Thyroid UK
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I'm 24 years old and female. I feel so muddled about what to do at the moment. I have so many symptoms and undergone so many tests. My TSH has jumped from 5.6 (0.2 - 4.2) to 2.2 (0.2 - 4.2) within 2 months, then 0.02 (0.2 - 4.2) to 5.44 (0.2 - 4.2) within 4 weeks! Vitamins and minerals I have been told are fine, have had high cortisol then low cortisol, also low DHEA. Presented pages upon pages of blood results to a naturopath who could give no reason as to why I am suffering, no name to any illness. Also TPO antibody 1300 (<34) and TG antibody 276.3 (<115) Advice appreciated!!

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You have an Autoimmune Thyroid Disease, commonly called Hashimoto's. It is the antibodies that attack the thyroid gland and they wax and wane. Sometimes the person feels 'hyper' (but not hyperthyroid) and at other times hypo (low).

All blood tests have to be at the very earliest, fasting (you can drink water) and if you are prescribed levothyroxine you allow a gap of 24 hours between last dose and test and take afterward. This is the procedure to follow to make sure GP doesn't adjust dose according to the TSH when low. The fact is that if given levothyroxine, the aim is a TSH of 1 or lower but unfortunately doctors are unaware of this - it seems to me and some seem to think that if TSH reaches somewhere in the range we're on sufficient..

If you email dionne.fulcher@thyroiduk.org.uk and ask for a copy of Dr Toft's Online article re being prescribed if antibodies are present. You can then highlight this para, near bottom of page and show to GP.

GP should also check B12, Vit D, iron, ferritin and folate.

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

Always get a print-out of your results with the ranges, for your own records, and you can post for comments from members.

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Hi and thanks, all bloods taken early morning, fasting and leaving 24 hours between levo and blood draw.

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Those results do not suggest you need levo. On what basis were you prescribed it?

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I had a TSH of 44.5 (0.2 - 4.2) Free T4 10.1 (12 - 22)

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That is not a diagnosis of hypothyroidism.

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Sara71,

It's a diagnosis of over primary hypothyroidism.

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Could you perhaps tell us what a diagnosis of hypothyroidism is, please?

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So what is it a diagnosis of? With way, way over range TSH and under range free T4?

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Welcome to the forum, Karissa.

Thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies are positive for autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's). There is no cure for Hashimoto's which causes 90% of hypothyroidism. Levothyroxine treatment is for the low thyroid levels it eventually causes.

The most likely cause of the fluctuating TSH levels you are experiencing is the autoimmune attacks on your thyroid. As the lymphocytes infiltrate the thyroid gland cells are destroyed and as they die off they dump thyroid hormone into the blood stream causing temporary hyperthyroidism. This transient hyperthyroidism generally only lasts for 3-4 months as repeated cell destruction atrophies the gland causing hypothyroidism.

Many people have found that 100% gluten-free diet is helpful in reducing Hashi flares, symptoms and eventually antibodies.

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

When your TSH level stops fluctuating and has been over range on two or more thyroid tests your GP should prescribe Levothyroxine. In the meantime 100mcg - 200mcg selenium is good thyroid support and may delay progression to hypothyroidism.

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