I am new to the programme I have a question - Thyroid UK

Thyroid UK
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I am new to the programme I have a question

Mart7469
Mart7469

Good morning one and all. I am 72 years of age and I have had inactive Thyroid for many years (a family trait, both my older sisters have this condition)

This introduction is just like being in Alcoholics anonymous!?

I take 150mg Levothyroxine daily - My question: is there a good diet that any of you can recommend

Unfortunately whilst my sisters maintain their weight I seem to put on pounds, even when I just look at a cake.

In my earlier years I played hockey to a high standard and kept fit

The old arthritis got to me. so two new hips and lower back surgery put paid to my hockey, so until quite recently I played golf around 3 times per week. However, more arthritis and possibly "gout" in little finger (being investigated) is currently restricting that past time

So following this introduction I need any help going with 1/ my weight 2/ does anyone suffer with "trigger finger" and possibly gout in the hand?

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Mart7469
Mart7469
in reply to Hidden

Thank you for the help; I am seeing my GP in the next couple of days and will get the results of my latest bloods

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

Presumably you have Hashimoto's also called autoimmune thyroid disease diagnosed by high thyroid antibodies (especially as your sisters also have it)

Very important to test vitamin levels regularly

Low vitamins are extremely common and can cause symptoms in their own right or affect Thyroid too

For full Thyroid evaluation you need TSH, FT4, FT3 plus TPO and TG thyroid antibodies and also very important to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

All thyroid blood tests should ideally be done as early as possible in morning and fasting. Do not take Levothyroxine dose in the 24 hours prior to test, delay and take immediately after blood draw. This gives highest TSH, lowest FT4 and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, best not mentioned to GP or phlebotomist)

Ask GP to test vitamins or Private tests are available. Thousands on here forced to do this as NHS often refuses to test FT3 or antibodies

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

Medichecks Thyroid plus ultra vitamin or Blue Horizon Thyroid plus eleven are the most popular choice. DIY finger prick test or option to pay extra for private blood draw. Both companies often have special offers, Medichecks usually have offers on Thursdays, Blue Horizon its more random

Arthritis can also actually be improved significantly by gluten free diet. Certainly worth trying

Hashimoto's patients very very often benefit from gluten free diet. Worth Trying it for 2-3 months to see if it helps

According to Izabella Wentz the Thyroid Pharmacist approx 5% with Hashimoto's are coeliac, but over 80% find gluten free diet helps, sometimes significantly. Either due to direct gluten intolerance (no test available) or due to leaky gut and gluten causing molecular mimicry (see Amy Myers link)

Changing to a strictly gluten free diet may help reduce symptoms, help gut heal and slowly lower TPO antibodies

Ideally ask GP for coeliac blood test first

amymyersmd.com/2017/02/3-im...

chriskresser.com/the-gluten...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

scdlifestyle.com/2014/08/th...

drknews.com/changing-your-d...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

If you can add your most recent blood test results and ranges for TSH, FT3 and FT4 if you have them, members can advise

Mart7469
Mart7469
in reply to SlowDragon

Thank you very much for this help; I am seeing my GP in 2 days time and will get the results of my latest bloods

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to Mart7469

Link about gluten and arthritis

arthritis.org/living-with-a...

shaws
shawsAdministrator

When we have blood tests to check the thyroid hormones it always has to be at the very earliest, fasting (you can drink water) and allow a gap of 24 hours between last dose and test and take afterwards.

Others have given good advice and unexplained weight gain is the commonest question as it surprises people in that their diet hasn't changed but weight increases.

Weight gain, if hypothyroid, is due mainly to us not being on a sufficient dose to lower our TSH to 1 or lower and a Free T4 and Free T3 in the upper part of the ranges.The latter two are rarely tested.

Most doctors are happy to keep a patient's TSH when it gets into a range which may be 5 at its highest when it should be 1 or lower, as stated above because that seems to be how the medical profession have been trained. The fact that there are over 91,300 members on this forum shows that not all who are hypo have recovered and are symptom-free and enjoying their life.

Thank you for your help; I am seeing my GP in the next couple of days for the results of my latest bloods

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