Question for the year-plussers

Hi there year-plussers!! :). Congratulations on reaching a fantastic milestone!

Not sure if my question really belongs in this forum, but here goes anyway...

I'm only 3 days into my quit and I'm just curious to know if being a non-smoker is now totally automatic for you 'veterans', or do you still have to fight it from time to time?

20 Replies

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  • Welcome and well done stopping smoking.

    My answer to your question is, I no longer crave or think about them regularly. I occasionally have a thought of one which is usually in a situation I used to smoke in but it is only a memory not a desire to smoke.

    I used this forum and the friends I made here daily. When you share how you feel, others will post to help you and your story will help someone else.

    There are lots of websites in my signature, I believe they contain the best knowledge possible to help you stay stopped. Allan Carr's book was also a favourite.

    Best wishes, a day at a time and you will be a winner.

    Jackie

  • I still want one from time to time, but it is more like a 'fancying a cup of tea'

    type craving than a 'would slither naked across broken glass to get one' type craving :eek:

    The longer you stick with it the easier it becomes and to be honest I am starting to forget how hard the first few weeks were now.

    I do still have the occasional moment when I can't believe I did it (I usually have very little will power), it is without a doubt the most difficult thing I have ever accomplished.

    My dad/sister and brother (who all still smoke) all say they can't believe I have quit and that if I can do it anyone can (I smile smugly and say why don't you then? :D)

    To all new starters, please don't give in, it will make an unbelievble difference to your life to quit and remain quit!

  • Welcome and well done stopping smoking.

    My answer to your question is, I no longer crave or think about them regularly. I occasionally have a thought of one which is usually in a situation I used to smoke in but it is only a memory not a desire to smoke.

    I used this forum and the friends I made here daily. When you share how you fee,l others will post to help you and your story will help someone else.

    There are lots of websites in my signature, I believe they contain the best knowledge possible to help you stay stopped. Allan Carr's book was also a favourite.

    Best wishes, a day at a time and you will be a winner.

    Jackie

    Thanks for sharing your experience Jackie.

    That's very encouraging to hear that it's possible to be a non-smoker without continually being conscious of making that choice (like I am at the moment!). I've only been here a short while and I've already found the encouragement from the members here invaluable and I hope to return that to others in the future.

    Once again thanks, and very well done on your fabulous achievement. xx

  • I still want one from time to time, but it is more like a 'fancying a cup of tea'

    type craving than a 'would slither naked across broken glass to get one' type craving :eek:

    The longer you stick with it the easier it becomes and to be honest I am starting to forget how hard the first few weeks were now.

    I do still have the occasional moment when I can't believe I did it (I usually have very little will power), it is without a doubt the most difficult thing I have ever accomplished.

    My dad/sister and brother (who all still smoke) all say they can't believe I have quit and that if I can do it anyone can (I smile smugly and say why don't you then? :D)

    To all new starters, please don't give in, it will make an unbelievble difference to your life to quit and remain quit!

    Thanks EndsNow. Great name BTW :).

    I'm very encouraged by yours and Jackie's posts, in particular you both mentioning the cravings decreasing in intensity over time. My day seems to start and end reasonably well with the afternoon causing me most agitation. I'm holding strong so far though.

    I did quit once for 9 months about 7 years ago but in truth I can't really recall much about it now, so this is all new to me again.

    Thank you again for the encouragement :).

  • Hello Cap'n Crunch

    Would say everyone is different.

    No longer crave cigs and haven't for a long time - but for me there was a big element of relearning how to live without addiction, the change was the biggest challenge for me.

    I still want one from time to time, but it is more like a 'fancying a cup of tea'

    type craving than a 'would slither naked across broken glass to get one' type craving :eek:

    The longer you stick with it the easier it becomes and to be honest I am starting to forget how hard the first few weeks were now.

    I do still have the occasional moment when I can't believe I did it (I usually have very little will power), it is without a doubt the most difficult thing I have ever accomplished.

    My dad/sister and brother (who all still smoke) all say they can't believe I have quit and that if I can do it anyone can (I smile smugly and say why don't you then? :D)

    To all new starters, please don't give in, it will make an unbelievble difference to your life to quit and remain quit!

    Hello Endsnow, we quit in the same month methinks, congrats to you on being 17 months?

    M

  • Hi CC

    Well done on day 3 my love, fantastic.

    For me, I still fancy a ciggie but it's not the same as the craving in the early days. It's more like when you fancy a bar of chocolate, you would like one but then you remember it will make you fat so you don't bother!! Hope that makes sense.

    xx

  • Hiya

    I'm only a very recent recruit myself to this 12 month stage....

    I still THINK of smoking every now and again, but I don't want to smoke. If I look back at myself at the beginning of my quit, I would NOT understand what I'm saying now!

    Seriously, I don't want to smoke right now.

    Best of luck to you - it's SORT of automatic being a non-smoker now!

  • Thanks MAH, Christine and MadCatWoman.

    It's good to hear that the cravings eventually diminish to a distant memory. I woke up with a major craving this morning but after replacing the patch it seems to have eased somewhat. One day at a time!!!

  • Hi. I'm two years quit in feb 11. It does depend on the person but I agree most of its practice. I rewired my brain. Made myself aware of associations to smokes and triggers rejoiced in craves. Each time I had a crave it meant I was still a non smoker. I used logic to work out most craves weren't craves but things that mimicked them. I still think of smoking occasionally. Sometimes I will have a wobble but 95 percent of the time I forget I was ever addicted. Keep going. Ride the craves. The grass is much greener on this side!

  • Over 2 years for me and I occasionally get a nostalgic fancy for one but its nothing much.

    I smoked for nearly half my life so the idea that I don't have the occasional fond memory of smoking would be unrealistic but nothing that would encourage me to act on that feeling.

    I feel no affinity with smokers any more, I see them as junkies in denial!

  • One Step at a Time

    I decided to come back here today because last Sunday marks the third year I've quit. Like others have said, it isn't easy but all you really have to do is take it one step at a time. I know this doesn't sound believable but it's true: after each craving the next one is incrementally smaller. You just have to chip away at it over time and eventually it will reveal a new you.

    Best of luck with your quit. You will be glad you stuck with it! Three years from now maybe you can check in here and give someone some encouragement.

    Rob W

    Method: Cold Turkey

    Date: 17 October 2007

  • Congrats on your quit. To answer your question,I think of smoking on a daily basis ever since i quit.My wife recently quit do to some medical problem so maybe I will not think of them quite as much.

    Good luck on your quit.

    dubbs47 - Free and Healing for Two Years, Ten Months, Twenty Six Days, 7 Hours and 41 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 162 Days and 3 Hours, by avoiding the use of 46698 ciggys that would have cost me $17,078.39.

  • Hi there year-plussers!! :). Congratulations on reaching a fantastic milestone!

    Not sure if my question really belongs in this forum, but here goes anyway...

    I'm only 3 days into my quit and I'm just curious to know if being a non-smoker is now totally automatic for you 'veterans', or do you still have to fight it from time to time?

    Hello - I'm at two years and if you still can (don't know how far back you can get) check out how I started! I went kicking & screaming into a quit & don't actually know why I resisted so long any more.

    Yes I'd like one now & then but I am pretty much automatic. I've never been allowed to switch off completely though as my husband still smokes, so things like landing at an airport & having to wait before getting the hire car, or shopping, timing a fag between shops - I still remember these habits because I have to accomodate them. If I didn't have that reminder I'm sure it would be much easier to completely switch off. Keep at it.

  • It took me many years of thinking of myself as an ex-smoker rather than a non-smoker. Maybe this was because I have smokers lung, not really sure. But at some stage in the last few years, I started identifying as a non-smoker, and no, no cravings - it would kill me, and life is too enjoyable now without the cigarettes.

  • Hi Captain :D

    Like Jackie and Fiona I never want a fag anymore sometimes a memory will surface briefly but in no way is it a crave hun just a thought like Oh I'd have had a fag about now sort of thing it's gone almost before it's there though

    Hold on tight and keep going it soes get easier the further you go promise

    Love

    Marg xx

  • Thank you to everyone who's replied here :).

    I'm so envious of all you guys having done so well in your quits. Kudos to each and every one of you!!

    It's so comforting to hear that things are a lot easier that far down the road than they were at the beginning. I'm so looking forward to being in that place too!!

    Here's to a smoke-free future for all of us!

    Ed xx

  • My thoughts for what they're worth. 12 months [just]

    It was strange moving from I haven't had a craving for X minutes/hours/days to I haven't thought about smoking for X hours/days.

    I doesnt bother me other people smoking, but I did a big DIY job the other week and it really hit home. The stop and think moments where you're not really sure how to do something were always big fag, coffee and a sit down and have a ponder moments. A biscuit really doesn't cut it.:)

    Stick with it though, you know it'll be worth it.

  • A biscuit really doesn't cut it.:)

    Agreed , but it helps :p Bourbons, gingers, custard creams.

    Yes, those stop and stare moments ....... other goodies come along to fill those moments. Give it time and some thought ..... those who are determined and consider work-arounds, get there :cool:

  • Its tough quitting especially if you are truly addicted, is it worthwhile, definately. I still think about fags quite often but had the chance to smoke last week and would not have had one if you had paid me. I think I miss the habit more than the nicotine, I still look for my tin sometimes and then remember I dont anymore lol.

    Keep going, one day at a time, but it gets easier. If you have time read my post forum.nosmokingday.org.uk/s... it might help.

    Dee:)

  • Missing the habit rather than missing the nicotine is such an accurate statement. On the last few weeks I have had so many times when I have thought 'if I could have a cigarette now this will not escalate' (I am going through a rough time!). However, how I have dealt with this is when that thought hits my mind I think, ok, so normally I would make an excuse for a fag now, so lets make an excuse for a time out'. I have left the situation for about 5 minutes, and you know what, the time out is enough - does not need a cig to make it better!

    My only problem is the one person I am in the dilemma with is the one who hates smoking the most - so guess what is the easiest way to hurt him?

    Ph well, guess that is the next problem!

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