Writing your own GP letter for PiP: Well I phoned the... - NRAS

NRAS
26,230 members30,064 posts

Writing your own GP letter for PiP

Well I phoned the surgery today to ask how I would go about getting a letter from my GP to support my PIP claim. A very nice lady told me that is a charge of approx £25 to get a letter and it would be helpful if I could write what I wanted the letter to say and then drop it into the surgery!

I was a bit put out, to say the least, but needs must.

Any tips on what to include in the letter?

19 Replies
oldestnewest

Hi never heard this one before. Maybe some other members have .I would try get doc to confirm your mobility issues that you struggle to do 20 or 50 metres wot ever applys to yourself and care and help you get etc .Ot letters and physio is stronger letters and any rheumatology letters saying your struggles if there is any letters some hospital letters are good should be no charge.you can get a print out of your gp visits with the notes that is free lots surgery now doing that .good luck with the letter only send if you think it is helpful .let us know how you get on with letter maybe a new thing with surgery.

3 likes
Reply

How much are you charging them to write the letter that they are charging you for?

Ajay has better advice than the nice lady at the drs me thinks!

Ali

2 likes
Reply

citizensadviceteignbridge.o...

Some good guidelines on here to help you too!

1 like
Reply

Thanks Deb, this is really useful.

Reply

I never sent any medical reports as I was unwilling to pay. Also, many GPs decline to write these types of reports as they are inundated. I just put their details on the form and gave permission for the DWP to make contact. I don’t know if they did or not but I was awarded PIP and I wasn’t charged any GP fees. I took a risk in not sending any medical letters but felt it paid off. On both a personal and professional level (I’m an adult social worker), I don’t know how valuable these medical letters actually are. As you have found out, medical professionals often do not have the time to make a full and independent assessment, hence why people have independent DWP medical assessments.

Hope this has been helpful.

3 likes
Reply

Yes, very. My original thought was not to send anything. I really dont see the point in me writing a letter for someonecelse to sign. Either they will contact my healthcare professionals or they wont. Thanks

1 like
Reply

You are much more likely to be successful if you have supporting letters. The assessor is unlikely to just take your word.

Reply

That is not true, I am on a PIP forum and so many are not awarded with mountains of medical evidence written by GP and consultants. PIP is not about what illness you have it is how you manage day to day activities.

Reply

I'm on PIP too, the assessor untrained in medical matters, assesses your ability to look after yourself irrespective of which label you have. But all evidence is looked at, if you insist it is. Having evidence is critical to being awarded what you are entitled too..

I had a 12 page document with me which I put together and submitted at my assessment interview, not before.

So when asked for example , ridiculous questions like can you make a C shape with your thumb and index finger. I could say no, and the letter on page 3 , from the specialist hand physio outlines my difficulties with my hands which prevent me doing ......shall I read it out to you ?

I was awarded my PIP.

My advice is always be prepared, always have evidence and always show you know your condition, limitations and all.

Reply

I wrote my own letter to support my medical retirement application and the GP signed it. £130.

But I got my medical retirement.

The advice above from CAB is useful.

Reply

The truth about you r illness, symptoms, how often you need the docs, how it affects your daily life should suffice. Even with a doctor's letter and all medicaL reports, I found it so difficult to get PIP. Applied 3 times before it was approved. Good luck.

1 like
Reply

Hi you are right cheylann also sometimes letters are better for esa and hold no weight for pip .the stronger letters are house adaptions ot reports and physio about restrictions etc and specialists and your helpers and carers and evidence of aids

Reply

Hi the only evidence I sent in was a confirmation of my diagnosis. From what I have been told it's not the illness you have but how it affects you that they are assessing you for.

I got awarded the standard daily living of pip after 3 attempts!

The assessors are like traffic wardens for DWP!

Sending you big hugs. Hope your claim is successful xx

Reply

Hi, I would advise to get a letter from your GP and Rheumatology Consultant; I had letters from both and didn't have to pay anything for either of them. I did however have to pay £25 for a report and photo's from an MRI scan of my feet. The DWP do not ask for any letters from either now. Be well prepared especially from your assessor as it will be them who prolong your claim. Take care.

Reply

Just tell them about how the illness affects you doctor will put it all on the letter

Reply

In my experience from working at a GP surgery (although a few years ago) any agencies dealing with benefit claims, etc used to send forms requesting information to the GP regardless of whether the patient had sent in evidence already. We used to advise people not to pay for any sort of letter to support a claim themselves as the assessing agency has to pay for completion of their forms anyway. GPs are no longer allowed to write letters/reports in NHS time and have been told by NICE that this should be classed as a private service.

Reply

The mind boggles!!! Not write letters on NHS time???? Would love my disease to only be on NHS time what ever that means?????

Reply

Oops unless you pay for it off course 😊

Reply

Thanks for the explanation. I knew someone on here would know what's going on!

Reply

You may also like...