Another potential PD therapeutic drug? - Cure Parkinson's

Cure Parkinson's

18,924 members19,608 posts

Another potential PD therapeutic drug?

Canddy profile image
Canddy

this drug seems promising although they need to get on with the clinical trials

alzforum.org/therapeutics/i...

24 Replies

here are the technical details behind the drug:

the-scientist.com/bio-busin...

Very good find! Great research digging that one up. It seems rather buried.

The acquisition of Inflazome by Roche suggests that someone is optimistic about their approach.

inflazome.com/press-release...

redhawk1 profile image
redhawk1 in reply to jimcaster

Yes, Jim, Roche must be seeing something they liked in Inflazome! Just wondering out loud if in some way they are thinking of combining some aspect of their current antibody experimental drug with the anti-inflammation drug knowhow just acquired? Hoping there is something at the end of the rainbow.

Canddy profile image
Canddy in reply to redhawk1

You may be right redhawk1! I found a recent post regarding clinical study results for Roche's antibody drug says the drug "may revolutionise Parkinson’s disease treatment".

pharmaceutical-technology.c...

Indeed it may in combination with Inzomelid (Inflazome).

redhawk1 profile image
redhawk1 in reply to Canddy

Hey Canddy . . . thanks for inclusion of article! Had not seen that.

Here's a story from this forum from two years ago which caused some excitement for me...but here we are two years later...frustrating.

healthunlocked.com/cure-par...

cclemonade profile image
cclemonade in reply to jimcaster

States that it would have to be reformulated bc it is "off patent." Maybe that is contributing to delays. ?

jimcaster profile image
jimcaster in reply to cclemonade

Probably true. Slightly annoying...but understandable, I guess.

Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome activation is a very useful tool in multiple inflammatory disease states such as PD, AD, Flu, pneumonia and Covid-19 to name just a few applications.

It is worth noting here that one of the ways that melatonin is able to reverse Covid-19 so rapidly, prevent the cytokine storm and prevent Covid pneumonia is through potent inhibition of activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome, but you already know that melatonin does much much more when it comes to PD, if you read this forum much.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/268...

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/320...

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/280...

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/298...

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

As you can see from the above studies and abstracts, melatonin's ability to inhibit the activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome is not limited to any particular area of the body but is effective in multiple locations including the brain.

Melatonin does much much more, is readily available, is inexpensive and helps protect all major organs of the body while having a very good safety profile that would be enviable by almost any available drug in the world.

Art

Dragona profile image
Dragona in reply to chartist

Hi Art I give my husband 10mg a day I am so afraid of giving more would he have side effects, would it make him more sleepy, already his energy levels are very low and is it something he should take in the day, he takes it at night now, thank you for all your help you do some excellent posts

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to Dragona

Dragona,

It is the same size dose (10 mg) that produced positive effects in a PwP study last year and although other studies have reported positive results for other diseases at high dose, there are currently no really high dose studies specifically for PD. Here is a link to the study from last year :

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/324...

Here is a link to a 50 mg study in PwP that "barely" started to show motor symptom improvement during off time :

sciencedirect.com/science/a...

Compared to this new RCT using 250 mg / melatonin / day in diabetic patients that showed a significant positive response in just 8 weeks :

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Art

Dragona profile image
Dragona in reply to chartist

Thank you, you are so kind

cclemonade profile image
cclemonade in reply to chartist

Regarding Melatonin, Interesting that it states that it does not reduce insomnia but does improve motor symptoms. And 50 mg a day, that is a lot. After reading what you previously posted about this Art, I increased from 3 mg to 10 mg a night. Based on your research, do you have thoughts on that amount for nightly use?

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to cclemonade

Yes, It is in line with what was used in the 10 mg study that showed modest improvement in non motor symptoms in PwP. I wish the recent 250 mg study that showed significant benefit in T2DM patients had also been done in PwP!

My main interest is seeing what exactly a similar 250 mg /day study will show in PwP over 3 to 6 months. Well I can dream!

Tolerating melatonin is the first and very important step.

Art

cclemonade profile image
cclemonade in reply to chartist

Perhaps I am being daft but I am not understanding how your comment is about what Canddy posted about, prasinezumab.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to cclemonade

I was replying directly to the first link that Canddy posted regarding Inzolemid in the original post above.

alzforum.org/therapeutics/i...

Read the the link that Canddy posted. It is all about how Inzolemid inhibits activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome as its main method of action. They used MCC950 as a comparator because it has known qualities of inhibition of activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome.

Inzolemid has only just completed a phase 1 study one year ago, which means it is going to be some time before it can potentially be marketed for the purpose if at all.

My point is that melatonin is already proven in studies to do the same and more and is available now and is inexpensive. How is that not relevant to the link that Canddy posted?

Art

cclemonade profile image
cclemonade in reply to chartist

Art, I apologize that my comment left you thinking I was doubting the relevance. I truly was not. I was sincerely trying to understand the relationship between prasinezumab and melatonin. I get your point now. Thank you for explaining.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to cclemonade

I see it now, we were looking at 2 different posts by the same member. I had not seen the other post and was replying to the original.

Art

cclemonade profile image
cclemonade in reply to chartist

I honestly don't know what I was looking at when I wrote my original message but I was confused about the relationship. I truly did not mean to be rude. Sincere intention can be lost in writing. Do you have additional thoughts on pasinazumab? I understand it is very early. Hasn't there been a lot of attempts at targeting a-synuclein? But with this one they state that motor function decline is reduced.

I have a lot to learn about the history of research to better understand the current research.

chartist profile image
chartist in reply to cclemonade

I think it has potential, but this link below suggests that melatonin does about the same as Prasinezumab and more based on other studies.

hh.um.es/Abstracts/Vol_28/2...

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Melatonin is already available, has a very good safety profile, inexpensive and the many other related studies I have posted on the forum confirm that melatonin at high enough dosing is likely to be be useful in the fight against PD through multiple pathways and mechanisms, but the 250 mg/day study is lacking for further confirmation.

Art

cclemonade profile image
cclemonade in reply to chartist

Thank you Art.

"prasinazumab seen to lower motor function decline by 25%" but then "its mechanism of targeting a-synuclein is yet to be proven clinically."

Your finding this makes me wonder what else I have not yet discovered that is going on. BTW, CPT posted a lot of youtube videos about 4 weeks ago. I just happened upon them the other day and am working my way through them.

You may also like...