Dogs

Hi there, was out for my long run yesterday. I run in a rural area which is beautiful. The next thing a huge (I mean huge) collie comes charging out a garden all teeth and ruff standing on end. Ferocious barking from dog and high pitched shrieking from me (its ok I'm a girl) and it then went back in. I was on the other side of the road of the property and hadn't gone near the boundary so was pretty shocked when it came at me. I come from a farming family and my dear Dad had three collies that did not carry on like that except when commanded to. Any tips for handling this better?This route is lovely and I would love to run it regularly but I really don't want to get a fright like that again. I know there's bound to be a few dog experts out there who can advise me. Happy new year guys!!

21 Replies

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  • Wow that's nasty I would see if you can have a word with the owner but maybe it's been trained to defend the property/ If shrieking worked maybe just do that again ;-)

    Happy New Year

  • This may be beyond your control. In my opinion, it's never the dogs that's cause the problems, it's the owners. The dog is reacting this way because it has always been encouraged (or not discouraged, same thing) to do so. A well trained, well disciplined dog is a happy dog, is a pleasure to meet and will be a great friend for life. Sorry to say you might just have to avoid it.

  • I totally agree! Whilst I don't have my own dog due to work commitments I love them. I don't blame the dog at all its how it has been trained. I don't think the situation is going to change so I think the sensible thing is to give this route a miss which is a shame.Thanks

  • It frightened the life out of me. Having been around collies most of my life though this one will definitely bite someone. I don't want to ruin my run worrying about what is going to happen. Luckily I have plenty of other routes. Thanks

  • Thing is I'd have to get past the dog to get to the front door!

  • Just ignore the dog and make no eye contact - as if it makes not a jot of difference to your personal atmosphere and is just a tedious noise outside of your consciousness (try yawning or sighing which can let the dog know you are not a threat and breaks your own tension). Hard not to look at something which is making a terrible din because you want to assess how serious it is, but try not to 'give it oxygen' by reacting. Did it come through the fence at you? If so, definitely have a word with the owner because that is quite different to barking from within its boundary.

    Happy Running New Year and hope you can enjoy your lovely new route.

  • Take a picture on your smart phone and report it to the local police....the dog shouldn't be able to escape the property.

  • PS I take my dog running with me and I like dogs but this just isn't safe.

  • Was considering calling the dog warden about this as I'm sure local kids are terrorised by this dog.I'll give it more thought. Thanks

  • This is my nightmare scenario. I have a phobia about dogs , so I'm interested in any advice offered. I am very worried about doing the parkrun that I want to do to 'graduate', so far I've been glued to the treadmill.

    No eye contact and ignoring the dog is the best advice I've had so far, and It works if you can do it. Telling the dog "NO" tends not to work, but it's something to shout to get the owners attention. Running away is not a good thing to do (I don't think that carrying on jogging past is the same thing - maybe), as the dog will either chase you down to kill you or chase you down to play with you. Both options look the same from my point of view.

    If it were me I would never go anywhere near the place again, but that shouldn't be necessary. Talking to the owner sounds like it's the right thing to do, but in my experience owners don't react well to criticism of their perfectly safe, calm and collected dog (that is outside with it's paws on the window sill barking and bearing it's teeth).

  • You'll love parkrun.c25k prepares you well for it. Thanks to all the good advice I think I'll give this route a miss. Thanks

  • Oh dear, what a shame! I think you've had all the best replies about how to deal with it but it seems a pity that you have to choose a different route to run. Glad to hear you have other good routes so happy running and Happy New Year too x

  • Yes I'm a bit sad about missing out on this route as it goes alongside a river just beautiful but safety first!!! Great to hear from you as I enjoy your posts. happy new year to you and yours!!!

    Urs

  • I was reading the other day that someone has gone to prison for allowing their dog to be out of control. It bit several people using a trail over a period of a few months. The dog is being re-homed. It was a relatively unusual pedigree breed and nothing 'notorious'

  • I love dogs and when well trained and loved are a joy to be with. Its such a shame as aggression like that will only end in disaster. Hopefully the owner will see sense soon. Happy new year!

  • It is indeed a particular time of year so perhaps this isn't such a regular occurrence - the dog more stressed due to comings and goings, had 'escaped' etc. It does seem odd that the owner wouldn't investigate that amount of noise.

    Any dog can behave unpredictably. Mine once jumped up at a runner whilst I was out for a walk - I had intended to put her on the lead but this runner was moving a lot faster than I realised and I wasn't quite quick enough. Totally unexpected for her to jump up at a stranger. No physical harm done to person or property but must have been scary for the runner (and mortifying for me) My dog has Silver Award KC Canine Good Citizen but....

    Round me the hazard is more bovine than canine - Highland cattle have started using the wood we often run in.

  • Wow gorgeous but daunting I imagine. I know my Dad's bulls and bullocks could be really terrifying particularly in the springtime. It sounds gorgeous though running through woodland. In the Spring I was thinking of finding/ setting up a running group to run woodland in our area.

    I don't mind dogs barking in their own territory or even jumping up or wanting to play its the crazy hackles up snarling that scares me. Anyway a solution will come!

  • Wow gorgeous but daunting I imagine. I know my Dad's bulls and bullocks could be really terrifying particularly in the springtime. It sounds gorgeous though running through woodland. In the Spring I was thinking of finding/ setting up a running group to run woodland in our area.

    I don't mind dogs barking in their own territory or even jumping up or wanting to play its the crazy hackles up snarling that scares me. Anyway a solution will come!

  • Any reaction will encourage the dog more. Squealing or any other noise and flapping arms and it becomes a game. I'm a dog walker and walk 18 dogs plus my two Labradors. Luckily my gang are well trained happy dogs and I only have one who sometimes barks. She just gets straight back on lead which soon shuts her up. I have bad problems on walks with JackRussells and Collies (having owned a collie I know they can be very highly strung)

    There have very recently been some very stringent laws brought in regarding barking dogs and their owners. May be worth asking your local dog warden to speak to the owner. And yes,as has been said, it's always the owner sadly. The poor dog suffers because รญt has a bad owner who takes no responsibility.

    Hoe things work out for you and your running route :)

  • Very useful, thanks for finding it for me. Like the collie I'm a bit highly strung hence the shrieking. Probably best if we go our separate ways. Been out and done the hill runs today so it hasn't put me off. Happy new year!

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