Smoking or eating marijuana is not a cure for cancer

Smoking or eating marijuana is not a cure for cancer

"There’s a modern myth that marijuana (cannabis sativa), in its natural form, is effective at both preventing and treating cancer. This myth has become ever more popular with the gradual approval of marijuana for recreational use in many places, most notably in some American states.

This misplaced belief most likely stems from the numerous studies that have shown that select chemicals found in marijuana have some anticancer properties. But it misses many important aspects of pharmacy that go beyond just the chemicals in the plant."


'In bench top, petri dish-like experiments, these chemicals have been shown to kill or slow the growth of different cancers, including in one study, colorectal tumours and leukaemia. Some studies have also shown effectiveness in animals models, but all these used the pure chemicals as injectable solutions.

Unfortunately, anticancer activity in the laboratory doesn’t always equal similar activity in humans. More than 80% of drugs fail human cancer clinical trials even though they have been found to be curative in animals."

Nial Wheate, Senior Lecturer in Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains why such promising results do not translate to beneficial results when the natural form is smoked or ingested. This article is relevant to herbal remedies in general:


While my state is more lenient than other Australian states when it comes to personal marijuana use, the authorities do come down heavily on those caught growing commercial quantities. Despite this, It isn't unknown for large crops to be found growing with automated irrigation and hidden in natural scrub, carefully disguised from aerial detection...

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  • Michael Vagg, Clinical Senior Lecturer at Deakin University School of Medicine & Pain Specialist at Barwon Health asks, Is the medical marijuana debate even worth having?

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