Anesthesia

Has anyone with Parkinsons had a colonoscopy or endoscopy? My husband has been diagnosed a year ago. He is 77 years old, but doing very well. He only takes Azilect right now. His main symptom is a tremor in his right hand. He also has to be monitored every three years for colon polyps and mild possible Barrets Esophagus. So far so good. But just wondering if there are any unusual after effects of the short use of the anesthetic Propofol. They no longer use Versed, I'm told. Thanks!

28 Replies

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  • I have had it several times. The only thing that I noticed was that I was sleepy for a day after. Other than that, it was fine. Hope this helps.

  • It does! Always helps to hear from others who have experience. Thanks!

  • The only side effect I had was a 36 second fart.

  • Hahahaha, I think that's a good sign!

  • And here I thought that was the Blue Angels passing overhead, Hal!

  • Umm. Well, that's reassuring! Ha

  • My husband with Parkinson's has had both done really recently with no problems afterwards. He is 77.

  • i HAVE HAD 3 COLONOSCOPIES DURING THE 12 YEARS I HAVE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH PD, ANTICIPATE A 4TH PROCEDURE NEXT SPRING. HAVE BEEN ON AZILECT ONLY BRIEFLY .

    A T THAT TIME WAS A WARNING, THAT WOULD HAVE TO SCHEDULE GETTING OFF, IF SUBJECT TO ANESTHEIA. i WAS NOT TAKING IT DURING ANY OF THE PROCEDURES. OTHER MEDS NOT AN ISSUE.

    BILLAVID

  • No Problems.

  • I have had several colonoscopies since being diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. No long-term negative effects but it did take me a couple of days to get back to myself. The first time I had this reaction I had been asked to drop off a stool specimen at a local lab. I drove over two days after my colonoscopy. As I pulled into the parking lot and broke into a cold sweat. I cranked up the air conditioner and reclined the seat until I felt steady again. I walked into the lab holding my little brown bag of poop and as I reached the reception desk began to feel faint again. I asked if they had any orange juice, they said no, and I fainted. They called the EMTs who took me into a room and reassured me that many people pass out while giving blood. I explained to them that I was not giving blood but giving poop and we all had a good laugh.

  • I see that I have my work cut out for me.

    touche

  • This is a very timely question for me. I am actually scheduled to get both colonoscopy and upper endoscopy in two weeks ans was wondering what I am in for. I am 60 this month and on Sinemet and Neupro patch as well as amantidine. Thank you for sharing this; the replies have been helpful to me as well.

  • I suggest avoiding PROPOFOL. Terrible experience for my colonoscopy in 2015. Only benefits the doctors. Insist on sleeping agents or go without. Propofol killed Joan Rivers .

  • @Tmarsella thanks for your reply and concern. He went ahead with the procedures yesterday and is up and feeling well today. Guess some will have a reaction to any anesthetic sometimes. I had the same thing and didn't have any repercussions. I was mainly concerned because of his Patkinson's, but thankfully, all went well. :)

  • Oh, and wouldn't think of having it awake! Yikes!

  • Btw, he did stay on his Azilect. Didn't miss a dose. That's all he's taking though.

  • Hi Mlitt Ihave the same problems that your husband does. Barrett's every year and colonoscopy every 3 years. The propofol is what they use now. I had no reactions to it at all. Came out of it ok with no problems. I have DBS for my Parkinson's and I did just fine.

  • Thanks for everyone's responses!

  • I think the thing to consider in this situation is not the anesthesia, but the anti-nausea drug that is typically given alongside the anesthesia. So called "anti-emetics" often blo k dopamine as their method of action and need to be avoided during procedures. I would be in contact with the gastroenterology group as soon as possible to make sure that they are aware that your husband has Parkinson's to be certain that they understand the alternative drug that should be considering. I recommend everyone get The aware in care kit (www.awareincare.org) or at least assemble something similar on their own. You can also learn more about contraindicated medications with these handouts from the Davis Phinney Foundation davisphinneyfoundation.org/...

  • @jdjunk thank you for your reply. He has had the procedure and all went well. But will read your info for future reference. His doctor did know he has Parkinson's, but not sure this was discussed. Thanks again.

  • Actually, as I read over this list, I see metoclopromide, which used to be given with the prep, in case you get nauseated drinking all of it. Our current doctor gives half the prep the night before, then the rest the next morning. Then does the procedure around noon. It was so much better! Didn't cause any nausea because he didn't have to drink a whole gallon of that liquid the night before. Maybe this knowledge will help someone else. :)

  • I'm glad he had a good result. In my opinion, the prep is always the worst part of the procedure. As you mentioned, metoclopramide is definitely one of the contraindicated medications for Parkinson's. Thanks for the additional follow-up, hopefully someone else will benefit from this information

  • My comment isn't about anesthesia, but about colonoscopies, but the timing was good for this post. A guy at the gym today told us that the cleanse he did before the procedure made his tremors stop. I'm not sure for how long, but that sounds like something for a researcher to think about, if they haven't already??

  • I am 77 and live in the UK. I was diagnosed 10 years ago and have had both colonoscopies and the upper one as well, plus a systoscopy. In my experience the prospect of all of them was far worse than the event.

    Hope all goes well, God bless

  • You do not know how lucky you are:) In Norway, sedatives are not used at all for colonoscopy. And, I can assure u, any sedative is better than none. I have had 4 such, the 3 first without sedatives, and it is extremely painful and unpleasant. The last on I managed to get sedatives after some very long and hefty arguments, and as such, being able to choose sedatives is an incredible luxury problem:) So, I think you should be more than happy, getting sedatives at all :)

  • Can't even imagine how you go through a colonoscopy without at least a sedative. That's pretty cruel.

  • Just making sure it was not a sigmoidoscopy.

  • I have about one a year since 2007 when they found a DALM which is precursor to cancer. i was offered a coloneptomy but refused . I have been clear ever since I started to show symptoms of atypical parkinsonsms shortly after an operation to remove a lump in my kidney (also in 2007) which turned out to be benign, which they said was coincidental I have since been diagnosed with atypical psp but at the moment am quite OK and independent do not take any drugs for Parkinsons but I am on asacol to control my colitis. which is under control at the moment.