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Thyroid UK
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Knee Pain Causes

Hi my name is James and I have Hypothyroidism and currently take 125mg of Levothyroxine, last Tuesday I woke up with pain in my chest and back, it was tender to touch by my sternum (Breast Bone) and the bit of bone at the bottom where it meets your tummy, Wednesday morning I was awoken with pain radiating from my thighs in to my knees (sharp throbbing pain). I went to doctors on the Thursday and was diagnosed with Costochondritis and given Co- codamol 30mg with 500mg Paracetamol, I went back to doctors on Monday and the pain in the legs wasn’t easing or stopping, I was told it is a Virus and told to take Tramadol 50mg with 1000mg of Paracetamol = 2 x Tramadol 2 x Paracetamol 4 times daily, I have iced the knee (pain is worse on right knee) and also used heat, when I put in the symptoms in a Google search it comes up with Fibromyalgia, has anyone experienced this sort of thing? There has been no trauma or damage to trigger it, it just came on suddenly last Wednesday, I have asked my GP for X-rays to be done but she doesn’t think it’s structural, just a virus, I never knew a virus could cause this sort of pain, I am still getting the pain even whilst on the medication. Any advice would be greatly appreciated, James

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Are your blood results 'normal'? (Or optimal, i.e TSH around 1). I often had bone pain before my results were good.

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Hi James. This happened to me in exactly the same way. I've been hypo for 30 years having had my thyroid removed. I had nursed my son with flu and was amazed when I didn't get it too. But about 6/7 days after the onset of his illness, like you, I experienced pains radiating up and down my legs, round my back etc - in fact I thought I was having a heart attack. The pain eventually settled in my knees, worse in my right knee. Mr GP said it was auto-immune in nature triggered by the flu virus. The pain was agonising and pain meds were ineffective on the whole. Unfortunately this is on going for me.

You don't say why you are hypo - do you have Hashimotos?

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I have been told by GP after TSH test that I am Hypothyroid but not sure if I have Hashimotos as the tests needed to determine that are not done by my surgery and if I got them done externally my GP would not interpret the results.

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Really? I have no problem having a blood test for Hashimotos antibodies from my GP. I would have thought this was standard practice to determine the cause of you hypothyroidism. This was how my GP came to the conclusion that I have developed autoimmune arthritis. Your experience sounds identical to mine and, if I were you, I would insist on having a blood test for antibodies - at least then you'll know what you're dealing with.

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What tests would I need to ask for Marla? and have you got rid of the pain?

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Not at my surgery, they go by the Gold standard TSH test, asking for other tests to be done is like asking for a bag of Rocking Horse Poop LOL 😂

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Marla how were you treated for Hashimoto's and knee pain? James

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I had my thyroid gland removed because I had large painful nodules but I think that is uncommon and it was over 30 years ago! I think treatment has changed since then.

So far as the knee pain is concerned it was due to a virus - my immune system attacks my body, which is what happened with my Hashimotos because that is an auto immune condition. Perhaps if you Google autoimmune thyroiditis and Hashimotos you will have it explained far more concisely than I can.

Anyway, the only treatment I have received is pain killers and anti-inflammatories. I also had x-ray to establish whether or not I have arthritis which I do. Given that most people have arthritic changes to their knees over time without displaying any symptoms or pain makes the diagnosis meaningless and your doctor is correct that the sudden onset of your pain suggests that it's viral. That's why I said you should be checked for antibodies which will establish if you have an auto immune thyroid disease.

Since the onset of my first bout of pain I have rarely been free if pain. Some days are not too bad, some days are awful. At the moment I'm having a flare-up, am in agony and have been for 4 days. As usual I went to bed ok but was woken up in the night with pain radiating around my left knee. I can barely walk. This will gradually ease off over the course of the next few days. There's no predicting it's trajectory unfortunately. That doesn't mean to say you will have the same experience as me. There is a condition called viral arthritis that comes on suddenly and clears up in the same way that a virus would. Unless your GP does the correct blood tests to establish the exact cause of your thyroid disorder and your sudden onset pain in your knees it's all just guesswork.

The alternative is to have tests privately as Slowdragon has suggested.

I hope you manage to get it sorted out soon.

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I am going to get a FULL test done, including the antibodies, I have been in pain since last Wednesday and the prescribed pain relief is not touching it, I am also struggling to walk, James

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Good luck

Marlene

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Let us know how you get on.

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I will do Marla, thank you for the advice.

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When did you have a Vit D blood test, and what was the lab result and the lab ref. range (it'll be next to the lab result)?

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I haven’t had a Test for vitamin D.

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I'd therefore get Vit D blood test as soon as poss, and be sure to get the printout of lab tests with the ref. ranges. It's your body, your data. When you get the printout, post the lab results with the ref. ranges on this forum if you'd like some feedback.

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Thank you will do.

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And get printout of any other recent lab tests and post them too. I'd also request Vit B12 blood test.

grassrootshealth.net/wp-con...

"Why does GrassrootsHealth recommend having 40-60 ng/ml of vitamin D (25 OH D) as opposed to 50 ng/ml or 60 ng/ml being the lower limit on some of the other vitamin D web sites?"

"GrassrootsHealth has gathered a group of 40 researchers/practitioners who AGREE that at least 40-60 ng/ml is necessary. The key to our public health effort is to have a consistent message, and all 40 members agree that 40 ng/ml is the minimum. There are, as you note, people who think it should be higher. Getting everyone to at least 40 ng/ml is still a major achievement, however! This would solve many of today’s world-wide health problems."

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Just testing TSH is completely inadequate

For full Thyroid evaluation you need TSH, FT4 and FT3 plus both TPO and TG thyroid antibodies tested. Also extremely important to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

Low vitamin levels are extremely common, especially if Thyroid antibodies are raised

Ask GP to test vitamins and thyroid antibodies....or test privately

All thyroid blood tests should ideally be done as early as possible in morning and fasting. Do not take Levothyroxine dose in the 24 hours prior to test, delay and take immediately after blood draw. This gives highest TSH, lowest FT4 and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, best not mentioned to GP or phlebotomist)

Private tests are available. Thousands on here forced to do this as NHS often refuses to test FT3 or antibodies or vitamins

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

Medichecks Thyroid plus ultra vitamin or Blue Horizon Thyroid plus eleven are the most popular choice. DIY finger prick test or option to pay extra for private blood draw. Both companies often have special offers, Medichecks usually have offers on Thursdays, Blue Horizon its more random

If antibodies are high this is Hashimoto's, (also known by medics here in UK more commonly as autoimmune thyroid disease).

About 90% of all hypothyroidism in Uk is due to Hashimoto's. Low vitamins are especially common with Hashimoto's. Food intolerances are very common too, especially gluten. So it's important to get TPO and TG thyroid antibodies tested at least once .

Link about thyroid blood tests

thyroiduk.org/tuk/testing/t...

Link about antibodies and Hashimoto's

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

List of hypothyroid symptoms

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

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Hi James, Just to say, as SlowDragon has indicated above, one test for Hashimoto's may not be enough. A family friend tested negative two, possibly three times before the test showed that she definitely does have Hashimoto's. My Endocrinologist is certain I have Hashi's even though the GP's test came back negative, he seems to ignore the test and go by symptoms and other indicators.

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