Fenbendazole: Has anyone tried... - Advanced Prostate...

Advanced Prostate Cancer
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Fenbendazole

Has anyone tried fenbendazole? I have been reading a lot about this “dewormer for dogs” that supposedly can inhibit cancer cells.

I’ve come across a lot of interesting information on this and I also personally know someone that claims they cured their small cell terminal lung cancer with this.

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Dear Hopeseeker,

I'd be very leery of trying drugs that have not been rigorously tested in humans for the specific disease in question. I suppose that if everything else has failed and imminent death is certain, it might be worth a shot. But even then it's always possible that an untested drug could cut the remaining time and make it more miserable. It would be a crap shoot with the odds against you.

I did a quick search and found an article about a drug very like fenbendazole tested for brain cancer at Johns Hopkins. See: americaninno.com/dc/johns-h...

Hopkins thought it might have promise but I noticed this in the article:

"Riggins says he can’t confirm that the drug works just yet, but he has high hopes for the future. So far patients have experienced few side effects, but the low doses given to people in the trial also haven’t forestalled tumors from forming."

As I understand it, most drugs that have had some beneficial effect against cancer in the test tube or in animals turn out not to be effective in humans. And a lot of those that do have very limited effectiveness and only for some patients.

As for curing small cell lung cancer, I'd need a LOT more evidence for that than a patient report. I once read a posting from a man who had created a whole website to tell the world that he cured his prostate cancer with a macrobiotic diet. When I questioned him about what other treatments he had he admitted that he also had radiation and ADT, but he didn't think that the radiation was actually aimed at his prostate. I asked if he had to take his pants down to get the radiation. I guess he did because very shortly after that he took down the website.

Patients don't always have a very scientific understanding of what happened to them.

Best of luck.

Alan

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Hi Alan, please see my post below. Riggins is "the guy" in the NPR/Hopkins story and the current study at Hopkins is addressing precisely the dosage issue you mentioned. Good stuff.

Lightmun

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Interesting stuff. I tend to be very skeptical until I've seen results from a clinical trial but it does at least look like there's some hope here.

Thanks.

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Don’t know about Fenben, but take a look at Niclosamide, a tapeworm medication receiving some buzz as an off label cancer drug. You might want to read “how to starve cancer” by Jane McClelland. It is compelling stuff, and I say this as a beneficiary of all the conventional treatments.

I don’t believe much of what the “integrative/wholistic” believers subscribe to, but to totally deny that cancer has a metabolic component which can be addressed through metabolic approaches, including nutrition, supplementation and off label use of drugs like Metformin is just naive and dangerous. McClelland’s writing is pretty technical, but the science seems solid.

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I should add that Niclosamide has poor oral bioavailability. A phase 1 trial investigating whether larger doses might help with castration resistance was terminated due to toxicity associated with those higher doses.

A cynic might argue that this trial was designed to fail, because Niclosamide is an old, cheap drug, and big Pharmaceutical will not profit. Draw your own conclusions.

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I wouldn't be one of the cynics on this one. The article is published free in PLOS ONE and full text can be seen here: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

It looks like the raw data from the trial is included in the article so anyone can look at it. The funding statement is as follows:

"We acknowledge research support from National Cancer Institute grants P30 CA015704, P30 CA033572 and R50 CA221836; Pacific Northwest Prostate Cancer SPORE CA097186, The Prostate Cancer Foundation (including Young Investigator Awards to MTS and HHC); and Department of Defense Award W81XWH-16-1-0484."

I wouldn't expect that any of those organizations have skin in the game.

Based on the article, I wouldn't take Niclosamide for prostate cancer.

Alan

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Hi Hopeseeker,

You are indeed onto something very significant. The class of anti-parasitic drugs that includes both fenbendazole and mebendazole have attracted a lot of attention and research efforts since at least 2002, with an uptick lately due to at least two lab events, one at John Hopkins and another at Merck.

At Hopkins, some mice who had been embedded with cancer became infected with tapeworms and thus had to be treated with fenbendazole. Within a few days, the cancer tumors had disappeared, a "happy accident" to say the least.

At Merck, in an unrelated event, it was a little more intentional: researchers had simply been experimenting with various medicines in their repertoire and had found that fenbendazole had "batted 1,000" in eradicating cancerous tumors in mice.

The Merck experiment has led to a rapidly growing word-of-mouth reporting of self-medicated success stories with fenbendazole. At Hopkins, meanwhile, there is a 6-year study in progress to determine the maximum safe dosage for humans using mebendazole, an indication that the company is taking the potential for cancer treatment by this class of drugs quite seriously.

There have also been promising studies in America, the UK and, most recently, India using either fenbendazole or mebendazole.

I'm new to this blog so I'm not sure how much information to post at a given time so I'll stop for now, pending any further interest.

In the meantime, the links below are for:

1) an NPR article on the Hopkins happy accident event;

2) the 2018 study at Punjab University in India;

3) the blog site for a pioneer of the self-medicators inspired by the Merck study.

I hope this helps and would be glad to answer any further questions or concerns. I've been on this story for about 8 months and continue to be profoundly encouraged. In short, the science is solid and the hope is real.

npr.org/sections/health-sho...

nature.com/articles/s41598-...

mycancerstory.rocks/

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I’m aware of these studies and I am really wanting my dad to take fenbendazole. I know of 2 people now personally that have been able to put terminal cancer into remission. One had a brain tumor, the other lung cancer. Both extremely advanced with just months to live and both now in remission. I wouldn’t believe this, but I’ve seen it firsthand.

Joe Tippens is an Oklahoman. That’s where I live. He is helping a lot of people around here with his story.

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Unlike most experimental treatments, this one seems to be an already approved drug that has been used for years - though I do see that there are potentially serious side effects. There is info about side effects in the FDA drug label.

Here's an FDA label for mebendezol: accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatf...

When I searched for fenbendazole on the FDA website all I found were documents pertaining to animals.

Here's a starting point for FDA searches: fda.gov/

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Okay, Hopeseeker, Joe is where my interest began. After learning of my brother-in-law's advanced myeloma, Joe sent him an email detailing his story. Ever the skeptic, but intrigued, I emailed an old friend of my mine from the University of Pennsylvania football team who went on to become the head of the cell biology department at Rutgers University.

Thinking that a bit of well-explained science might help your dad be more open to a seemingly unorthodox approach, and that it might help you and others understand some of the cell mechanics, here's how that went:

After I had laid out Joe's tale in some detail, my friend initially warned me that things that seemed too good to be true often were. The next day, however, he emailed me again to say he was finding various trials that indicated there was serious scientific interest in the approach. He also began theorizing how it might work, based on his own life’s work that just happened to center around what turns out to be precisely the cellular mechanics that would be involved in explaining how a drug that basically attacks parasites could also attack cancer cells.

Eventually, he summarized as follows.

" a. Background I: The protein tubular assembles into the microtubule polymers that make the mitotic spindle during mitosis, in other words cell division. Cancer cells love to divide uncontrollably and so if you inhibit spindle formation, you inhibit division, and you inhibit cancer cells. This explains the use of vinblastin in chemotherapy cocktails. It also explains why there are so many side effects -- basically bumping off rapidly dividing cells.

b. Background II: Radiation treatment in cancer looks to damage DNA and cells that are rapidly dividing make them susceptible to radiation treatment. Radiation damages the DNA and that induces the cells to basically commit suicide (apoptosis) rather than continue dividing. The damage occurs through a molecular oxygen effect -- and thus poorly oxygenated tissue are more resistant to radiation. Tumors can have poorly oxygenated regions because they don't necessarily have organized blood vessels (vascularization). So if you can introduce chemicals that "add" oxygen to poorly oxygenated tissues the cells become more radiation sensitive.

c. The Skinny: The family of drugs in question have both of the above biological and chemical properties. Fenbendazole binds to tubulin -- although it binds tighter and better to parasite tubulin than mammalian tubulin. Thus, parasites have a tougher time surviving as their microtubules are prevented from assembling. Chemically, there is biochemical evidence that the drugs bind to DNA and that might make DNA more susceptible to breakage by radiation. So given these properties, you could build a hypothesis that the drugs might be useful as part of a chemo/radiation one-two punch.

Basically, it looks to have a role in regulating the process of transcription (Remember, Central Dogma of DNA leads to RNA leads to protein) leading to synthesis of messengerRNA (mRNA), which holds the sequence information to make protein. One protein in particular looks to play a role in the cell suicide (apoptosis) and so the drug may collude with things inside a cancer cell to promote death."

End of my friend's first batch of emails. Since then, he has become so intrigued that he has designed and run a couple small experiments at Rutgers last summer and has plans for larger format studies. When the Punjab University study showed up in Scientific American, it basically explores and confirms much of my friend's off-the-cuff theorizing. As he wrote later (after I sent him the study): "We have known about the "Punjab study" since August when the paper was published. The funny thing is they effectively did everything that was on our potential list of experiments. So effectively we now have a model paper to consider in our experiments."

So, again, serious science. Human trials, of course, will take years but because both fendbendazole and mebendazole are widely regarded for their extremely low toxicity, it appears that the risk/reward spectrum may favor giving it a try -- particularly when traditional medical options have run their course and, previous to that, perhaps as a concurrent approach.

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This site is an amazing resource to learn from. Thank you for the information. It's good to hear from people who know people who are credible.

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Really helpful and insightful thank you so much for sharing. I'm going to try this on my husband - his psa is at 1.5 following RP/RT/ADT

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Please keep us updated on your husband's progress if he does try fenbendazole. My husband just started SR and ADT this week. He was T3 Gleason 7 after RP. Doubling time now of 9 months. We are hoping for the best but preparing for the future!

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What dose did they take?

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Came across this blog post today: cancertreatmentsresearch.co... The author has specific discussion of potential dosage.

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Hi Hopeseeker,

6 months passed, did your father tried the fenbendazole? recently, a report from DailMail mentioned the "dewormer for dogs' is warmly talked in China, and we, family members of cancer patients, really want to know it really can cures the authenticity of cancer?

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Hi Valerie-wei,

No he has not tried it. He is currently in the Vision trial doing lu-177.

Google Joe Tippens KOCO 5-fenbendazole and you will see a story on this that was just aired here in Oklahoma.

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Well it is only a hundred bucks to get started, we going to try it.

The concept of starving the anaerobic reception along with choking off miocondrial tubriculs, uping the p58 natural cell life killer. Everything you need to kill a worm just happens to be how you kill a cancer to. Wish us luck !

We'll be mixing it with 6 Doxil Chemo Treatments.

CBD, Vit E, and THC

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Please keep me updated if you don’t mind! Best of luck to you I hope it works. I personally know of three different people that had end-stage cancer and they claim this is what put them in remission.

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Hi Jeff, may I know what CBD you are taking? I'm trying to search CBD OIL in amazon but only get HEMP OIL and google told me that they are not the same.

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CBD can be obtained from many of plants of the Cannabis genus: hemp or,

for lack of better term, pot. Pot being the common recreational version.

Look for a reputable seller that will provide a certificate of analysis (CoA) of the base oil/extract. This should be only for the CBD oil/extract not the one that includes any filler oils such as MCT or hemp oil, which are used to dilute the CBD oil to allow accurate dosing. The CoA for your base CBD oil should also include a pesticide analysis.

This last point is very important due to the way the biomass (raw green) input has been grown. A lot of disreputable growers will add a multitude of pesticides, herbicides and fungicides to get better yield and outward appearance. Once the biomass is subjected to the extraction process all the compounds are concentrated and become part of the oil output.

If you find an oil that you feel comfortable with I would suggest getting it tested yourself to verify what you have purchased, approx. $150. Many jurisdictions in Canada and US have third party testing labs where you can take your samples. I have done this for the CBD oil concentrate that I diluted with MCT that my wife is using.

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fenbendazole has been around for decades and they have given much larger doses than Joe tippens took to humans in study for any adverse effect. what is a tip off that it is actually a strong anti-cancer agent for the tubule destabilization is that the "cousin" (menbendazole) was bought by another company not that long ago and the price for a 100mg pill went up from under 5 dollars to 389!!! hello.... fenbendazole is off patent so anybody can make it but I am not sure about the menbendazole patent info. I read that one study with prostate cancer found that it worked best when taken with Vitamin E succinate (they mentioned it must of had a synergy together for greater cell death than just fenbendazole alone). I would stock up on this stuff because it is surely going to be in high demand and price will climb. wonder how long it will take for the gov. to try to stop over the counter sales?? hehe

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Do you know the dose to take by any chance john

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the pediatric study at John Hopkins with mebendazole (same family of anti-parasitic micro tubelle destabilizing) is giving 500mg tablets 3 times a day. (if the person were 150lbs (the age group was 1 to 21 years of age) that is about 22mg per kg of body weight a day. there was also some testing with fenbendazole on cancer (forgot specific cancer type) which said the most effective dosage in their study with just 3 dosage levels was the one that was 25mg per kg of body weight...Joe Tippens had the amazing result from aproximately 3mg per kg of body weight!!! (only 3 consecutive days each week). the mebendazole pediatric study on dosage (using the 1500mg per day dosage) mentions that potential side effects are: "although side effects are rare and the vast majority are reversible, they include stomach upset, decreased blood count, and elevated liver enzymes due to inflammation."....just FYI to consider. we started on the joe tippens dosage schedule and are increasing now monthly after seeing results of blood work.

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Hi Hopeseeker, I'm a daughter of a stage-IV Small cell lung cancer pain patient, my father is found to have the cancer in Jan 2019 and I just read Joe's story and kindly of obsessed by it. I'm now trying to purchase everything but not easy out side USA, it takes quite a lot time and I have to use alternatives.

May I know if you have ever tried it?

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Hi Jo

I am on the same boat as you

My father had been diagnosed with SCLC in January with metastatis to nearby lymphnodes

We have started with chemo n immunotherapy

But I am looking for some alternative.

Could you please update what treatment are you following?

Have you started with Fenbendazole?

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I am just starting the Fenbendazole treatment. I have metastatic breast cancer in the liver which is usually terminal so it is worth giving this new thing a go. Will let you know how I get on. Next M R I due end of June so it will be interesting to see if any effect at that point. I will continue until end September, when my next Pet/Ct scan due.

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I also have MBC to the liver and am wondering about this treatment to use in conjunction with my conventional treatment. Do you mind sharing what dose you are using, and if you care combining it with any vitamins, or other supplements?

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I am interested in following your journey. My husband has just started Fenbendazole as well. He has already done one 4 day session with a week off. We had an anomaly in yesterday's blood report, his Alkaphase dropped significantly, back down from 190 to 117 in that two week period with intake of FB although PSA is still rising. He started taking Fenben again today with CBD oil. We have not included Vit E because many trials are showing Vit E is not good for prostate cancer. Are you including Vit E... I mean doing the complete protocol as recommended on Joe's website?

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100 mg tocotrienols would be more effective with fbz.

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I think you are right ITCandy. I've been doing research tonight and am now thinking we are making an error. I found this

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Supplemented vitamins included B, D, K, E, and A. Vitamins E and A both have antitumor properties by virtue of their antioxidant properties. Vitamin E causes antitumor and antimetastatic effects in several animal models of cancer; for example, it suppresses the nuclear transcription factor NFκB in prostate cell lines.

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Hi opbuff2002,

May I ask how your MRI went? I have metastatic BC with extensive bone mets, spots on liver and a hazy mesentery. I have ordered some Fenbendazole today and will be starting the protocol soon. My next scan is next March so I have plenty of time to see if it has any effect (currently on Letrozole & Ibrance).

Any thoughts you have would be greatly appreciated.

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Hi hopeseeker

I am new to this forum so doesn't know current health of your dad

How is he doing now?

Did he started Fenbendazole?

My father had been diagnosed with extensive sclc, so we are looking for some alternative treatments

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My Dad started on Fenbendazole 4 weeks ago, per the protocol listed by Joe Tippens blog. We go to Oncologist on Wednesday next week for blood work and PSA. He previously tried Xtandi, which was a horrible drug that nearly killed him. Prior to that he was on Lupron. He stopped traditional treatments on Dec 7, 2018. His PSA has been climbing since then. Since he has been on the Fenbendazole, the swelling in his legs is gone and they are back to normal. HIs energy has increased and he feels much better. I will post more information next week when I have more evidence that Fenbendazole is working. He also takes Vit E as the research shows that Vit E and Fenbendazole worked better on prostate cancer.

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Thanks for replying

Keep us updated about the progress

Hoping that it will work for your dad

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gettinginfo, any updates?

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I currently take it for advanced colon cancer. I started a blog that tracks my experience and links to articles about fenbendazole and cancer. You can read about my experience here: fenbendazole.home.blog

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