active 90 day readings.

What I am pointing out is that any meter you buy may not be accurate and without knowing your base readings its very hard to establish that base.

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TOO LATE

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Hi, Jerry.

As you know, (Intermittent) Fasting is good for (pre)diabetes... Se this discussion on the Fasting and Furious forum:

healthunlocked.com/fasting-...

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