Nodule on thyroid gland: Hi, I have received... - Thyroid UK

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Nodule on thyroid gland

Gema_b
Gema_b

Hi,

I have received results of a scan and the doctor says I have a nodule on my thyroid & that this is likely the cause of my underactive thyroid.

My question is, does anyone else have nodules? Did they remove them? Did you feel any better? Thanks :)

11 Replies
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Gema_b, nodules are fairly common. Small nodules are usually left in situ and don't cause problems. Multi nodular goiters are almost always benign and don't need further investigation but a large single nodule is usually biopsied (fine needle aspiration) to rule out cancer, although cancer is still fairly rare. Your enocrinologist will probably order a FNA if your nodule is >2cm.

My large single nodule was to be removed as it compressed my windpipe making swallowing and breathing difficult. The two small nodules on the other lobe were to be left in situ.

Gema_b
Gema_b in reply to Clutter

Thanks for that clutter, may I ask what size the one you had removed was? My dr said 11cm but I'm sure she must have meant 11mm?

Clutter
Clutter in reply to Gema_b

Gema

Nodules under 1cm are rarely a problem and often don't need treatment although they may be monitored.

My nodule was 2.8cm when scanned and 4cm when removed 5 months later. The 'lump' appeared in my neck overnight but had been affecting my swallowing and breathing for quite a long time. FNA was inconclusive but I was unlucky as it was found to be Hurthle cell carcinoma when the lump was biopsied post surgery. The remainder thyroid was removed 3 months later and was clear of cancer.

Gema_b
Gema_b in reply to Clutter

Glad to hear you were clear! Still I assume it is hard now with no thyroid at all or do you find it better?

Clutter
Clutter in reply to Gema_b

Gemma, I had very hard times for 18months because T4 monotherapy made me ill. I'm fine now on T4+T3 combination.

I had Hashimoto's and found the swinging from hypo to hyper very difficult, particularly as bloods were normal, so I wasn't on meds. Having no thyroid means I no longer have Hashi flares as the antibodies go dormant, so I'm glad to be shot of the damn thing :)

Gema_b
Gema_b in reply to Clutter

Well it's good it worked out well for you :)

Do you have to take t3 & t4 now all the time? I am only on t4 because in ireland that's the only treatment available.

Clutter
Clutter in reply to Gema_b

Gema, yes I have to take thyroid replacement every day. Liothyronine (T3) is available in Ireland but, like in the UK, it is difficult to get it prescribed and GPs often only do so on the recommendation of an endocrinologist.

Gema_b
Gema_b in reply to Clutter

Well I am hopefully going to see an endo soon so I am hoping he will be able to recommend a better treatment. He probably will just tell me to carry on adjusting my eltroxin dose to suit the ups & downs but at least I will feel I have tried :) thanks for your input :)

MikeR
MikeR in reply to Clutter

Hi Clutter,

I went to see the Thyroid surgeon yesterday after my initial FNA proved inconclusive. I had it repeated yesterday along with a whole bunch of blood tests. I am interested in how you fared with one lobe removed initially particularly with the backdrop of hashi's in play. As my TPOab's are 491 and the potential that I may need surgery after my chat with the doctor yesterday, I am very worried about being between two stalls if you like! This post seems to indicate that you're actually better off without your thyroid that is if you are treated with a combo of T4 and 3. I'd value your input. Thank you. Mike

Clutter
Clutter in reply to MikeR

MikeR, Apart from ease of breathing and swallowing after hemilobectomy to remove the nodule, I felt no better and there was no improvement in hyper and hypo symptoms.

Hashi swings stopped after thyroidectomy and I was recovering on T3 for 3 months but the switch to Levothyroxine was disastrous for me and it was almost 2 years before I was prescribed T4+T3.

While I was relieved the Hashi swings stopped the same may have been achieved with a gluten-free diet and other dietary changes and aside from no longer having Hashi's, I can't agree that thyroidectomy is preferrable to retaining thyroid function. Replacement hormone is nothing like the hormone your own thyroid produces, the effects and responses are different, and I no longer expect to regain the health I had in 2009 when thyroid was working.

MikeR
MikeR in reply to Clutter

Thank you.

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