Has anyone found some Brazil nuts in supermarket packets taste of chemical?

Who buys supermarket packs of 'organic' Brazil nuts for selenium?

Across however many packs, have you tasted what you think is weedkiller, sterilising fluid or chlorine - you can imagine the smell of those chemicals (not that you taste it of course) but SOME nuts are tainted and leaves the taste in mouth, after spitting them out and washing mouth out.

I want to know what the contamination is as the supermarket is in denial.

Their view is "rancid nuts" and I can assure you it is NOT THAT!

34 Replies

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  • I think it probably is rancid nuts. They grow wild in the forest, so little chance of pesticides being used.

    Of course they may be treated after collection. But the supermarket probably doesn't know what happens to the nuts before they reach them.

  • Thank you - I can tell if a nut is off or rancid and they are meant to be organic and most definitely there is a chemical taste to the odd one or some seems most packs.

  • Better to take selenium as a supplement. That way you mostly know what you are getting. Not all brazil nuts contain selenium. It depends on the soil the tree is growing in. Plants do not need selenium and they pick it up if it is in the soil.

    Canadian lentils grown in Saskatchewan contain considerable amounts of selenium because they are grown in soil that is rich in selenium.

  • I can't for some reason take tablet form, hence why swapped to brazil nuts. It is very worrying.

    I know they vary in selenium, so only do couple at a time.

    Thank u :-)

  • Why can't you take the tablets?

    Clams, mussels, oysters all contain selenium as well. Plus zinc which is good too.

    Lentils from Canada: Saskatchewan soil contains too much selenium for cattle probably because the sod has been removed by the way farming is conducted. Not good. But anyway, here's a Pubmed article about the selenium content of the lentils 99% of Canadian lentils are grown in Saskatchewan. They are a major export item. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/189...

    Chances are lentils purchased in England are imported from Canada. Check the label.

  • >Clams, mussels, oysters all contain selenium as well. Plus zinc which is good too.

    And B12! :-)

    O Canada! sainsburys.co.uk/shop/gb/gr...

  • Yup. Canada grows good lentils. We even have those French Du Puy lentils which are very nice because they don't break up once cooked.

  • I can't do seafood or shellfish either LOL.

    Thanks for the link :-)

  • the link was about lentils.

  • Thank you yes. sorry, was very tired, didn't explain :-)

    I wasn't sure if lentils was on the good or bad list, so to speak. I know I didn't like them as a child and were hard to swallow back then but appreciate have to eat things we wouldn't normally and I have cut things out too :)

  • If you buy decorticated lentils, after they are cooked there's no 'solid' pieces. And you can always use a blender to make a soup. Thin or thick, depending on what you are able to swallow. Or you can make it into a thick paste like mayonnaise. Add them to a smoothie. Lentils are a very adaptable food item.

  • I have noticed some nuts taste of soap.

  • Hmm....at least someone tastes something that isn't nut flavour - thank you :-)

  • I buy mine from a well known supermarket beginning with S. They taste lovely, and they are the only ones I've found that state on the packet that they contain selenium

    Lu

  • You are free to mention supermarket names.

    Restrictions are on the basis of spam or prescription medicines - not genuine personal experience.

    Funnily enough, I couldn't see Selenium mentioned on Sainsbury' web site. And was it their ordinary ones or their SO organic ones? Do they actually state a numeric content or just general comment?

  • They aren't the organic ones. Orange and see through bag (sainsburys colours) Front of bag they say 'high in selenium' and on the nutrition values, under Vitamins and minerals it says selenium 250ug per 100g (455% of rda) or 75ug per 30g serving (139% of rda)

    Lu

  • Thank you. Someone in Sainsbury' knows some customers are buying them for that reason, I guess. Obviously doesn't mean other suppliers' products don't have selenium but we are always going to be unsure if they do not declare.

  • Green SO Organic has selenium on pack

  • So Organic state on the pack source of selenium or words to effect :)

  • A useful amount of selenium and B12 in Sainsbury's sardines, too, with one option canned in water.

  • Need to get B12 up probably as last tested couple years back mid range and not tested since.

  • Bet it COULD be the same I have had issues from across several packs bought at different times - BUT another store mixed nuts had same sort of thing ages back.

  • you can buy raw organic brazil nuts online. I am not sure how raw they actually are but they are normally not treated the way supermarket nuts are. If you do a google search you will find a few companys that sell them

  • Thank you :)

  • I chomped through 5 kilos from Bolivia via, ahem, the Amazon.

  • Hahaha that is quite something ;-)

    I am careful but wish there was simple and cheap non invasive test so we know how much we need etc - I think there are some tests for various and you find it omits one thing you want testing but does another vice versa. So where I was iodine deficient - by taking selenium that could have been why couldn't take it - ie side effects maybe. I need another iodine test but all I can focus on is keeping roof over head but not to have too much of anything.

  • Moderation in most things, but aiming for a surfeit of joy might be the best policy.

    Some Amazon reviews complained about a short date on the nuts, but I worked out I could finish my bag well within its stated date by eating three nuts a day, and they tasted better than snack-size packs from supermarkets.

    I gave up bulk-buying when Morrisons had a long-term offer (since ceased) on 50 g packs of nuts, so walnuts and unsalted pistachios were added to my store of sunflower and pumpkin seeds. Of those, sunflower seeds are a good source of selenium, with 21% of RDA from a 1 ounce serving.

  • Ahh thank you - I may need to get more adventurous but hard with things not eaten before... the odd seed in bread when used to eat it... but never got head round so to speak... must be bolder LOL

  • I buy organic nuts but because of the cost I imagine they are not a best selling item, they can lie on the shelves for longer than maybe non-organic nuts. This is something I have noticed, often the sell by dates are not good. Even in Holland and Barratt recently I went to buy organic dried fruit which of course was a little more expensive than non-organic, the sell by date was this month, not a good way to purchase. I have noticed a tainted smell occasionally and put it down to rancidity.

  • There are often rancid or mouldy tasting ones..not good but this is like Fisons or Miltons (picture smell of)....

  • I just figured I'd got a rancid nut among the good ones. Strange how it's always just an odd nut in the bag that tastes odd and bitter rather than the entire bag.

  • I think the nuts are probably old and rancid and what you are tasting is rancid oil. Nuts deteriorate fast and organic ones can't be sprayed with anything to stop them going off. Wel all interpret tastes in different ways. Brazil nuts are boiled to remove the shells so perhaps they are boiled in chlorinated water

  • I wondered if it was chlorine as that was one of the things I considered it tasted like the smell of...

  • Hi I have been eating nuts for over 50 years. For the last 10 years from Sainsburys organic Mr Jack. Once only I had a pack of nuts that tasted old and rancid so I return them directly to the manufacturers and received lots of goodies back. Sometimes a bad bunch of nuts gets into production by mistake. Hope this helps.

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