Healing Auto Immune Disease by Someone Who's Been There

Angela is a naturopath and homoeopath in Sydney specialising in restorative endocrinology, women’s health and infertility. She works from her clinic Tonic, in Woollahra and sends out a rippa newsletter.

She teaches, lectures and writes for publications around the world and is currently a faculty member at the Texas Chiropractic College and the University of Miami School of Medicine, Integrative Medicine Department in the United States. She is appointed to...

sarahwilson.com.au/2010/02/...

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  • In the article linked to it states:

    "Mineral oils: as used in most commercial salad dressings, & margarine (pure man-made ‘plastic’; there is nothing in the manufacture of margarine that EVER grew or was alive!!!! It’s a horror story for our cells)."

    Which I find perplexing.

    I know of no commercial salad dressings that contain mineral oils. I seem to remember that liquid paraffin was used for dried fruit many years ago - but that has stopped long since. And the ingredients of all the 'spreads' I have read do indeed include many ordinary grown food oils - olive, rapeseed, or whatever.

    To the best of my knowledge, there is no margarine available for retail purchase in the UK.

    Sure I don't know everything - but does anyone know of a salad dressing with mineral oil content? Or any available margarine?

    Rod

  • All supermarkets sell margarine. Stork is a margarine and been sold since time began almost.Not sure about the salad dressing as I make my own.

    Dancer.

  • If you look here:

    unilever.co.uk/brands/foodb...

    you can see that the references to the product nowadays are all to 'Stork spread'. There is a legal definition of margarine and the spread products renamed themselves to avoid having to conform to that definition.

    If you want to know more, have a look at this link:

    imace.org/legislation/eu-le...

    I am pretty sure that in retail, none of the products available in the UK have sufficient fat content to be called margarine. (Though some of the blended spreads might have sufficient fat but fail on some other count to qualify.)

    That link also lists the permitted ingredients in margarines and spreads. Don't think you'll see much mineral oil which was my main original point.

    Rod

  • Sorry never eaten the stuff so not read the label, Ive just seen it on the shelf for years and assumed it was still called margarine. Thanks for taking the time to search out all this info on it.

    Dancer.

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