Coagulation factors in PCa

New study below.

I have written about coagulation factors a number of times, suggesting that we monitor D-dimer and fibrinogen. Nattokinase can bring both number back down.

"This was a prospective controlled study, which included three cancer patient groups and a control group of healthy individuals. The cancer subgroups consisted of renal (n = 44), prostate (n = 56) and bladder cancer (n = 47). We excluded patients receiving anticoagulant therapy, or with significant comorbidity. In all patients, certain coagulation parameters were measured (prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, partial thromboplastin time, D-dimers, fibrinogen, F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex)."

"D-dimers and fibrinogen were increased in prostate cancer"

I'm glad I have been doing the right tests.

"Further research should ... focus on their role in the association of cancer with thromboembolic events."

How about advice on how to prevent such events? LOL

How about exploring the role the number play in metastasis?

-Patrick

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/280...

Int J Urol. 2016 Dec 22. doi: 10.1111/iju.13271. [Epub ahead of print]

Role of coagulation factors in urological malignancy: A prospective, controlled study on prostate, renal and bladder cancer.

Alevizopoulos A1, Tyritzis S2,3, Leotsakos I4, Anastasopoulou I5, Pournaras C6, Kotsis P5, Katsarou O5, Alamanis C6, Stravodimos K6, Constantinides C6.

Author information

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To study the behavior of specific coagulation factors in different types of non-metastatic urological cancers, and to identify their possible role as diagnostic and prognostic markers.

METHODS:

This was a prospective controlled study, which included three cancer patient groups and a control group of healthy individuals. The cancer subgroups consisted of renal (n = 44), prostate (n = 56) and bladder cancer (n = 47). We excluded patients receiving anticoagulant therapy, or with significant comorbidity. In all patients, certain coagulation parameters were measured (prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, partial thromboplastin time, D-dimers, fibrinogen, F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex). Statistical analysis was carried out to explore the association of hemostasis markers with tumor-nodes-metastasis stage, Gleason score, transitional cell carcinoma grade, Fuhrman grade and prostate-specific antigen.

RESULTS:

Our final sample consisted in 58 control patients and 147 patients with urological cancer. We found specific patterns of increased coagulation factors in the different cancers that were statistically significant. Renal cancer showed increased levels of D-dimers, partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen. D-dimers and fibrinogen were increased in prostate cancer; whereas in bladder cancer, only fibrinogen was elevated. Correlations were found between certain factors and tumor stage and grading, with D-dimers being independently associated with higher tumor grade. Thrombin-antithrombin complex was associated with Gleason score. Furthermore, D-dimers, fibrinogen and F1 + 2 were associated with higher tumor stages (II-IV).

CONCLUSIONS:

The coagulation pathway seems to be activated in urological malignancies. Specific panels of coagulation factors might play a role as screening or prognostic tools in earlier stages of renal, prostate and bladder cancer. Further research should also focus on their role in the association of cancer with thromboembolic events.

© 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

KEYWORDS:

bladder cancer; hemostasis factors; prostate cancer; renal cancer; tumor markers

PMID: 28004432 DOI: 10.1111/iju.13271

[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

1 Reply

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  • As you know Patrick I take both the Nattokinase and the Serrapeptase--both consumers of Fibrin, Not only the fibrin in the blood, but there are some interesting papers suggesting that Serrapeptase, can also cause defects in the outer shell of the cancer cell, as it is believed to be of a fibrous nature---the thinking being to put holes in the Pca cell's armor to allow T cells to get in. I do not have enough info--other than some trial using Serrapeptase--But if you all that are reading this what to keep your blood thin, and doing so without having to take blood thinners that attack Vitamin K---then this is the route to take---If you are already on Blood Thinners, then I would venture to say you will not be able to take the enzymes--above.

    Second day of fishing---Doing well off to the Gym to exhaust myself.

    Nalakrats

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