Hyperthyroid: Hi I am new to forum. I was told I... - Thyroid UK

Thyroid UK
109,941 members127,795 posts

Hyperthyroid

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee

Hi I am new to forum. I was told I have hypothyroid in 2012 but after getting my latest results I think I am hyperthyroid after being on such a low dose of thyroxine which is 50mcg. I don't have hyperthyroid symptoms though and I don't know why?

Thank you

TSH 0.02 (0.2 - 4.2)

Free T4 25.3 (12 - 22)

Free T3 6.9 (3.1 - 6.8)

18 Replies
oldestnewest

Do you have Hashimotos ?

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to Marz

Yes

Marz
Marz in reply to Kyra-Lee

When you have Hashimotos it is possible to swing between hypO and hypER. However you have been diagnosed quite some time ....

That was going to be my question, too! Do you have Hashi's?

Do you have your results from when you were diagnosed? Have you been on 50 mcg since 2012?

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to greygoose

Yes I have Hashimotos. No I have had my dose moved about so many times I don't know what to do.

Results when first diagnosed:

TSH 44 (0.2 - 4.2)

Free T4 10.6 (12 - 22)

greygoose
greygoose in reply to Kyra-Lee

OK, so if you have Hashi's, it could very well be that when you did that test, you were at the tail end of a Hashi's 'hyper' swing.

Meant to ask, have you had other tests on 50 mcg that were in the normal range? If so, it can't possibly be that your dose of 50 has suddenly pushed you over-range.

When you have Hashi's, the antibodies attack the gland and destroy it. And the damaged cells release all their hormone into the blood, causing your levels to go temporarily high. But, it is only temporary. They will go down again. And, this is probably why your dose has been changed up and down so often.

Doctors just don't seem to understand about Hashi's swings and how they work. But, to avoid them, it's best to keep your TSH suppressed. Less gland activity means less antibody activity. Your levels wouldn't swing quite so much. Are you on a gluten-free diet and taking selenium?

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to greygoose

Thanks no I have no other tests with me on 50mcg. At the time I was on this dose I was suspected of having Addison's disease so endo was reluctant to increase

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to greygoose

Sorry not gluten free or taking selenium

greygoose
greygoose in reply to Kyra-Lee

Well, might be worth trying, to reduce antibodies. :)

Hidden
Hidden

Here's some information about Graves. stopthethyroidmadness.com/g...

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to Hidden

Thanks I think I have hashimotos and not graves due to high TPO and TG antibodies

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to Hidden

I just didn't understand why until I saw grey goose's answer I had high thyroid levels with a low dose and when first diagnosed I had high TSH and below range T4

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Kyra-Lee

Well, as long as you feel ok. Your results are only a little above range right now. Try going gluten free because gluten can irritate the gut.

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to Hidden

Thanks no I am not feeling ok at all.

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Kyra-Lee

Sorry, when you said you had no hyper symptoms with those results I thought you meant it was all good except being a little over range results. There is another thought that you have all this hormone but it really isn't entering the cells and with T3, there can be way too much and the receptors shut down for that reason. So you are not over medicated, you are under using.

Often that is due to high cortisol or very low ferritin. So the doctor who thought you had Addison's (too low cortisol), did he do a cortisol test. Low ferritin means you are using up iron for some reason.

Kyra, it gets a little complicated when you've been hypothyroid for a long time without addressing the other issues....and often they don't address other issues.

Kyra-Lee
Kyra-Lee in reply to Hidden

My symptoms are in another post. I have optimal ferritin but low MCV so I am taking iron tablets for that. And I had high cortisol found about 2 years ago.

Ferritin 78 (15 - 150)

MCV 76.2 (80 - 98)

Hidden
Hidden in reply to Kyra-Lee

From Dr. Kaslow

The MCV is decreased in:

Copper deficiency

Low stomach acid (Hypochlorhydria).

Vitamin C insufficiency.

Vitamin B6 deficiency.

Rheumatoid arthritis.

Toxic effects of lead and other toxic elements.

Hereditary (thalassemias, sideroblastic)

Iron deficiency (blood loss, parasites, poor intake, low stomach acid, etc)

After a splenectomy

Hemolytic anemia

* Note: Because anemia due to folic acid and B12 anemia are difficult to differentiate without more sophisticated tests, any supplementation of B12 should always be accompanied by Folic Acid as well, and vice versa. It has been said that an iron:copper ratio <1 on a hair-mineral analysis is indicative of both folic acid and B12 need. Folic acid and B12 should be considered in all cases of nerve inflammation, nerve degeneration blood sugar problems, nerve irritation and vegetarian diets. Often with either folic acid or B12 deficiency, there is low stomach acid. It is important to treat all of these deficiencies rapidly and effectively to prevent permanent damage.

You may also like...