New paper on T4 therapy and need for dual therapy in some subjects

There is a new paper at present online written by an eminent thyroidologist Prof W Wiersinga. In it he questions the universal use of T4 monotherapy and the pitfalls of TSH as a test. Its too long to append here but if an admin person would mail me their email address to (address removed as no longer required) I'll send it as an attachment via straight email to you so that you can broadcast it as you feel fit.

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  • Thank you. I have sent you an email :)

    Carolyn x

  • Diogenes, I thought that you would like Prof. Wiersinga's articles, you and he think a lot alike. Are you referring to

    Prof. Wiersinga's editorial,

    eje-online.org/content/161/...

    or has he published a new article?

    It has to be "Paradigm shifts in thyroid hormone replacement therapies for hypothyroidism"

    Like you, Prof Wiersinga thinks T4 with a sustained release T3 might just be the ticket. However to really mimic human physiology you need a variable release T3. I know you don't believe this yet but the circadian rhythm of TSH and T3 do seem to have an effect on the adrenals. Paul Robinson has now replicated his results in hundreds of other thyroid patients. It will probably be years before science catches up.

    OrangeGirl sent me off in a different direction and I have been reading about intergenerational trauma in the First Nations, but no biochemistry or DNA studies that I have found so far. PR

  • It is this one :)

    nature.com/nrendo/journal/v...

    Carolyn x

  • Diogenes, I got a look at the first page and it looks like an interesting article. He gives a good overview from what I got to read. It is always curious to those of us who need NDT to survive how 'dogma' so pervades so called medical science. If you look at the two random, double blind, crossover studies that have been done on T4 mono-therapy versus NDT or Syn T4/T3 they both had 49% preferring the combination. In the NDT study only 19% preferred T4 and in Dr. Nygaard's study only 15% preferred T4. The remaining percentage for both studies was 'no preference'. So combination T4/T3 has been used for 123 years, is preferred by 49%, and yet it is considered 'experimental' therapy at best, and routinely denied to those of us who do better on it, how curious. PR

  • I would be willing to be included in a study for this as I feel I should be on T4/T3 combination after being hypothyroid since 1980 post-operative Graves. Janet.

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