will this help anyone do you think

Hello i have just signed up to this site, having been reading up about thyroid problems and your posts.I dont want to insult anyone by what i want to say and i am not making light of your very real problems. i have had a blood test for this and was told that if the reading was the same next time i would be on tablets for the rest of my life.I was on the very low side of normal.I started taking better care of myself,but for some reason i craved bananas and i dont even like them, but i started eating them,to cut a long story short tonight i looked up are bananas good for you .

T o my amazement they regulate your thyroid ,lower blood pressure,produces tryptothan which makes serotonin that helps with low moods and depression.Has potassium which sorts out your circulation and also sorts your water levels and the carbohydrates sort out your sugar levels and iron which sorts out anemia., they also act as an antacid.and i have not had a problem with acid reflux since i started eating them either .

I have a great improvement in how i feel ,maybe it would help make some of you feel better.

Also one of your posts has a woman with hot flushes after coming off hrt.

When i was in the menopause i was drinking soya milk as the doctor advised me to cut out milk for chronic sinusitis.,when the women at the art class were discusing hot flushes all had the symtoms of flushing but not me.i also found out Japanese women didnt complain of them either as they eat tofu which is soya beans. I did stop taking soya for a while as i didnt like that eitherTHEN i got flushes.,so i went back on it the flushes stopped.

as hormones are the problem it wouldnt hurt to try these natural methods would it,please let me know what you think

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17 Replies

  • Hi, yes it is interesting what you find out when you start researching foods for Thyroid. There are many foods that are beneficial but you have to note when the best time to take them is i.e. NOT with thyroxine etc... drinks also. This week I have learnt honey is best daily. :)

    And yes when I can stomach a breakfast its always half to an hour after the morning thyroxine and it's a ...banana! Just seems to do it all for me though I couldn't measure exactly how beneficial it is regarding feelgood etc.

  • Hi the info said that 3 small bananas was a good dosage daily break fast ,dinner and evening ,it also said it stops morning sickness at this dosage.but i wont be needing that bit of advice seing as im 66 but i have tried this week eating two daily and i am not craving biscuits etcand i feel stronger and more settled ,havnt had the dips of sugar levels dropping. now what else can i try ,i think i like a good scientific experiment lol must get to bed nice to hear from you nightzzzz

  • Hi Zelda, good tip re the bananas, i'm going to stock up today. Re the soya though, there's a raging debate going on. Google 'soya and thyroid' and have a look. I've got horrible heartburn these days so I hope the bananas do their magic for me. All the best x

  • Hi I do hope they work for you ,i also found info years ago that pinapple and papaya taken before a meal,as a starter,puts enzymes into your stomach and aids digestion .I have done this and this also works. As with everything moderation works ,i found a small amout works such as in a small tin of pinaple a single ring of them is enough. Eating fruit after a meal is not a good idea it causes the indigestion for me .Hope it all works for you.

  • I like bananas but like children I couldn't eat three. :)

  • Hi Beaton Go on i dare you,----bananas that is

  • That is certainly interesting, zeldasmith. You are not insulting anyone. I have found that if I eat bananas I don't get the night cramps which plague me.

    But If, as you say, your thyroid is on the low side of normal, too much unfermented soya could lower your thyroid activity further. Soya is not very good for the health of the thyroid. Thyroid problems are extremely common in Japan, and it is no coincidence that Hashimoto's thyroiditis was first recognised in Japan. It is true though that soy does, indeed, have healthful properties when fermented:

    "As dangerous as unfermented soy is, fermented soy from organic soybeans is a different story altogether and can be a beneficial part of your diet. Fermented soy is a great source of vitamin K2, and K2 (combined with vitamin D) is essential in preventing osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, dementia, and various types of cancer." This comes from:



    Tofu is among the soya products which are not recommended - this is of course for daily consumption. Japanese people eat tofu but not every day. Their main soya consumption is fermented which is safe - soy sauce for example.

    The apparent benefits to the menopausal woman is that it contains oestrogen-mimicking chemicals which relieve the menopausal symptoms. There is, however a school of thought which says it is better to replace with bioidentical hormones, both Oestrogen and Progesterone, to avoid Oestrogen dominance which is often a problem in menopause.


    Dr Mercola does not condemn soya at all -but he does recommend care as to which form of soya you eat.

    Marie XX

  • Hi Maram wow the soya situation is scary ,i only used it for a short while years ago .I am now glad i did not use it for longer. I had thought about what replaces the hormones and gives balance. I felt i needed that at the time but couldnt find the answer.This link i think would help lots of people .thanks for your reply zelda

  • After I posted this I thought I hope you didn't think I was trying to shoot you down, I was truly concerned, I am so glad that you didn't take offence. There is quite a lot out there about soya.

    I think Dr Mercola has some very interesting articles, but I admit I always try to find other evidence to back him up. I do hope that your thyroid does not get worse, keep looking on here and posting - it's lovely to have new people on here, the more the better!

    I like the idea of the pineapple and papaya - I know papaya is good, I am not a great fan of pineapple unless it's really fresh and sweet. I'm equally fussy about Bananas, I think that's because I never tasted one for the first few years of my life - post-war shortages!

  • My husband can't believe how fussy I am about bananas, I like a certain type with a certain look and a certain size and shape i've always been fussy about them and in the winter Im even worse, you have to be really careful they haven't been frosted. My husband just smiles indulgently when we are (I am) choosing bananas. It is a science.

    There are some pretty good pineapples on sale at the moment too and at only £1 each - dare say the poor producers are being completely screwed if the supermarkets are selling them at that price.

    Liz :-)

  • I cannot stand ANY fruit and veg chilled. It destroys their flavour and texture. In the 40s and 50s - even to the 60s - bananas were shipped in HEATED boats - they were picked green - and the greengrocers would order what they could sell that day. When the new supplies were received the next day, the 'old' ones were sold off cheap because they had black spots on the skins.

    That was standard, FRESH veg almost every day. Day-old stuff sold off cheap which helped the less well-off. Nothing was really wasted. They used to sell off the 'tops' of Brussels Sprouts which I loved because they were even sweeter than spring greens. The food had more goodness in it because they always had it really fresh.

    Now, the supermarkets keep the fresh stuff in the chiller until the old rubbish has been sold off, so it goes out on the shelves already old and ruined. They won't sell something cheap until it is completely unusable. No wonder so many people are suffering from malnutrition.

    I only buy stuff like soap and cleaning supplies in supermarkets. I go to markets for fruit and veg, the butcher's for meat, and get fish delivered direct from Cornwall the day it is caught, and then I freeze it to keep it fresh.

    This seems to have turned into an anti-supermarket rant!

    Maybe I should also mention that when I saw Dr Peatfield recently he said that my healthy attitude to food was what had kept me going despite 55 years of thyroid problems, 30 of which I had been less than well cared for.

  • You are what you eat - as they say.

    Bet you felt really pleased when Dr P said that :-)

  • I did give myself a sly little pat on the back. And a little thankyou to my deceased mother for passing on to me a good attitude to food and cooking.

  • So agree. Note to others,never pick fresh goods from the desplys at the front of the store,these are often bagged produce that has passed its sell by date.

  • I try not to buy anything packaged, because the plastic they use is an oestrogen disrupter. Not that I've probably got much oestrogen left to disrupt. lol. ;)

  • I didn't find that soya milk did anything for my menopause symptoms except make me more tired and windy. I felt better not taking it, although miso soup helped a bit. Only biohrt did it for me.

    I sometimes eat bananas but find them hard to digest. I think I get more than enough potassium anyway and my BP is quite low. Frozen bananas make a great ice cream substitute BTW.

  • This is interesting re Bananas mainly and pineapple. Since having a right hemi-thyroidectomy I have been craving banana milk and have pineapple every morn on my Weetabix..... May start eating bananas on my brekkie alternate days. I am also euthyroid but did have a lot of thyroid symptoms??

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