Having a slight melt down help! trying to get diagnosed for hypo and having a moment!!!

hi i just wondered if someone could look at my results and stop me losing the plot im trying to get diagnosed for hypo they say that my results are within normal ranges waiting for a endo appointment its 6 months after my baby was born am feeling terrible lm having a moment where im doubting myself that i could be wrong lots of symptoms of hypo i ticked a lot of them of hypo list my relatives are making me begin to doubt i could be wrong and its not my thyroid and iv got myself in a tizz sorry to bother you with this but i could really do with a good opinion heres my last 3 test results in 6 weeks i posted some fnumbers wrong a while back i just not feeling confident with the figures and what they mean thanks anyone that could have a look and save my sanity i was doing so well at keeping it together sniff !

19/06/2013 bloods

protien level 5.0 mg/L

tsh 1.55 mU/L 0.0-6.0 range

t4 8.2pmol/L 8-18 range

t3 5.3pmoll

20/07/2013 bloods

no protien results

tsh 9.77 mU/L 0-6.0 range

t4 9.0pmolL

24/07/2013

tsh 5.7 0-6.0

t4 8.9 8-18 range

ANTIBODIES 0.6 RANGE 0.0-9.0

sarax

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  • Hi Sara, you sound just like me. Is it all in my mind, do I really have all these symptoms?perhaps positive thinking would work.

    Even diagnosed by an Endocrinologist I have my doubts. Why, because you are told if your tsh is within range then there's nothing wrong with you. My GP who I had been with for only a short time had drilled this into me. Insisting I needed antidepressants. I was lucky to be diagnosed with my tsh just over range. Slow ankle reflexes was the icing on the cake. Early days for me yet, with a long ahead I know.

    It is so hard being a new parent, but this is your second child and you know the difference. Dont give up, you know your own body and you shouldn't be feeling like this. X

  • thanks sparky ! I realized that when i woke up and feel terrible this morning it def not in my head thanks for coming to my assistance with my moment melt down what a nightmare it all is i just ache and my down front of neck always aches and burns all day and all the other rubbish stuff i seem to improve at teatime not quite as exhausted though, even though still unwell so i will battle on and get sorted i really hope you get sorted i have been told that my best friends step sister was diagnosed with a under active thyroid after her little boy was born she was very poorly with it i think it took a while for here to get right dose of meds but she great now and back working as a teacher so there is hope she looked fab last time i saw her so least you have been diagnosed its a huge step in right direction x

  • Sarah get your GP to do an antibodies test as your TSH was 9.77 on 20th July and then was down the following week. Someone will clarify but it may be that you have Hashimotos thyroiditis which means sometimes your thyroid pumps out at intervals excess thyroid hormone. This is an excerpt:

    There is a paper discussing the fact that early treatment of euthyroid (normal thyroid hormone levels) Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis with thyroxine may slow down the disease process. There is also evidence that shows that anti-thyroid antibodies can cause infertility and miscarriage. It is therefore a good idea to find out if you have high thyroid antibodies and discuss treatment with thyroxine with your doctor.

    and another

    The 2006 Thyroid Function Test Guidelines state, “There is no evidence to support the benefit of routine early treatment with thyroxine in non-pregnant patients with a serum TSH above the reference range but <10mU/L.” which in layman’s terms means that patients who have a TSH of less than 10 need not be treated because it doesn’t help. However, they also state that, “Physicians may wish to consider the suitability of a therapeutic trial of thyroxine on an individual patient basis.”

    If your TSH test is above the range but less than 10, it might be an idea to discuss these Guidelines with your doctor as it may persuade him to give you a trial of thyroxine. In our experience, patients with signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism who have a normal TSH and low normal FT4 also benefit from a trial of thyroxine.

    thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/diagno...

    It is such a struggle to get diagnosed when GP's are reluctant. Thyroxine in itself is harmless as it is a natural hormone - they will rather prescribe anti-depressants (no blood tests available) on symptoms of which depression is also a symptom of hypo and not give you a trial run.

    When you post your blood test results always put the ranges as labs differ throughout the country and it makes it easier to respond. I think your T4 may be on the low side but without the range I'm not sure.

    The link above gives good information - it's a pity we have to learn and to know more than the GP's whom we rely upon to look after our health. A B12 deficiency can also give similar symptoms so get that done too.

    If your GP is going to do another TSH get your bloods done as early in the morning as possible as that's when your TSH is highest.

  • thanks shaws sorry here are my ranges as follows i did not realize they all diffrent i did have bloods done at diffrent times of day each time 2 morning one afternon so maybe this is why i also had a antibodies test which was 0.6 ref 0.0-9.0 not sure what that means, iv got a blue horizon test t4 tsh which im going to do first thing monday morning when i wake and send it off as i dont think they going to test me again for while thanks for taking the time i will do my best to stay positve and take onboard what you said i do seem to e at low end but not sure what means

    19/06/2013 bloods

    protien level 5.0 mg/L

    tsh 1.55 mU/L ranges 0-6

    t4 8.2pmol/L 8-20 ranges

    t3 5.3pmoll 3-4.8

    20/07/2013 bloods

    no protien results

    tsh 9.77 mU/L 0.5- 6.0

    t4 9.0pmolL 8-20 range

    24/07/2013

    tsh 5.7 0 -6 range

    t4 8.9 8-18 range

    sarax

  • If any of you want conclusive proof about being hypo.. just take your temperature for 10 days every morning as soon as you wake. If your temp is under 97.. you're hypo.. Full stop - (unless you slept outdoors after a bottle of whisky, which would also lower your body temperature) You do it for 10 days to rule out an infection or ovulation which could artificially boost your temp.

    Mine went as low as 95 but now I'm on armour I don't worry about any blood tests at all. I take 3g vitamin C Magnesium B co-enzyme Q10, Ginseng, selenium, and codliver oil and my armour and I feel good, have lost weight ,back to work and even able to go out after work

    It took a long time to stabilise.. but I only bother getting a blood test if my temperature fluctuates.. don't get too obsessed with your results

  • thanks redditch for your post i will do this and log it iv got a braun ear thermometer il try it im so glad you feel good thats brilliant, hopefully i will get sorted soon im supposed to be going back to work beginning of december as maternity leave ends so we see how we go but i think they be ok whatever.you right not to be obessive about the results it s just i dont understand them and was worrying how can it be such a wide range and be such a battle to get any help

    thanks again

    sarax

  • the trouble with blood tests is that what's optimum for you doesn't bear any relation to what's good for or, in range for anyone else.. we're all different... The only really valuable blood test is a test for absolutely everything when you feel totally fabulous because only THAT will tell you what's right for you...

    TSH testing is fundamentally flawed because if you can't convert T4 to T3 then you could have normal or even supressed TSH and actually still be very hypo and poorly... so a low TSH means NOTHING.. A high TSH however.. is a valuable test but still no good without an accompanying low temperature.

    this is from a Dr SHAMES (I know!) but he's a good guy.. the 5 myths of hypothyroidism

    I recently had the opportunity to interview Richard Shames, MD about his new lecture series on common thyroid misconceptions. Dr. Shames, whose credentials include Harvard, University of Pennsylvania, and National Institutes of Health, is a practitioner and author with over thirty years experience in developing better thyroid care.

    Mary Shomon: Why, Dr. Shames, do you categorize certain common practices as "myths"?

    Dr. Shames: Mary, when the incorrect belief is so widely and stubbornly held by both practitioners and consumers, it needs a special name. Health information alone is not sufficient. One needs to know the quality of that information, to best use it. Misinformation can be very harmful.

    Mary Shomon: What in your opinion is the leading thyroid myth today?

    Dr. Shames: Thyroid Myth Number 1 is TSH IS THE ONLY TEST NEEDED TO GUIDE BOTH DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THYROID IMBALANCES.

    Total unshakable faith in this one, simple, over-rated blood test has caused years of untold harm to millions of people. Based on the tyranny of that one test, doctors refuse treatment to a great many who need it, AND keep others on too low a dose of medicine once they do get treated.

    Mary Shomon: Many thyroid patients are aware that recent research studies have seriously questioned the absolute validity, as well as the excessively broad normal range, for TSH testing. Even the endocrinology community is not in agreement over the "normal reference range" for TSH tests.

    Dr. Shames: Definitely. But the overwhelming majority of doctors, clinics, laboratories, and insurance companies are still not swayed by that compelling research. Instead, the idea is even more entrenched. But for many thyroid sufferers and practitioners, that idea is not science. It is a myth.

    Mary Shomon: What is the next thyroid myth?

    Dr. Shames: Thyroid Myth Number 2 is LEVOTHYROXINE IS THE ONE AND ONLY TREATMENT MOST ALL THYROID PATIENTS WILL EVER NEED.

    Once again, multiple research studies and numerous practice experiences have shown this to be a potentially harmful myth. Yet it's surprising how completely sold on this myth most doctors and patients are around the country. I constantly hear about it in my telephone coaching with thyroid patients across the nation.

    Mary Shomon: What about the patients needing complementary thyroid support for adrenal function, progesterone, and vitamin D?

    Dr. Shames: Luckily vitamin D's importance is lately getting good traction, in both the patient and doctor populations.

    But something else is unfortunately getting less traction. And that is Thyroid Myth Number 3: NATURAL DESICCATED THYROID IS UNSAFE BECAUSE OF ITS VARIABLE POTENCY.

    Here is the truth. Natural desiccated thyroid drugs (Armour Thyroid and Nature-throid are two common brand names of natural desiccated thyroid in the US) are known to be safe and effective. In some patients, they are superior to levothyroxine, even when the T3 medications are combined with the standard T4 (levothyroxine).

    The accusation of variability in natural thyroid drugs is an example of an enduring myth. Actually, the FDA has repeatedly found synthetic thyroid (levothyroxine) to be variable in dose per pill.

    Unfortunately, insurance companies are now on this mythology bandwagon. Some have recently begun writing to patients and doctors saying they will no longer cover natural desiccated thyroid prescriptions. They recommend a switch to levothyroxine, even though it is more expensive. This is a strange choice for insurance companies to make, but they are starting to do it. They have obviously bought into the mythology, perhaps because of influence from large drug manufacturers who seek to reduce competition from less expensive natural thyroid.

    Mary Shomon: What is your next thyroid myth?

    Dr. Shames: Thyroid Myth Number 4 - KEEP DOSES OF THYROID MEDICINE LOW, TO REDUCE THE RISK OF OSTEOPOROSIS AND HEART PROBLEMS.

    This is an unfortunately persistent myth, based on outdated research. More recent studies clearly show that thyroid medicine, in doses people actually need, is not harmful to the heart or bones.

    This myth is particularly problematic, because when this advice is followed, people end up at greater risk of osteoporosis and heart problems. Under-medicated hypothyroidism is a common unrecognized cause of low bone density and heart palpitations, and subclinical hypothyroidism has been linked to various heart problems. Too little thyroid also can result in compensatory high adrenaline levels, which makes the heart very jumpy.

    Mary Shomon: What's your final thyroid myth?

    Dr. Shames: Thyroid Myth Number 5: ONCE YOU START THYROID MEDICINE, YOU NEED TO STAY ON IT FOREVER.

    This is one of my all-time favorites, and is an example of a myth originating from a partial truth. If your thyroid gland has been entirely ablated by radioactive iodine or removed by thyroid surgery, then this advice is true for you. On the other hand, for the large majority of thyroid patients who still have a functioning thyroid gland, this advice is a potentially harmful myth.

    For example, many people need thyroid medicine due to a temporary autoimmune flareup during puberty, postpartum, or menopause. These patients may not need to stay on thyroid medicine for the rest of their lives.

    In fact, it might be better for many of them to carefully wean off. Yet, they end up staying on thyroid pills forever, because they or their doctors have bought into the mythology.

    Also it takes some ongoing care to wean off thyroid medication properly, and to know when to go back on it, if need be. In today's rapid-fire, quick visit type of health care, a supervised trial of discontinuing thyroid is frequently avoided by busy practitioners.

    Forcing potentially healthy people into forever needing to see doctors and pharmacists is not in the long run a wise use of precious health care dollars.

    Dr. Richard Shames is author of a number of books on thyroid disease and health. His most recent book, Thyroid Mind Power, explores the connection between thyroid disease and mental health.

  • thanks for that redditch its very helpful some very interesting points and answers and very informative indeed ,i think you spot on with the that the blood test that you need the results from the one when you feel great i did try see if id been tested in the past as it had crossed my mind already as had a few blood tests over years and have 2 children now and was in good health until few months after the birth of my baby but typical no records of thyroid tests to back me up, but might be for other levels that might come in useful, better give them ink cartridge at the surgery. i will keep my mind open and i already know there is a good chance that if i get diagnosed that thyroids can get better after time with post thyriodism if that what it is iv got im just presuming as it fits in with everything but we shall hopefully get sorted soon

    My thermometer ready for the morning ( :

    many thanks again i really appreciate your replies sarax

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