Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is a leguminous, annual plant originating in India and North Africa. It is an herbal product with many proposed health benefits found in the diets of various Middle Eastern countries and is now cultivated worldwide. The leaves and seeds of fenugreek are formulated to an extract or powder form for therapeutic application.

Fenugreek has been studied extensively in human and animal models. The effects of fenugreek supplementation on the regulation of insulin and hyperglycemia are well established. Defatted fractions of fenugreek seeds, high in fiber content and containing steroid saponins, lowered blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations after eight days of consumption in dogs [1]. Other investigations utilizing human participants have implemented fenugreek supplementation (daily doses of 1 to 25 g/day) to diabetic patients eliciting positive glucose regulation responses [2,3]. Another study [4] examined the acute and chronic outcomes of a soluble dietary fiber (SDF) prepared from fenugreek seeds administered to type 1 and type 2 diabetic rats. After an oral glucose cocktail, SDF significantly offset blood glucose elevation in non-diabetic and diabetic (type 1 and 2) rats at 75 and 30 minutes post-consumption respectively. Following a 28 day SDF supplementation period, type 2 diabetic rats experienced a significant reduction (19%) in blood glucose levels, initiating a 1.5 fold increase in hepatic glycogen stores. Other formulations of fenugreek, such as the combination of several oils (including fenugreek oil), have shown to decrease circulating glucose and enhance insulin sensitivity in diabetic and hypertensive rats [5]. The glucose transporting mechanisms observed in these studies are mediated though an insulin-signaling pathway [6]. Fenugreek seed extract acts in a similar fashion to that of insulin by promoting glucose uptake into cells through a dose-dependent manner [6]. Additional evidence has shown that fenugreek seeds aid in the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells [7], thus allowing blood glucose levels to reduce by the transport and entrance of glucose into muscle cells.......

.......There is also evidence linking fenugreek to reduced hepatic cholesterol levels and elevated hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) activity [10], the enzyme accountable for catabolizing chylomicrons and VLDL's to smaller remnant particles [11]. Mitigation of hepatic steatosis by reducing triglyceride accumulation in the liver [12] and prevention of ethanol-induced toxicity and apoptosis in liver cells [13] are other recent discoveries attributable to fenugreek. An aqueous herbal extract containing fenugreek lowered alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glucose values, signifying a reduction in inflammation and a feasible protective agent against alloxan-induced oxidative stress and diabetes [14].

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  • However....

    theepochtimes.com/n3/191116...

    Fenugreek is generally safe, but it isn’t appropriate for everybody, as it may affect hormones in problematic ways. Those with hypothyroidism, for example, are urged to take caution with fenugreek because it is believed to interfere with thyroid hormones. Some mothers who take copious amounts of fenugreek to increase their milk supply also report a drop in thyroid function.

  • Fenugreek acts like estrogen much like soy ....so in case of estrogen dominance related problems fenugreek is not suitable

  • cure

    Very informative but would you please elaborate why fenugreek seeds should be soaked and or sprouted.

    @Cure recently i have come across an article jis mein hum jis ko " ankado " bolte hai ( arey bhaiya jis k phool hanumanji ko chadhate hai ) uske patte ko pairon k soles pe rakho for 15 minutes or on rt sole of males and lt sole females overnight ( socks chadha dene ka yaar ) to it reduces bs drastically. Jara search kar k batao na.

  • hmmmmm suramo tye na to kabhi suna hai na padha huwa nuksa hai.....chalo try karne mein kya jata hai....but koi logic nahi lagata....

    hmmmm you know wo Baba Ramdev ka Balkrishna what is talks about one creeper... elephant creeper...Argyreia nervosa ...he says if we tir pieces of flash in leaves of this creeper....wo jud jate hai.....

    Ab bhaiyya hum kya chup rahenge.... I know this creeper... leke aya....kutch nahi huwa...

    My brother in low is very close to Balkrishna....I was jokingly told him this....Ghusse mein he called blakrishna on mobile.... usne phone kat diya :))

  • @Cure

    says that ye 15 minute khade honewala nushka 15-20 days mein aur raat ko sole pe rakh k sonewala nushka 40 days mein apna asar dikhata hai. But one thing i could not understand - ye right and left wali baat. Ye baat kuchh hajam nhi hui.

  • pata nahi yar suramo ajma ke dekhte hai.... marata kya nahi karta?? :P

    but koi logic nahi nazar ata....

    I will tell u some funny nukse....on mobile....wo forum mein bolne jaise nahi mhai....

  • suramo is mein bhi 2 type hai.... one is bluish and other is white....

    bluish we call as RUI....wohi rui aap log cotton ko bolte hai.... since iske fruit se kapas/cotton nikalta hai....

    This variety is for hanumanji

    other variety is white....we call it Mandar....

    It is said that ganeshji Mandar ke roots mein rahate hai....

    In tantra shastra there are various use of root of mandar....

    but ye sugar wali cheez kutch samaz mein nahi ayi...

  • @Cure

    white. Hope you are talking about "aankada "

  • are bhai suramo agar soak nahi karenge....ya sprout nahi karenge toh khyenge kaise???

    Bahut kadva hota hai wo....

    aur sprouting ke bad u can make usal of same.... meri Ma banati thi....(now she is old abhi nahi banati) very tasty....she use to add dried prawns in same...

    waise iska laddu bhi banta hai....

    Preganacy mein milk enhancer kar ke kam ata hai....

    One more thing.....

    This acts on all glands.....cleansing karta hai.....Thyroid bhi.....so ppl having problem should be careful about the same....

  • By the way suramo I also mix them in wheat.....so I do consume them without soaking also :)

  • Ya. I know.

  • cure

    arey isko chabana thode hi hai. I used to take unsoaked - swallowed with water. Also a bowel cleanser because of its hygroscopic property. Daily chaba k khana - soaked or unsoaked is a herculean task. We add methi dana in idada and dhokala. Makes it crunchy and healthy too. I take twice daily soaked.

    Why i was asking because i think the hygroscopic action inside intestines could be more helpful. Soaked methi loses that property to great extent. But you are authority on ayu 😜😜

  • nahi baba koi authority nahi....but sun.....even in diarrhea....just swallow few grains of Methi dana whole... will give you relief

  • @suramo

    I don't understand why they say have sugar lowering effect....

    indianetzone.com/38/aditya_...

    In Ayurvedic practice, the leaves, roots, flowers and latex of this medicinal plant is indispensable. The body parts of Aditya are made into many compound preparations such as Dhanvantaram Ghritam, Kaccoradi oil, Vajrakatailam and Nagaradi tailam. The root bark of Aditya plant is highly valued and commonly used in traditional Indian medicine. It is used as a substitute for it in the treatment of a variety of ailments. In small doses it is diaphoretic and expectorant, acts as a mild stimulant, and prescribed with carminatives to treat dyspepsia.

    The powdered root bark of Aditya plant is used to ease diarrhoea and dysentery, syphilis, coughs, asthma and fevers. A paste prepared from the Aditya plant's root bark and is used externally for the relief in elephantiasis and hydrocele. Among the Kondhs of southwestern Orissa, a paste of the Aditya plant's roots is applied as a poultice to relieve rheumatic pain. In the Homeopathic system of medicine, Aditya plant is reported to be useful in the treatment of elephantiasis, lupus and chronic rheumatism.

    The Bhils of Maharashtra widely use the root extract of this medicinal plant in the form of a pill to kill guinea worms and they also use the latex from the plant as a local application to treat ringworm and other skin diseases. The Paharia and Santhalis of Bihar take a mixture of the Aditya plant's stem bark and black pepper internally for the treatment of epilepsy. The flowers of the Aditya plant possess digestive and tonic properties, and are used in the form of powder for healing cough, catarrh and asthma. The dried powdered flowers of the Aditya plant are recommended in small doses with honey to treat mental disorders by the tribal inhabitants of Maharashtra.

    Among the Baigas of northeastern Madhya Pradesh, the ashes of the Aditya plant's burned flowers are mixed with honey and given orally to treat whooping cough and asthma; they also apply the paste of the flowers to stiff joints in order to relieve pain. The roasted leaves of the Aditya plant are also at times applied to relieve painful joints or swellings.

    The dried, powdered leaf is sometimes boiled in sweet oil for external use to heal eczema, infectious skin eruptions, ulcers, toothache and wounds. The paste of Aditya plant's leaves is used for relieving intermittent fevers. The leaves and stalk of this Indian plant include calotropin, which is apparently effective in fertility control. However, large doses of this plant's extracts can cause nausea, headache, vomiting and diarrhoea.

  • suramo

    Look this url....its about Akado

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

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