Resources to share #2: I learned today that... - My OCD Community

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Resources to share #2

Selesnya profile image
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I learned today that a post won't show up in the recently active list if it is over three months old. The suggestion was to create a new topic, so that's what I'm doing.

The old thread is here:

healthunlocked.com/my-ocd/p...

You probably didn't see my last post in that topic on podcasts.

My next resource that I've found helpful is Shala Nicely's blog:

shalanicely.com/aha-moments/

There are a lot more posts there than it seems like on first glance. You can find the complete list of posts here:

shalanicely.com/all-aha-mom...

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Thank you, Selesnya for your kindness in sharing. I am in the process of reading "Fred".

Gimi44 profile image
Gimi44

Thank you for sharing, for a person like me who has not access to ERP treatment educating myself with podcasts and books makes the whole difference. My OCD stories and Kimberly Quinland are my favourites

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Selesnya in reply to Gimi44

Just to follow up on this, I have started to listen to some of Kimberley Quinlan's podcasts, and they are wonderful. If you want to find her podcast, search for "Your Anxiety Toolkit" or you can see a list of episodes here:

podcasts.apple.com/us/podca...

Some of my favorites so far are episode 93 with Dr. Reid Wilson on How to WANT Anxiety and episode 87 with Kristin Neff on All Things Self-Compassion. I've also found episodes 76 and 78 really helpful in exploring how to tell other people about your mental health struggles.

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Selesnya in reply to Gimi44

By the way, the more I listen to Your Anxiety Toolkit, the more I like it. The genuine warmth, compassion and understanding there is reason enough to listen to it. The fact that she has useful things to say about OCD and anxiety is a great bonus.

Hi Selesnya - Are you still with us? It's been a while since we've heard from you. Hope you are doing well.

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Selesnya in reply to

I’m still around, but I’m on vacation right now with limited internet access. There are a number of replies that I would have liked to make, but there’s only so much typing that I want to do on my phone.

in reply to Selesnya

Well, you have a GREAT vacation! You deserve it.

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Selesnya

Here's a nice handout from Shala Nicely on traps that we fall into when dealing with relapses or slips in dealing with our OCD:

shalanicely.com/wp-content/...

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Selesnya

Here is a really incredible episode from Kimberley Quinlan of Your Anxiety Toolkit:

kimberleyquinlan-lmft.com/e...

Aside from the main story of the episode, Kimberley's reflections on what it means to "fail" are intriguing. What if failure is just an idea? Do we even have to buy into the concept of failure? Outside of tests of knowledge where things can be evaluated as failures of understanding or having mastered a concept, how useful is failure? Isn't it just an experience that didn't meet our expectations? How is that a failure?

This has me ready to seriously rewrite some of my motivational script that I've been working on.

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Selesnya

The episode of This American Life this past week was on CPT as a method of dealing with trauma:

thisamericanlife.org/682/te...

As an uninitiated and clueless person, it was really interesting to get a view of how to deal with trauma through therapy.

Also related to trauma, these episodes of Your Anxiety Toolkit deal with OCD and trauma:

kimberleyquinlan.libsyn.com...

I'm trying not to overwhelm everyone with suggestions, but these were both super interesting.

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Selesnya

This is an interesting article on choice, but really it is all about the proper approach to OCD and ERP:

theocdstories.com/podcast/d...

It is over two and a half hours, but full of good content. Highly recommended!

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Selesnya

A Liberated Mind by Steven Hayes

amazon.com/Liberated-Mind-P...

This isn't an OCD resource by itself, but more of a way to live flexibly and how to approach mental health in a resilient manner. This is the resource that seems to tie together everything that I've been reading about OCD and mental health. This is a full framework on how to live better and not be controlled by your mind and thoughts.

There is a strong focus on stopping avoidance, which all of us with OCD need a strong reminder about, but he continues to talk about how to have a balanced view of mental health overall. Not avoiding is not the only thing that we need to work on, and this book shows you were else to focus your efforts. This is ACT, applied directly and accessibly.

I am only a third of the way through the book, but it is the most cogent, lucid explanation of how to live a good life that I have ever seen. I couldn't wait to get through the whole book before recommending it to everyone here. And by everyone here, I mean everyone everywhere. This should be required reading for people with OCD and for everyone that doesn't have OCD.

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