Would 10 of the 45 mg equal 7 of the 65 mg? - Thyroid UK

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Would 10 of the 45 mg equal 7 of the 65 mg?

Katurajo1
Katurajo1

While I am waiting for an answer from my doctor, I figured I would ask you guys if this would work. I was taking 65mg thyroid and 30 mcg Liothyronine for the past year. For some reason last month my doc changed it to 45 mg of thyroid and still 30 mcg of Liothyronine. I am feeling the change and it’s not good. I don’t think he should have changed it because now that I’m looking at my labs, my free t4 was low, so I think odd that he changed it but I’m waiting to see what his reasoning was. All of my other labs were good, within his optimal range. He’s a functional doc by the way, I’m in the US. I won’t be seeing him for at least a few weeks and I don’t want to feel like garbage so let me know if this makes sense. When I total 7 days of 65 mg thyroid it equals 455 mg total. When I divide that by the 45 mg it comes to just over 10. So 10 tablets of the current prescription dose that I have equal 7 tablets of the past prescription, I hope this is making sense. Would it work if I took a total of 10 pills over 7 days to get me back to where I was when I was on the other dose? Basically taking two pills every few days instead of one to bring the levels back up? I won’t do anything until I speak with my doctor but I just wanted to ask if this would work. Thanks in advance!

6 Replies
oldestnewest

What do you mean by '65mg thyroid'? Is that the NDT Thiroyd? Or levo (T4)? If it's T4, then there's no problem with the plan you propose. But if it's NDT, then that is not a good idea.

Presumably, your doctor only looked at your TSH, which is going to be low on 30 mcg T3, and doesn't know enough about thyroid to know that that is OK. Did he at least test your FT3? If not, sack him and find someone else because he's not going to make you well.

Katurajo1
Katurajo1
in reply to greygoose

Yes it is NDT, I meant it is a compounded thyroid, sorry about that. He did test everything, he’s a doctor that is actually really good but this is the first time he’s done something that has made me feel worse. My free T3 is right in the middle of the range. My tsh is basically nothing but my free t4 was low, so isn’t it odd he would lower my dose? Doesn’t seem right to me

greygoose
greygoose
in reply to Katurajo1

Well, seems odd to us, but we don't have doctor-logic. A doctor looks at the TSH, mainly, and if that's low, he panics and has a knee-jerk reaction. You're just going to have to tell him it's not ok, and why.

Katurajo1
Katurajo1
in reply to greygoose

Thank you, I see a lot of people suggesting that bloodwork isn’t helpful with NDT and some docs just use the patients symptoms as a gauge. I think that is what I need, my doctor replied to me that I just need to keep with it a few more weeks until I see him again. Not happy with that answer and I’m considering taking the extra dose to get back to normal. It’s horrible when you’ve gone from 0 to 10 and back to 0 😩

greygoose
greygoose
in reply to Katurajo1

Hmm… that doctor doesn't know much about it, does he. If the reduction in dose makes you feel bad now, it's more likely to get worse, rather than better. But, not sure the alternating doses you're suggesting are going to help. With T3 you need a constant, steady daily dose, not more some days and less on others. You need to get back to your old way of dosing.

Katurajo1
Katurajo1
in reply to greygoose

Yes, agreed on all accounts. I have 30 mcg of the t3 to take everyday, it’s just the lower dose of thyroid that I want to double up on.

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