BBC Medical Quiz Show : BBC Two is screening a... - Thyroid UK

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BBC Medical Quiz Show

BBC Two is screening a brand new medical quiz show this summer which pits teaching hospitals from far and wide against each other.

Hosted by Jo Brand the junior doctors will tackle an array of rigorous questions ranging from diagnosing a patient's symptoms, prioritising cases in a mock A+E department and getting stuck in with their chosen specialism.

The makers of the show, Shiver, are looking for patients to take part in the show. They will be required to walk onto the set and give a list of symptoms for the junior doctors to discuss. The doctors will then ask relevant questions to try to guess your condition

The show will celebrate the 70th anniversary of the NHS and it will also raise awareness of the conditions they are discussing.

The conditions they are looking at for this show are hyperthyroidism, Crohn's disease, endometriosis, acute glaucoma, coeliac disease, gallstones, type II diabetes and angina.

Filming will be in the first week of May in central London and all travel expensies will be paid. Refreshments will also be provided.

This is the perfect opportunity to raise awareness of all these conditions so why not think about it. It will be a fun day out!

Applicants must be over 18.

If you are interested contact Shiver via email at jrdocs@shiver.tv or call them: 0207 157 3807

To see more information go to:

bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2018/britains-best-junior-doctors

16 Replies
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I think hypothyroidism diagnosis would be a much more rigorous challenge than hyperthyroidism which has quite specific symptoms.

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I agree but unfortunately, they are not covering hypo this time. I suspect there would be too many conditions with the same symptoms and none of them might get the diagnosis right! :-)

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Quite - how publicly embarrassing (and perversely enlightening) widespread diagnostic failure would be. A really good test of medical nous, or lack of it.

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Not always. There are people with hyperthyroidism who feel cold rather than hot, and who gain weight rather than losing. People tend to focus on the symptoms they find particularly distressing, and may not even have registered others. None of the symptoms are specific to having an overactive thyroid, and as it is considerably less common than an under active thyroid, junior doctors may not have seen many cases

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Do they have enough Hypos or are we being overlooked / they don’t know there’s a difference?

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Unfortunately, they are not covering hypo this time. Once the show is on air, though, it couldn't hurt to write to them and ask them to cover hypo in the next show (if it's a success).

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Well, speaking as a hyper, I’m just glad to see the condition getting any attention at all :) Antithyroids, the most common initial treatment for an overactive thyroid, were introduced in the 1940s, so it feels like time it got a bit more attention .

There would also be a lot less hypOthyroid cases if they found a better second line of treatment for hypER conditions than destroying the thyroid with RAI.

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By choosing hyper rather than hypo I think they have taken the easy way out...but them I'm a cynic when it comes to (many) medics and thyroid issues!

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If they've told everyone which conditions they're looking at, diagnosing them won't be much of a challenge will it ;) :)

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Is it not possible for people who have both Hypo and Hyper? Fairly certain I have read that somewhere?

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It's possible for people to have both types of antibodies so Graves and Hashi's. Awful for them!

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Thanks Lyn, I thought so. I got my DNA recently, and surprisingly showing more Graves defects than Hashi's and Hypo. Whilst it may be that less Hashi's SNPs reported on, I always put the fluctuation, which could present from one extreme to another in an hour, or from day to day, week. to month etc - very erratic, down to Hashi's, I now wonder. As far as I can see I have not had antibodies show for many years. And cannot find out what the original antibodies were. 'Acquired Hypo' noted 10 years later. There is definitely more Hyper in the family than Hypo - diagnosed anyway.

Funnily enough, having been told for decades that my eye problems are not TED, as I have Hypo, not Hyper (I now know 10% of TED caused by Hypo) the Rheumatologist I saw last week, says my eye problem is thyroid related! Wonder if that is why the eye specialist refused to see me the middle of last year.

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And think you are right about the possibility of embarrassing them diogenes. It could be that with Hypo and the T3 situation being a current issue they are reluctant to air it further.

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This could be quite interesting! Any idea when it's going to be screened?

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Just says "the summer" :-)

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Thanks Lyn. I'll keep an eye out for it :)

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