Cutting down or reducing dairy products in your diet

I wonder if you could help or advise me please?

Reading through various recipes of this site as well as other similar sites, meat is absent in the vast majority of cases. Do I infer that the best advice is to move to a "plant" based diet and to reduce the amount of dairy products (that includes milk, butter cheese as well as red meat)?

I would really appreciate your views.

Hugh

11 Replies

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  • No. Nutrient dense foods satisfy your appetite for longer. Plant foods necessitate a larger gut.

    Whilst we need plant foods to aid digestion, as apes do, our greater brain size was facilitated by consuming adequate protein and fats. Agricultural man's brain size shrank; not because it is more efficient, but because the agricultural diet frequently lacks sufficient nutrients. Compare our need for fat soluble vitamins to water soluble vitamins for example, yet we have been repeatedly encouraged to cut back on the foods that provide these nutrients.

  • Thank you. I really appreciate your comments.

    I have made a choice to cut back on my red meat intake but still eat cheese and drink milk and yogurts

    The reason for the inquiry is that I have heard a lot about the effects that red meat have on us and was wondering about the effect of animal products in general

  • Hi rapier20uk I found an article entitled Red and Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies, that concludes:

    "High intake of red and processed meat is associated with significant increased risk of colorectal, colon and rectal cancers. The overall evidence of prospective studies supports limiting red and processed meat consumption as one of the dietary recommendations for the prevention of colorectal cancer."

    link: plosone.org/article/info%3A...

    So, looks like you have made a wise move on cutting back on red meat!

    I couldn't find anything (on the same level of evidence) about dairy consumption. On the contrary, I see many saying there is no evidence for such claims (like this one: link.springer.com/article/1... Also, since you are (probably) cutting back your saturated fat consumption by cutting back red meat I wouldn't worry so much. I don't know about you, but I wouldn't be able to live without CHEESE! Moderation is a good general rule...

    Hope that was helpful, if you like checking out evidence for health claims you might want to check out the Healthy Evidence community: healthunlocked.com/healthye...

  • Thank you Simone. That's really helpful.

    Take care

    Hugh

  • Why would you wish to cut down on dairy fats when these fats are exactly what you should eat if you wish to avoid dementia/alzheimers etc. Ever since the world has been told to cut back on animal fats and eat more carbohydrates there has been worldwide outbreak of obesity and type 2 diabetes (precursor to dementia). Add statins to the equation..... cholesterol is exactly what you brain needs for optimal health. I suggest you read Dr.David Perlmutter's books - especially 'Grain Brain' - what you must cut down on are sugars and carbohydrates basically the cause of much inflammation/disease.

  • Hi Angel

    Have you been told to cut out dairy products or is it your own choice?

    You could try soya products, the soya milk comes sweetened with apple juice or unsweetened. Which is nice on cereals or is great as part of a smoothie.

    Soya or olive marg are a healthier choice also there is coconut milk and you can cook with the oil.

    You could also try quorn or similar products to repla e red meat, you can get anything from mince, burgers and sausages to fish or chicken fingers (made of quorn) my cat can't even tell the difference! He just sulks when i tell him after, hee hee.

    If you still want some meat try chicken, turkey or fish, turkey sausages are really nice.

    Good luck, i hope some of the ideas are helpful, take care and angel blessings xx

  • Thank you for this, it really helpful.

    Cutting down on red meats has made me feel healthier.

    I do like you say eat more vegetarian based meals.

    I do eat "white" meat and a lot more fish like tuna.

    I do not buy prepared meals like I used to and cook the vast majority of meals now.

    I still eat red meat but it is a relatively part of my diet.

    Thanks again for your advice

    Hugh

  • Hi Angel

    You're very welcome, glad to help xx

    I don't know if you'd be interested, but i've just started having smoothies for some of my meals.

    The site is green thickies, she caters for all health needs and even banana free smoothies! Take a look.

    Take care and angel blessings xx

  • As we get older I think it is wise to reduce the amount of red meat in particular, for reasons already posted and link provided below. I think its fine to have meat as long as its not excessive amounts.

    What I do is eat 3 days meat (this may include, red meat, pork, chicken or turkey) one day fish and the remaining 3 days getting protein from eggs, beans or lentils etc.

    I take very little cows milk now, I have almond milk, rice milk, oat milk, soya milk with occasional skimmed milk

    I always cook in olive oil. I have slightly salted lurpack butter or lurpack lighter spreadable. I believe butter is better for you than margarine.

    I still have cheese because it is delicious grated on tomato pasta and vegetables when not having gravy :) I think cheese is fine as long as consumption is not excessive. A cheese alternative is difficult because to make cheese you need milk. I do believe you can get Rice Cheese though, links that may interest you below:

    Rice Cheese:

    google.co.uk/search?q=rice+...

    Red Meat:

    nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pa...

    Nutritional values in foods:

    nutritionvalue.org/

    I think when it comes to eating any foods, whether its meat, fish, vegetables, fruits, eggs etc, it is always better to buy locally if you can and the foods that are less likely to be contaminated with antibiotics and pesticides, best options would be to choose organic produce.

    Soil association:

    soilassociation.org/antibio...

    The person that wrote eating organic won't make you healthier, must have had a real block in intelligence or common sense, because non organic foods are treated with pesticides and some injected with substances to prolong shelf life. We may get the same nutrition but the bonus in eating organic is you won't also be consuming any extras that may have been added as they sometimes are in non organic foods.

    Its a personal choice but mostly I opt for organic just because I don't want to add too many unknown extras into my body.

  • Thank you that's really helpful.

    I'm really grateful for the information that you sent me

    Take care

    Hugh

  • Hi Hugh,

    Sounds like you are on the right track in preparing your own meals and moving away from processed or pre-packaged foods. I have moved away from a high protein diet to a more balanced one and cut red meat by about 2/3 over time by reducing quantity and eating other proteins regularly.

    For example, if you find in reducing red meat that you lose a bit of energy, then you could try having small amounts of protein with each meal.. eg rather than a 400gm steak as the main component of dinner, 120gm beef in a Thai beef salad is a great alternative. Plus you get the balance of greens and alkaline producing lime juice and vinegar via the dressing to help digest the meat optimally. My doctor recommended a small piece of cheese or egg with my lunchtime salad, and a small amount of 80% cacao organic dark chocolate for the 3pm afternoon snack and I have discovered French green lentil and roast vege salads are yum!. I find I don't get the red meat cravings if I consume small amounts of protein through the day, even after lots of exercise.

    Good luck with everything. My personal tip is for best support of good health, eating a variety of fresh and organic is best!

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