Thyroid Antibodies: Hello, In a bid to get to... - Thyroid UK

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Thyroid Antibodies

fran_m
fran_m
β€’27 Replies

Hello,

In a bid to get to the bottom of and understand my symptoms of hypothyroidism, I have now had a test for thyroid peroxidase which has come back with a result of 5.5. Does anybody know whether this is 'normal' or suggests any evidence of a problem...?! I don't know what this means and my doctor had no idea either. πŸ˜”

Any help would be VERY MUCH appreciated as my symptoms are very severe and I'm struggling to get any help or understanding from health professionals!

27 Replies
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You need a range to go with the antibodies, then we can help.

The range on the sheet my doctor showed me said '0-35' but this doesn't seem to correlate with anything I've seen from other people on here and other forums...??

swalls48
swalls48
in reply to fran_m

i need units to help. from my understanding your antibodies should be 0. there is no real healthy range for this. those antibodies are attacking your thyroid. i will assume your level is 5 IU/mL. in US 'healthy' range is 0-0.9 IU/mL so you can see you should really be at 0. mine was 174 IU/mL with TSH of 21 uIU/mL and I had moderate goiter. more info you provide, the more we can help.

fran_m
fran_m
in reply to swalls48

Ok - that's really helpful, thank you. :) I know many have said how important it is for ferritin and vitamin levels etc to be checked - I have had these done and all came back within range apparently, except vitamin B which was high...?? I don't know whether that has any significance...??

greygoose
greygoose
in reply to fran_m

0-35 means that if your antibodies are under 35 then they are negative. Over 35 is positive. Everybody has some antibodies, it's just a question of how many.

However, one negative antibody test does not rule out Hashi's, because antibodies fluctuate, you need at least three tests; also, there are two types of Hashi's antibodies, and the UK only tests one; plus the fact that some Hashi's people never develop high antibodies. They are only diagnosed at a later stage by ultrasound, when some damage has been done.

My Medichecks TPO range is 0-34 so it's probably right; it's in iu/ml. So negative, but there are two thyroid autoimmune antibodies ( other TgAb, thyroglobulin ab). The other could be positive. These antibodies go in peaks and comparative 'troughs' from week to week...so if you think you have symptoms worth checking both again. Presence of these antibodies would show you have Hashimoto's disease .... generally a forerunner to hypothyroidism.

Hidden
Hidden

What are you symptoms.your pulse and temperature and do you have hany previous blood results done by your doctor? You may well be hypothyroid but more information would help us understand better whats going on.

fran_m
fran_m
in reply to Hidden

Hi, thank you so much for your reply. :) My symptoms are chronic fatigue and constant feelings of being unbearably cold - even with the weather being the way it has in the UK lately I have had to wear jumpers and a dressing gown to bed. My heart rate is taken regularly and is usually constant around 50-55bpm. My temperature is also taken daily and is generally 35.5 - 36.5 degrees.

I really appreciate your help and advice. :)

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to fran_m

It is clearly hypothyroidism but whether you can get treatment on the NHS is very much dictated by blood results and I am presuming you have not be considerred by your GPas a result of them falling within what the NHS considers the normal range. You options are really too go private or to self treat which many of us here do.It would be good to see your blood results which you are intitled to a copy of and if they have not been taken recently it might be worth asking your GP to take TSH and T4 and if he can T3 plus ferretin, folate, B12 and Vitamin D allof which are needed for good thyroid function.

On the thyroid uk website there is a list of more helpful doctors available via email.

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to Hidden

Also a lot of people have thyroid issues but do not have antibodys.

fran_m
fran_m
in reply to Hidden

I have had TSH, T3 and T4 taken. Mu doctor said that my TSH was normal and T4 was low but 'within range'. He also said that my T3 came back low and outside of the range at 2.8.

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to fran_m

No offer to treat then.They are all so stuck on TSh which is such an unreliable blood test. I have noticed that anyone who has a T4 low in range is hypothyroid and your t3 could obviously do with some help. With a normal TSh is can be really hard to get treated and then even if you do the treatment is never that great. There is a book by a Dr Peatfeild that you might want to read called something like 'looking after your thyroid'.

You are going to be poorly untill you get some treatment organised. If you doctor was willling to take blood again if you wanted to persue the NHS furthur you could try having some blood taken first thing in the morning before food and wake yourself up at 4am ish with an alarm then go back to sleep the night before. This apparently increases TSH.

fran_m
fran_m
in reply to Hidden

That's really interesting - unfortunately my doctor has refused to run any more blood tests now saying that my results have come back showing no issues. πŸ˜” Have you found then, if you don't mind me asking, that in your experience people in this situation would usually benefit from taking T4 and T3 combined...?? Or simply T3 alone...?? It's a very confusing world with no offer whatsoever of medical help! :(

Hidden
Hidden
in reply to fran_m

I would suggest that actually some levo which just T4 is worth a try, lots of people do very well on it and it is cheap and easier to obtain and easier to dose with.If you have enough Levo and your body converts well to T3 then it should help. Getting thyroid hormones right can be a matter of trial and error and it is often a matter of finding what suits best. My own ideas would be to try levo for a few months and if that does not help try some natural dessiciated thyroid hormone.If that does not suit some levo with T3 and if all else fails some T3 only. You will also need to work on getting your minerals and vitamins up to a level that will support your thyroid ad these are likely to be low from lack of treatment. There is no quick fix I am afraid but well worth it in the end.

No issues? So what is an under range free t3 then?

I know! I asked and he was very dismissive - just said that it's not of concern and doesn't need medication??

Ignorant - that's all.

Hi Fran_m

Are you in the UK? I asked for my daughters antibodies to be tested, due to hairloss, tiredness etc and myself and my mother having hashi's.

The NHS did an antibody test...for GRAVES! Apparently they no longer test for Hashi's on the NHS (although they probably still do if an Endo requests it, but this was the GP).

Are you certain it is peroxidase?

fran_m
fran_m
in reply to PiggySue

Hi, yes I am in the UK - it was definitely peroxidase, but I had to push for that test as my doctor was incredibly reluctant to investigate!

barb62
barb62
in reply to fran_m

I was tested at my NHS GP surgery in March, I did not have to request it

barb62
barb62
in reply to barb62

Sorry TPO and TgAb my TPO was 1006 (0 - 60) Doctor was not going to treat me for a year, just watch? until I stamped my feet and was retested - TSH had shot up so I was prescribed 50 of levothyroxin

Hi there found this the other day which might help understand the situation although you need to sort out those figures as I don't recognise what they mean - mine at plus 500.

kresserinstitute.com/underl...

chriskresser.com/5-thyroid-...

I would also suggest you take 1,000 mg of Vitamin C to help the adrenals.

BW's

A

In itself, I think that a TPO of 5.5 is unlikely to be a problem.

However, it seems there is variation/confusion in absolute TPO limits for thyroidism indications. For example, whilst a reference range widely used e.g. by private company Blue Horizon is 0-35iu/ml, the following are also noted (in increasing order of iu/ml max):

(i) Thyroid UK website; 0.15 (if mUI/ml = mIU/ml!!)

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

(ii) Isabella Wentz; similar at 2.0.

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

(iii) NCBI study; 500 (for moderate risk).

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/276...

(iv) Dr Ruscio; similar figure to (iii).

drruscio.com/thyroid-autoim...

Noting that IW (in ii) uses The Thyroid Event Amsterdam Score to help assess risk of progression into hypothyroidism and a TPO of <100 gives zero risk (if her kU/L = kIU/L).

My own TPO 18 months ago via BH was very similar to yours Fran at 6.0 and so I estimate my risk at low using the Amsterdam Score. I may recheck in future but am encouraged by IW aindication that levels can be reduced e.g. by diet.

Hopefully Ive interpreted the information correctly and that the above detail is helpful.

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

As well as thyroid tests it's very important to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

If any of these are too low, which is common when thyroid is struggling, then low vitamins can lower TSH

Your GP should refer you to endocrinologist for further investigation for central hypothyroidism if FT3 is below range and FT4 at bottom of range

First I would suggest full private testing

For full Thyroid evaluation you need TSH, FT4, TT4, FT3 plus TPO and TG thyroid antibodies and also very important to test vitamin D, folate, ferritin and B12

Private tests are available. Thousands on here forced to do this as NHS often refuses to test FT3 or antibodies

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

Medichecks Thyroid plus ultra vitamin or Blue Horizon Thyroid plus eleven are the most popular choice. DIY finger prick test or option to pay extra for private blood draw. Both companies often have money off offers.

All thyroid tests should ideally be done as early as possible in morning and fasting. This gives highest TSH, lowest FT4 and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, GP will be unaware)

If antibodies are high this is Hashimoto's, (also known by medics here in UK more commonly as autoimmune thyroid disease).

About 90% of all hypothyroidism in Uk is due to Hashimoto's. Low vitamins are especially common with Hashimoto's. Food intolerances are very common too, especially gluten. So it's important to get TPO and TG thyroid antibodies tested at least once .

Come back with results and ranges when been tested

Are you currently taking any vitamin supplements or other medication, if so what

fran_m
fran_m
in reply to SlowDragon

That's incredibly helpful, thank you. πŸ™‚ I did ask my GP to refer me to an endo but he said there was no case to. :s Only thing he suggested was buying some over the counter thyroid supplements from a health food store, but I'm not sure whether that would significantly alter my T3 or T4 levels or make a discernible difference...??

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator
in reply to fran_m

Definitely do NOT take anything that says it is a thyroid supplement. Most contain iodine or kelp and can seriously upset anyone with autoimmune thyroid disease

Getting full private thyroid and vitamin testing is next step

SlowDragon
SlowDragonAdministrator

Meant to add links

drknews.com/iodine-and-hash...

thyroidpharmacist.com/artic...

If you live in Uk iodine deficiency is very rare

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