PCOS UK (Verity)
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Positive PCOS Stories

Hello ladies, well today has been a big day for me, as my suspicions were finally confirmed, and I've been diagnosed with PCOS at 31 years old.

I understand there is no cure, and perhaps I wouldn't mind this diagnosis, if my husband and I hadn't been hoping for a baby for some time now. We've now been referred to a gynaecologist, and I'm not quite sure what comes next, how long the wait could be, or how hopeful we can realistically be.

I guess what I'm hoping by my posting this, is to hear from other ladies who have undergone this next phase, and can fill me in on what to expect, and any positive stories on being able to have their longed for families.

Thank you very much in advance, I've just always pictured myself with children, and it's difficult not to feel like that dream is a million miles away now x x x

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Assuming you live in the UK? It took about 8 weeks between diagnosis and the first fertility appointment, though it depends where you live (postcode lottery and all that). The nurse practitioner was really helpful and reassured me that pcos does not mean you can't have children. The only good thing with pcos is our egg reserves are high, so there's plenty of time. But you might need medication to help you ovulate - metformin and clomid first, and IVF if this doesn't work.

I have a second appointment in December and am waiting for an HSG (hysterosalpingogram) to check my fallopian tubes are ok. While you wait get your husband to ask for a sperm analysis. Eat a pcos friendly diet and stay active, most of all don't worry!

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Thank you very much Rach for your reply, yes I do live in the UK, South Wales. I hadn't heard about having high egg reserves before, so that is a positive in our positions!

Very good idea about getting hubby checked out in the meantime too, currently making arrangements for this.

Do you have any children as yet? Or are you trying for your first?

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Hi, I’m 31 as well and found out I had pcos through trying for a baby. I came off the pill and barely had periods. I saw a gyno in August who diagnosed me and because we had been trying for a year I got referred to fertility. My partner had a semen analysis which came out good. I had my appointment in september and been given metformin and start clomid in January (assuming I don’t get pregnant before then). So in my experience once it’s been a year they start to help you with meds. But I’m ideal bmi and healthy, not sure it’s always the same. No consultant has raised any concerns I can’t have children, obviously they can never guarantee it but women with pcos tend to go on and have children just with a little help x

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Thank you very much Ruby for that, I really hope your treatment works very soon for you!

My BMI isn't awful . . .but could certainly be better. I'm currently working on losing weight as weight loss seems to be the key here x

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I think as long as they see you are trying to loose weight they are fine about it but my friend is in a similar situation to me and was told she had to loose some weight and come back in 3 months because sometimes weight loss makes pcos better x

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Hi. I was diagnosed with PCOS 26 years ago. It was recommended that I take a contraceptive pill as I would get a period mabybe three times a years and at the time the belief was that the pill could heal the PCOS as it teaches the body to ovulate. Over the next decade or so, I took various contraceptive pills to regulate my periods until I was 33. It was at this time that the doctor said it is too dangerous being on the pill at your age as the risk of breast cancer increases the longer you stay on artificial hormones. I went off the pill that year and went onto a copper IUD as its hormone free and my body started ovulating immediately ( i.e. Getting a regular, almost-like-clock-work period for the first time in my life). Upon returning to the doctor that same year to see if I still had PCOS ( as I was suddenly getting a regular period), she ran some blood tests and found I no longer had PCOS. My body had repaired itself. It seems the doctors who initially put me on the pill might the been right. I've never had a fertility check though as I never wanted to have kids so I don't know how fertile I am. However, there is hope. Some people say to eat foods that are high in oestrogen too as they might push the body into a natural menstral cycle which could increase fertility. It's worth a try. Good luck! :)

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That's fantastic to hear about your positive results, I was under the impression that once you had PCOS, there was no cure. I've never heard of a copper IUD before? Do you mean it helped to regulate your cycle? I've just recently had a cycle which went on for 80 days x

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Wow! 80 days! That's horrible. I hope you find a solution. What I meant by the copper IUD was that once I stopped taking the pill which produced a fake period, my hormones were left up to themselves to operate normally. I started getting a period without the intervention of the hormones in the pill meaning my body had corrected itself and was now able to ovulate without assistance. It was a great feeling.

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Hi there - it's good you have a diagnosis now, so that you can get the eighth treatment. I'm 33, and ever since I was 11, had very irregular periods - to the extent where I'd have one period every 2 or 3 years. I became overweight but in 2013 lost weight through diet and exercise and miraculously and unexpect sly became pregnant in 2014. Dady our daughter was stillborn due to another condition.

However, this year, after seeing a consultant obstetrician, I started taking metformin 3x500mg in April to help aid ovulation and in June I found out I am pregnant again. I had two periods within this time 30 days apart. I'm now 18 weeks pregnant. Clomid wasn't recommended nor was it needed in my circumstances.

I've also seen a private fertility specialist, to decipher whether ivf is an option for me. It was in fact that same day that I found out I was pregnant naturally. My egg stores are very good, and ivf is not recommended for me as I've conceived naturally twice. In my case, the doctors have described the PCOS as absolutely classic - my ovaries are covered in cysts, I have hirtuism on my chin, stomach and backside, the history of very irregular periods and being overweight etc. It's also important to note I am NOT diabetic and am NOT insulin resistant. I know some people on here will say therefore metformin is not appropriate but I would suggest you take medical advice from your practitioner only - they will know what's best in your particular circumstances. It has worked very well and very quickly for me.

Wishing you all the best - let us know how you get on!

Lucy

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Thank you very for sharing your story Lucy, I can't imagine what that must have been like, to have lost your first baby after all of this, very sorry to hear. What lovely news that you're expecting though!

I know I'm not diabetic as I was tested for that, but unsure about being insulin resistant. But yes you're right, hopefully the practitioners will know the best thing for me x

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It is extremely rare not to conceive just due to pcos, it just can sometimes take a bit more time. Often the thing that can cause delays is if you are overweight as the NHS will not treat you if your BMI is above 30. Has your husband been checked yet, as 1/3 of fertility issues are now men which can make it a bit trickier!

The one advantage of pcos is our egg quality remains better for longer so you have about 10 years before you need to listen for the ticking clock so dont worry about that. I conceived Noah when I was 36 via IUI (my hubbie had dead and two tailed sperm which didnt help, even tho his diet was good and didnt drink or smoke). Noah is now 11 and well worth the struggle :-)

From my point of view you should have your tubes checked first and your partners wrigglers, they can also zap your cysts too if you have any (not all pcos ladies do), then clomid.

What are your periods like - are you checking to see if you ovulate as a period doesnt mean you are ovulating and you can ovulate without one too - nice and straight forward lol!

You will get their in the end so try not to worry too much.

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Great information thank you! That's fantastic news about your Noah :) I can imagine it makes all of this completely worth it!

The ultrasound I had showed up one enlarged ovary with a possible involuting follicular cyst, and multiple cysts on both ovaries. I haven't had my tubes checked as yet - I did mention that to my GP, they seem to think the gynaecologist will investigate if need be? We're also making arrangements for my hubby to be checked too.

My BMI is currently 30.6 . . .I'm actively working on lowering that, so hoping weight won't be too much of an issue.

I would say I perhaps have 5-6 periods or less a year, and some of the cycles can be 70 plus days. When I came off the pill, for the first 5 months everything seemed to be working well, 30-35 day cycles and positive ovulation tests. However I've learnt since, that ovulation tests can detect the surge, but still no guarantee ovulation is happening?? So when my cycles became longer and longer, I gave up tracking ovulation because I had no idea when it would be, or whether the test even if positive,was accurate x

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Hi Babsy_bee, my husband and I have been trying for 3 and half Years. We saw the doctor after 1 year of trying, I had all the tests and then a year later I was diagnosed with PCOS! We then tried 9 months of clomid but I didn’t respond very well. I was checked only on my first cycle of clomid which I think isn’t right! I then got referred for IUI. We had one round which unfortunately failed, however I responded really well to the injections and over produced eggs. Instead of going for a further 2 rounds of IUI I am going for our first round of IVF in a few weeks. It does feel like things take forever, but waiting times in between appointments was nothing really. And you already know what the issue is so hopefully you won’t wait too long. Our doctor gave us 6 months of clomid and when that failed they referred us to Neath WFI which took about 2-3 months (I was given clomid for these extra months to tide me over). The WFI Clinic is fantastic!! Hope this helps x

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Hi I have also read in lots of places that having pcos doesn't mean you can't conceive you might just need some help. Its great to read positive stories on here. We ve been trying for about 20 months and now I ve been told I have slightly polycystic ovaries, whatever that means! But I am ovulating. But I'm about to turn 40 so time is not on my side, but trying to stay hopeful. I ve given up sugar and basically gone on to a paleo diet, so no grains. A lot of women with pcos are insulin resistant so regulating blood sugar is important. I read a great book called the period repair manual which had some really useful suggestions. Anyway sending you lots of luck. Hope you get the result you want soon.

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