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Thyroid Hormones Play Role in Sarcopenia and Myopathies

Is it any wonder that those with thyroid disorders report so many musculo-skeletal issues?

Front Physiol. 2018; 9: 560.

Published online 2018 May 23. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2018.00560

PMCID: PMC5992417

Thyroid Hormones Play Role in Sarcopenia and Myopathies

Flavia F. Bloise,* Thamires S. Oliveira, Aline Cordeiro, and Tania M. Ortiga-Carvalho

Abstract

Skeletal muscle maintains posture and enables movement by converting chemical energy into mechanical energy, further contributing to basal energy metabolism. Thyroid hormones (thyroxine, or T4, and triiodothyronine, or T3) participate in contractile function, metabolic processes, myogenesis and regeneration of skeletal muscle. T3 classically modulates gene expression after binding to thyroid hormone nuclear receptors. Thyroid hormone effects depend on nuclear receptor occupancy, which is directly related to intracellular T3 levels. Sarcolemmal thyroid hormone levels are regulated by their transport across the plasma membrane by specific transporters, as well as by the action of deiodinases types 2 and 3, which can activate or inactivate T4 and T3. Thyroid hormone level oscillations have been associated with the worsening of many myopathies such as myasthenia gravis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and rhabdomyolysis. During aging skeletal muscle show a decrease in mass and quality, known as sarcopenia. There is increasing evidence that thyroid hormones could have a role in the sarcopenic process. Therefore, in this review, we aim to discuss the main effects of thyroid hormones in skeletal muscular aging processes and myopathy-related pathologies.

Full paper freely available here:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl...

Sarcopenia is the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass (0.5–1% loss per year after the age of 50), quality, and strength associated with aging.

The myopathies are neuromuscular disorders in which the primary symptom is muscle weakness due to dysfunction of muscle fiber.

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And I just wonder how this impacts on osteoporosis?

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Badly - if I am anything to go by!

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Thanks for posting. No wonder we thyroidies think it is all in our heads when so many things are affected by hypothyroidism. Further proof that T3 is needed by every cell in the body and making me more determined to get some T3 on NHS.

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Oh happy days when I had muscles that felt strong. No matter what I do can't seem to get back what was destroyed by 7 years of levo treatment. I feel it ought to be possible to regenerate but it doesn't seem to want to. Interesting paper.

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I have had some success on NDT

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I’m t3 but muscles haven’t come back.

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That is a shame. I only stuck levo for two years - felt truly dreadful - NDT massive improvement feel almost as good as I did but I fatigue more rapidly and have a plethora of aches and pain I just ignore, they come and go so easier to grin and bear it knowing the lastest annoyance it will soon disappear as mysteriously as it appeared. Sorry you are not progressing on T3 perhaps you need more time?

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