Pernicious Anaemia Society

Vitamin B12 Deficiency common in Primary Hypothyroidism

Looking for something else, I came across this research.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed...

"There is a high (approx 40%) prevalence of B12 deficiency in hypothyroid patients."

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Not sure that the link works, not for me anyway. Just ended up on a general page. However, I definitely have hypothyroidism, so no surprise there. I read somewhere that high thyroid antibodies can also indicate PA. My thyroid antibodies are sky high. I'm on thyroid capsules. Just need to get the B12 sorted!

Cheers!

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This link should work better:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/186...

I really hope you get somewhere with your doctor LadyNZ - this research just shows how interlinked the two are but GPs still don't seem to get it!

The research is from Pakistan, where they probably see and understand B12 def. better than they do in the West.

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Quote from the article "...a placebo effect cannot be excluded, as a number of patients without B12 deficiency also appeared to respond to B12..." Haha. They also mention that people who were within 'normal range' complained of symptoms and 40% 'had a good clinical response'.

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Why do they always jump to the placebo effect? Why not some aspect of the B12 other than its essential role?

I often wonder whether B12 (other than cyanocobalamin) might not act to mop up some substances - like its use after smoke inhalation. In hypothyroidism there might well be accumulation of various substances due to poor metabolism.

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I know, the placebo effect response is utterly infuriating.

I think your theory re hypothyroidism is plausible, and I imagine there must be many conditions helped by B12 even if not caused by a primary B12 deficiency. One GP even said he thought I had nervous system damage but that he couldn't say why or what may have caused it, and (of course) there was no treatment...and yet, here I am, improving with B12 injections. I also had long term nerve damage in one leg from excessive misplaced pressure on a massage course (GP: "there is no treatment...") - the B12 is helping that as well - the leg is coming back to life with heat and tingling.

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Perhaps the GPs should take note of these questions in the House of Lords recently:

"To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they are taking to address the problems associated with the late diagnosis of perniciousanaemia, in the light of the results of the survey published in the British Nursing Journal in April 2014."

"To ask Her Majesty’s Government how they propose to alert medical practitioners to the severe and irreversible nerve damage that can occur when pernicious anaemia is misdiagnosed." Countess of Mar - Crossbench

theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?i...

I'm glad your leg is coming back to life Frodo.

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Nor do they admit that the testing for B12 Def has to come out of the dark ages. It has shown itself to have so many totally unrelated health benefits....like taking cyanide from the body. ..that logic should rule that there should be other ways to test for B12 itself.

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Well I have underactive thyroid, and low B12, and fibromyalgia. My GP has agreed to trial me on more frequent B12 injections and I have felt much more energetic. Still have quite a few aches and pains, but I am wondering if the low VitD might be partially responsible for that? So I'm now supplementing that too. MariLiz

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...don't forget the FT3 level too :-) Needs to high in the range for you to feel well ....

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Thanks for that Marz, unfortunately I haven't been able to get that tested. I did pay to see an Endo privately, and although he wanted me to have T3, the NHS won't agree to prescribe it. I have written to ask his advice, but heard nothing further from him except a bill for my last consultation. More than a little disappointed. MariLiz

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