Circadin as sleep aid

Someone recommended Circadin to me as a sleep aid, but I did some digging around and have found information that says: "Not to be used in people with autoimmune diseases such as systematic lupus erythematosus".

I have Hashimoto's. I showed this info to my GP who is quite open minded and she was not afraid to do a couple of quick google searches while I was there (I like that she feels able to do that) to try and clarify things but drew a blank. The way we left it was that she said "I think I would steer clear".

Any thoughts/information, much appreciated.

PS. Am also going to put in another separate question about sleep and hormone/thyroid balance as this question was getting too complicated.

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  • Just for info - this link may be helpful:-

    stopthethyroidmadness.com/2...

  • Many thanks for this Shaws,

    I seem fit the description given under Point 2 - early waking. I have tried having a bit of porridge with a few added seeds before bed as I had heard about the hypoglycaemic problem. Maybe I need to change my snack! I notice that she mentions peanut butter. I thought peanuts were a no-no if you have thyroid problems? (I love peanuts but have been abstaining.)

    At the moment I do seem to wake with a racing heart/feeling a bit panicky which settles after a few moments. Is there anyone else out there who has had this?

  • MacG, have you had a bad reaction to peanuts when you have eaten them? If you have, then it's best to stay away from them. But if not, then why not eat them?

    People get very confused about goitrogens - which is what peanuts are - and think you have to stay away from all of them forever. You don't. You have to stay away from the ones that give you a bad reaction. Not everybody has bad reactions with all goitrogens. I, personally, was only affected by walnuts, pears, strawberries, maise and soy. I say 'was' because now my TSH is suppressed, I don't have any problem with anything except soy - but that's another story! lol

    However, having said that, if you lived on vast amounts of peanut butter every day (or any other goitrogen, come to that), you would probably end up with a goitre (hence the name 'goitrogen'). But the good news is, the effect is only temporary. When you stop eating the offending substance, things should go back to normal (I say 'should' because there are ALWAYS exceptions to every rule!). They don't do permenant damage. But, hey, who wants a goitre! Not if you can avoid it, you don't!

    So, try eating a few peanuts and see what happens. If nothing happens you're free to eat them. Good, eh? lol

    Hugs, Grey

  • Hi

    Yes I get the same.

    I was advised by a nutritionist to eat a small amount of good quality protein before bed. I have been having cottage cheese or chicken. On the STTM link it says to eat with complex carbohydrate with the protein so I will start to do this to see if it helps.

    I will add that I have had the adrenal cortisol saliva test done which shows I have above range morning cortisol and the nutritionist said this could be caused by low night time blood sugar levels, hence the reason to take the protein before bed.

  • Hi Browny,

    Thanks for this. Do you mind me asking, do you ever wake up with a speeding heart/feeling panicky in a morning? This seems pretty par for the course with me at the moment. It settles down after a few moments, I wondered initially whether it was becuase I am maybe a bit stressed (about my health!) but am more inclined to think that it may have a physical basis - i.e., cortisol. Did have saliva tests done about 18 months ago and although my DHEA was a bit low my cortisol at that time was fine.

  • Hi

    Yes I do wake up feeling panicky and anxious, sometimes with palpitations. Like you I am anxious about my health but like to think there is physical cause for it.

    My DHEA is also low, very low and like I say above range am. cortisol but other samples in range.

    The nutritionist did say DHEA does drop before cortisol does.

    What meds. are you on?

  • Hi Browny,

    I am on 75mcg levothyroxine daily. I was only diagnosed 18 months ago (Hashimoto's) and did seem to be making some headway. But not been feeling too brilliant last few weeks and a couple of weeks ago at my annual review my readings had dropped back a bit:

    TSH: 0.22mu/L (0.3-5)

    T4: 14.7pmol/L (11-23)

    T3: 3.5pmol/L (3.9-6.8)

    While my TSH is nice and low my T4 and T3 have dropped back. Am struggling to get T3 in range.

    How about you?

  • Hi

    I take 100/125mcg. levo alternatively

    but still do not feel right.

    I was on 125mcg. daily but endo. told me to cut back as my TSH was supressed at 0.5

    My T4 and T3 are mid range.

    I think your T4 is low and your T3 is under range, so think you need your levo. increasing.

    Members on here say T4 and T3 should be in the upper quadrant to feel well.

    I am trying to get my supplements sorted then if I do not feel any better I am going to ask to take the 125mcg. daily again.

    Have you had the usual tests for iron, ferritin, folate, B12 and Vit D done?

  • Hi Browny,

    I am seeing my GP tomorrow about those latest test results - shall I let you know how I get on?

    Yes, I have had all the usual tests done. I should have said in my previous post that on a daily basis I also take Ferrous Sulphate (my anaemia is now much improved) and Vit.D3 for osteoporosis. Supplement-wise I also take magnesium, a range of B vitamins, Vitamin C and some high strength fish oils on a dialy basis.

  • I was hoping someone would spot my comment about peanuts! Thank you for taking the time to respond. No, I haven't noticed any bad reaction to peanuts. Just been really trying to steer clear of anything that might rock the boat.

    When you say a "bad reaction" what do you mean?

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