Thyroid antibodies

Hi everyone,

Hoping you can help me again. In short I had postpartum thyroiditis 2 years ago after birth of my twins- went hyper, then hypo then stabilised. My dad has hashimotos, is hypothyroid and has been for 20 years. My thyroid swelled up again last September and I've not felt right. Been to gp around March and tsh has been slightly elevated 4.58 (ref range upper limit 4.0). Gp reluctant to do much but I had a thyroid scan and consultant who scanned though I had hashimotos. I've just had my thyroid antibodies test results back, I think TPO and it was 190. GP although said this was positive said she wasn't sure how over the upper limit it is as no reference range present. My tsh has also gone up to 4.65. She doesn't know what to do with me and is referring me to an endo. My question is about antibodies- does this result mean I have hashi's or not as she didn't seem to know/ was reluctant to commit to a diagnosis. I'm keen to maybe start some treatment as I just don't feel right but obviously I have to wait a bit longer now.

Oh and one more question...has anyone else experienced dizziness as a symptom?

Thank you

5 Replies

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  • CRG81 Positive antibodies = Hashimoto's. If your GP doesn't have the reference range, how can she say they are positive? They probably are (I don't know the range for NHS test) but I'm just wondering. And yes, it would be TPO antibodies, NHS tests don't normally include TG antibodies.

    I'll just copy and paste what I've just put in a reply to another post.

    If you look to the right of this page and further up, under Topics, you'll see Hashimoto's which, if you click on it, will take you to lots of posts on the forum about it.

    Hashi's isn't treated, it's the resulting hypothyroidism that is treated. Your antibodies will fluctuate, causing your symptoms and test results to fluctuate, and eventually your thyroid will be destroyed and you'll have full blown hypothyroidism. What you can do to help is go completely and scrupulously gluten free (not a bit or nearly, that won't work) and that helps reduce the antibody attacks. Also, supplementing with selenium helps reduce the attacks.

    Some reading:

    stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

    stopthethyroidmadness.com/h...

    hypothyroidmom.com/hashimot...

  • You have an Autoimmune Thyroid Disease if you have antibodies. It is the commonest of thyroid diseases.

    If you email louise.warvill@thyroiduk.org.uk and ask for a copy of Dr Toft's Pulse Online article in which he states that if antibodies present patients should be prescribed levo to 'nip things in the bud'. You can highlight the answer for your doctor. Dr Toft was President of the BTA. I shall also give you a link re pregnancy triggering thyroid problems and go to the date September 11, 2004 onwards and I think you'll find it helpful.

    We have to read and learn as doctors know very little. Also they've been informed by the guidelines not to prescribe until TSH 10, when other countries do if it reaches around 3. It is so out-of-touch and seems old-fashioned when many on this forum have self-medicated due to necessity and appear to have improved their health.

    thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/testin...

  • Hi CRG81. I have Hashimotos and my results range was anything under 100 was negative and over was positive - mine was in the 300 range. I have found going 100% gluten free really helpful. I'm not 100% reduced symptoms yet but that relates to an under treated hypo state. Try gluten free to begin with. It helps to reduce the antibodies which in turn helps to reduce the attack on the Thyroid gland :-)

  • This is also a link and go down to the heading and I think it's very important:

    High Antibodies but "Normal" TSH, T4, and T3 Levels:

    Should You Undergo Thyroid Hormone Therapy?

    These are clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism (which hashimotos finally becomes).

    thyroiduk.org.uk/tuk/about_...

  • The fact that your dad is hypothyroid could point to a genetic condition: Impaired Sensitivity to Thyroid Hormone (more often known as Thyroid Hormone Resistance). It requires very high T3 levels in the body to overcome the resistance.

    If there are other family members with fibromyalgia, CFS, ME, Coeliac Disease, MS, Heart Disease, thyroid or depression this would further support this.

    It would also be useful to have your Free T3 and Free T4 measured.

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