THE ANNUAL RED MAGAZINE FERTILITY REPORT 2011

Brigid Moss has kindly shared the results of the 2011 annual RED magazine survey; we have also included details of her new book which is also available on Kindle; both are available at infertilitybooks.co.uk

BABY RECESSION: 1 IN 4 WOMEN FORCED TO RECONSIDER OR DELAY HAVING A BABY AS A DIRECT RESULT OF THE RECESSION

BABY PRICES HAVE DROPPED MORE THAN HOUSE PRICES, WITH THE AVERAGE AMOUNT WOMEN WOULD PAY TO CONCEIVE DROPPING BY 20%

The recession is having a direct effect on birth rates, with one in four women being forced to delay or reconsider having a baby, according to the 2011 Red National Fertility Report.

The results, published in Red’s October issue out on Tuesday 6th September 2011, shows the effect the recession has had on women trying for a baby - from how much they would be prepared to pay in order to conceive, to postponing motherhood due to redundancy and the rising costs of living. The report surveyed over 2,500 Red Magazine readers aged 30-45.

Key findings include:

•? The recession has resulted in a 25% drop in babies tried for, with 10% of women saying the recession had made them postpone trying for a baby, and 15% saying they’d decided not to try at all.

•? Baby prices have dropped more than house prices – with the average amount women would be prepared to spend to conceive dropping from £15,000 to £12,000 – a 20% drop in just 12 months. * The average house price is down 2.65% from July 2010 to £163.981 – Halifax House Price Index.

•? The percentage of women who would be prepared to spend £50,000 to guarantee them a baby has dropped even more dramatically from 10% to 6% - a 40% drop over the same period.

•? Following increased financial pressure on the NHS, when it comes to offering free IVF, 62% of women don’t think it should be available for anyone who wants it - this is up 17% from 2007 (45%). This suggests that when funds are tight, fewer women perceive having a baby as a right for all.

•? Due to lack of IVF on the NHS, 61% have paid for IVF privately, with only one in five getting all their treatment for free.

Sam Baker, Red magazine Editor-in-Chief said of the findings; “This report provides

an incredible in-depth view on the effect the recession has had on women’s baby plans.

The comparable figures show that the last year has hit women and their families hard,

with many having to postpone or reconsider trying for a baby.

Brigid Moss, Red magazine Health Director said of the findings; “Fertility treatment can be expensive, and this report shows that fewer people have been able to afford it, while the NHS provision for fertility treatment remains a postcode lottery. The report shows that having problems trying to conceive and treatment is also stressful, too. Both of these factors only add to the stress of someone who’s having problems trying to conceive”.

THE REPORT IN FULL:

MONEY

•? The recession has resulted in a 25% drop in babies tried for, with 10% of women saying the recession had made them postpone trying for a baby, and 15% saying they’d decided not to try at all.

•? Baby prices have dropped more than house prices – with the average amount women would be prepared to conceive dropping from £15,000 to £12,000 – a 20% drop in just 12 months.

•? The number of women prepared to spend over £50,000 to guarantee them a baby has dropped even more dramatically from 10% to 6 % - a 40% drop over the same period.

•? Due to lack of IVF on the NHS, 61% have paid for IVF privately, with only one in five getting all their treatment for free.

•? A staggering 100% of women surveyed would, or have, cut back on school fees to pay for fertility treatment. 94% of women say they would cut back on all aspects of their lives to pay for fertility treatment if they needed it (includes holidays, eating out, pensions, savings, health insurance, clothes and selling possessions).

•? Most women paying for fertility treatment have said that the money came from savings (88%), but 17% received a gift or loan from their family, 13% took on extra work and 13% put fertility costs on their credit card.

•? 23% would consider moving / down-grading their house to get free NHS IVF provision to help them conceive.

•? 17% of women who need fertility treatment have been prevented because of the costs, and 12% said the recession has directly prevented them from having treatment or more treatment.

GOVERNMENT POLICY / NHS

•? Following increased financial pressure on the NHS, when it comes to offering free IVF, 62% of women don’t think it should be available for anyone who wants it - this is up 17% from 2007 (45%). This suggests that when funds are tight, fewer women perceive having a baby as a right for all

•? 74% of women believe the government should ensure women are provided with three free cycles of IVF on the NHS.

•? 95% think it’s unfair that there are different NHS IVF provisions depending on where you live.

•? Nearly 60% believe that women should be given IVF on the NHS even if they have a child with their current partner, rising to 90% if they have a child from a previous relationship.

•? BUT 62% don’t think that IVF should be available on the NHS to anyone who wants it.

SUCCESS CONCEIVING

•? 23% of the women asked have had problems conceiving.

•? For those who have had IVF treatment, 38% have only had it once, and 10% have had it more than five times.

•? When it comes to the success of IVF, 45% got pregnant and had a baby, 31% didn’t conceive and 5% conceived naturally.

•? 18% would consider going abroad for treatment if provisions were not available at home.

STRESS

•? Fertility treatment is more stressful than the recession - 59% found it more stressful than dealing with financial concerns.

•? 40% find the process more distressing than the ending of a relationship.

•? Three in four (71%) found it more stressful than moving house.

•? Nearly two thirds (62%) found fertility treatment more stressful than being made redundant.

•? A third of women (36%) said that fertility problems made them depressed with 2% even signing off work due to stress / mental health problems.

•? Nearly half of women(47%) said their husbands found it hard to cope when they were not getting pregnant.

EGG FREEZING

•? 27% of women have considered freezing their eggs for the future.

BRIGID MOSS, RED’S HEALTH DIRECTOR IS AVAILABLE FOR COMMENT:

About Brigid Moss: Brigid Moss is Health Director of Red magazine, and author of new book IVF: An Emotional Companion. She has been a health journalist for 15 years. She has personally experienced infertility: her son, now aged four, was conceived on her first IVF cycle. She has since had one failed IVF cycle, then one that ended in a late miscarriage earlier this year.

IVF: An Emotional Companion (Collins, £12.99) by Brigid Moss, is the story of 23 women’s fertility journeys, told in their own words. It was written to help anyone who’s trying to get pregnant to understand the fertility process and help them make treatment decisions, but also to show her that they aren’t alone, that others have been through the same experiences – and have come out the other side. Chapters cover all aspects of fertility.

Brigid's book is available on our Amazon store - infertilitybooks.co.uk

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