Log in
Macular Society
2,465 members1,180 posts

Eye injections for Macular Oedema

Hello everybody,

I am new on here so not sure if I am doing this right! I have been told I have macular oedema in my left on. I do have type 2 diabetes, which I have had for the last 5 years. I have been told that I will need injections in it. I have been so worried about it as I can’t stand the thought of a needle going in my eye!!!

Can anyone give me the truth on how it feels please? Thank you in anticipation.

19 Replies
oldestnewest

Hi Sarah. Firstly sending you a hug x diagnosis and the thought of the treatment can be a difficult time so be kind to yourself .

The injections should not hurt. You may find the cleansing drops sting a bit but your eye will have anaesthetic drops. Honestly the thought of it is the worst thing. If you can check out u tube video - I did and saw the woman having it done didnt flinch - it really helped me to see that!

Make sure you tell them it's your first time and you're nervous, ask for lots of anaesthetic drops and hold the nurses hand. Breathe. Relax ( I count or remember song lyrics in my head) , keep looking in one place as they tell you and it will be done in seconds. A little scratch or slight pressure ought to be the worst ( not as bad as a poke in the eye with a mascara brush lol) and you may not even feel that.

Ask them to wash your eye well after too as residual cleanser can make it sore later.

Come back and tell us how you got on. This is a great forum and we all ' get it'.

The macular society is brilliant for info and support too.

7 likes
Reply

Thank you so much for that. It has made me feel a little better but until the first one will still be a bit nervous. Thank you so much though.

2 likes
Reply

I am still nervous for the last few seconds, don't think I'll ever find it easy but it does get easier the more you have. Here's hoping you don't need many x good luck x

5 likes
Reply

Hi Sarahdoggy.

Sorry to hear of your diagnosis. I was very nervous too back in January when I found I had to have injections in my eye. Everyone on here will have felt the same I think. It's an awful thought isn't it?

I always tell myself it's a quick process and soon over with. The actual injection takes a few seconds. It's all the eye drops and cleaning that takes time. The first couple of times I was very stressed and it was more uncomfortable. As I have learned to relax it seems far less bad.

The staff have been lovely and so kind. There's always a nurses hand to squeeze if that helps you.

You will be fine and the main thought to hold on to is that the Injection will help you keep your sight. It's got to be worth a few seconds of 'uncomfortable'

Best of luck to you. G

5 likes
Reply

First of all, sorry to hear of your first diagnosis, which is always devastating. We, on this forum, have all been there and can appreciate how you feel. So, I would like to say: Welcome to our club, even if another sort of club may be preferred. You'll find the many wonderful people on here are ready to support you as they have helped me for advise and through low moments.

Eyesright has pretty much told you all you need to know for now. If you want the truth, the injection may be a little bit more than just pressure or a scratch as they have been or me on 8 out of 10 occasions, depending on how adept the injector is. But any pain only lasts for seconds. In time you will get yourself emotionally prepared for the injections although I too still have last minutes nerves. The rest of the time I try to forget about them. Keep yourself occupied with things you enjoy doing. It is not the end of the world.

Sending you my best wishes, Sarah.

4 likes
Reply

I love all the above replies Sarah, and I wish you the very best. When I was first diagnosed I found the Macular Society a life saver. macularsocity.org, Helpline 0300 3030 111.

the only discomfort I found was when I was home and the anaesthetic drops wore off. Ask for a small vial of anaesthetic drops to take home. Huge relief I found. Also a lot of advice re this, and everything else from the Macular Society. Good luck!

3 likes
Reply

Thank you fed13. X

Reply

Don't worry Sarah. You will not see the needle or feel it. You may get a little discomfort after the anasthetic wears off but you are usually given eye gel which eases this. The initial worry is the worst it gets. All the best for a pain free first experience.

2 likes
Reply

Thank you so much for all my comments. Much appreciated. X

Reply

Hi Sarah, please do not be frightened, the injections are worth it to prevent further deterioration in eyesight. It is really scarey at the time, my parents both had AMD when there was no treatment so I consider myself fortunate. The needle is tiny and it is only a tiny amount going in the eye. The staff are really nice and will hold your hand if necessary. On injection day I get all my chores done day before, meal prepared, clean towels, flannels and pillowcases ready. The iodine stings a bit and is probably the worst part of it. When I get home usually on bus, i put tea in oven and then relax in evening with a glass of wine and put my feet up. Don't be alarmed as your vision will be affected by the eye drops etc for several hours afterwards. I don't put anything in my eye afterwards for 24 hrs so as to keep eye free of infection, we used to be given drops. Having said all that after my first injection I was subdued and took 2 paracetamol and laid on bed for couple of hours. I have got used to it all now and have even gone out for meals and singing in the choir. Diversion is a great pain reliever for me. I wish you all the best, relax, keep calm, all will be fine.

1 like
Reply

Thank you ivyRose. Much appreciated your kind words.x

1 like
Reply

Everyone has given you good advice

Just to say, I've lost count of the number I've had but it is around 40

And I'm fine so you should be.

2 likes
Reply

Thank you Stokes.

Reply

I honestly do not feel the injections I have pain about 2-3 minutes after they r working with me to help make it the best it can b I get extra numbing drops and a complete eye wash after and then a gel put in my eye it has seemed to help I also take Advil or cataflam right before appt good luck to you do u know what kind of injection u will b getting I get eyelea

Reply

Hi thom3patty, no I don’t know yet. They are letting me go another 6 months before injections! Thank you for your kind words. X

1 like
Reply

Sarah, may I suggest you call the Mac society for advice? 6 months to wait for a first inj seems an awful long time ( but may be in line with diabetic guidelines I'm not aware of - Mac soc will know best).

Ps I didn't say last time but I take 2 paracetamol about an hour before inj and then regularly afterwards up to the limit of 8 in 24 hrs.

Reply

The initial thought of the injection is, for most people, infinitely worse than the injection. The anaesthetic drops are VERY effective. I have had 82 plus a stetoid implant and can genuinely say that I have never felt anything with any one of them other than slight pressure after I had had around 50. This is due to scar tissue.

Reply

Thank you so much for that Rennatk. Very much appreciated. X

Reply

Dear Sarahdoggy.

We have injection buddies at the Macular Society. These are volunteers who have had the injection themselves. They are willing to talk to individuals via the telephone, who are about to have an injection for the first time.

Please contact us if you feel that this may be of some help.

The Macular Society helpline is open 9am – 5pm Monday to Friday on 0300 3030 111.

Alternately, you can contact us via:

help@macularsociety.org

Kind regards,

2 likes
Reply

You may also like...