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Thyroid UK
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Don't Understand Why

Last year I had my blood tests done by Blue Horizon and put them on here and was told that I was euthyroid but what has puzzled me is that several years ago my GP sent me to see an endo because my tests were coming out as hyper. After seeing him on several occasions he said my thyroid was not stable as it varied over time from hyper to normal then hypo. I saw a head and neck consultant last July who said that I was slightly hypo. He had an MRI scan done and then sent for me to have an ultrasound scan as they had discovered several nodules and one big one but all benign. The thing is, I have gained a lot of weight, my hair has gone from very thick to being fine and scanty. My nails are brittle and flakey and I always feel tired and have brain fog. I eat a sensible diet with plenty of fruit and veg and I also take a full range of supplements.

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Your previous results didn't show a problem, though your TSH was very slightly under range everything else was good

But it might be worth repeating the tests now. Things can change quite rapidly

Private tests are available

thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

Medichecks Thyroid plus ultra vitamin or Blue Horizon Thyroid plus eleven are the most popular choice. DIY finger prick test or option to pay extra for private blood draw. Both companies often have money off offers.

All thyroid tests should ideally be done as early in morning . This gives highest TSH and most consistent results. (Patient to patient tip, GP will be unaware)

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As you said, SlowDragon, "TSH was very slightly under range everything else was good".

But - I'd question the overall picture. Yes, the FT4 and FT3 and in range and might be OK for some people. But it is a little odd to see a below range TSH with FT4 and FT3 which are not at all high in range.

I agree with retesting.

And, madgewildfire, have you got all the test results your endo based his statement about being unstable on?

Maybe post the supplements you take?

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I take Omega 3, D3, B12, zinc, magnesium glycinate chelate,

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To be clearer, whilst it would be good to post all your supplements, I am specifically thinking about any that contain biotin (vitamin B7). That, taken in supplement doses rather than ordinary dietary intake, can affect many blood test results, including TSH, FT4 and FT3. (Not all versions of the tests are affected. Depends on the precise technique used.)

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Do you think I ought to stop taking all supplements before having a blood test and if so for how long before?

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Possibly - I rather hope someone who knows more of the interactions can dive in here. Anyone?

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Thanks, helvella. I hope someone can advise on this question in more detail but I think perhaps stopping all supplements might be a good idea before having tests done.

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As already pointed out it depends what you are testing what you stop taking.

In the case of biotin it is known to interfere with tests depending on the techniques used, then it's advisable to stop taking any vitamin B complex tablets, any supplement with biotin or vitamin B7 in it around 5 days before any blood test.

Also you should tell any doctors the supplements you are taking. Most will poo poo you at the time but if you have abnormal results they may then ask you again what you are taking to check if it could interfere with the result.

Oh have you ever had your thyroid antibodies tested? And has it been done more than once?

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So stopping supplements seems to be the best plan before the test. Thank you for that.

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If your results have been swinging from hyper to normal to hypo and back again then this suggests you probably have Hashimoto's Disease, also known as autoimmune thyroiditis and other variations on the name - but they are all the same condition.

If this is true then you will have antibodies attacking your thyroid. Unfortunately (for getting an accurate diagnosis), antibody numbers can fluctuate as well as thyroid hormone levels, and some people need several tests before they get a positive result for antibodies. Some people never do get a positive result, but still have Hashi's and it only shows up in scans.

I wrote a long post explaining what Hashi's does in reply to this post :

healthunlocked.com/thyroidu...

Hope you find it helpful.

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Many thanks

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Apparently (according to Izabella Wentz) 20% with Hashimoto’s never have raised antibodies

Your scan showed thyroid is affected with nodules ?

You might have to assume it is Hashimotos

Look at gluten free diet if so

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I gave up when the endo I saw some years ago told me that he didn't know why I was fluctuating and all he said was that he would give me an open appointment if I felt that things were getting worse. I had no faith in him. He just said that these things sometimes happen. I get the feeling that the thyroid is not well understood even by the so-called experts, I see more sense on this website from those who are actually experiencing these problems.

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Lots of endos are diabetes specialists so don't understand more than the very basics about the thyroid.

It is worth trying to find out what every doctor you see specialises in or is interested in before knowing whether bothering you engage with them.

Oh and you can get a list of recommended doctors by emailing thyroid UK.

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Thank you to all who have taken the trouble to reply

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All vitamins/supplements have to be taken 4 hours apart from levo. This is a link which may be helpful:-

livestrong.com/article/4978...

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I discovered quite some time afterwards that the endo I saw was mostly dealing with diabetics so you are right on with that one Bluebug. I will try to suss out one who knows what he/she is doing. Thanks again to all those who have taken the time to respond.

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