Gut Health and Thyroid Hormones: I've just put up... - Thyroid UK

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Gut Health and Thyroid Hormones

PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
42 Replies

I've just put up a new blog post on the importance of gut health. You can find it easily on my book Facebook page: facebook.com/recoveringwitht3.

Best wishes,

Paul

You can also use the link: recoveringwitht3.com/blog/t...

42 Replies
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Marz

.....thank you Paul. A few of us on this forum continue to bang the drum with regards to gut health. Your post however, does a great job of giving us concise information. Lets hope it will impact on the many people who have both gut and thyroid issues. Sometimes people want a quick fix and find it difficult to make lifestyle changes....perhaps our guts are out of sight and out of mind !!

I have read the first two books you suggest - and will now consider the third. Both were excellent reads.

2 likes
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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Marz

Yes gut health is central for many (perhaps most) thyroid patients. Even those that remain without obvious digestive system symptoms may still have issues. Keep banging the drum Marz!

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Marz
Marz
in reply to PaulRobinson

.....not forgetting the gut/brain links too ! Generally inflammation in the gut affects everything....I honestly believe that everyone is gluten sensitive without being a coeliac - to a greater or lesser extent. Due to the hybridized wheat that is so different today from the wheat of years ago. Then we have Prof Smiths research on low B12 - gut again mostly - and Alzheimers. Did you listen to The Gluten Summit - A Grain of Truth ?

My posts often mention that having auto-immune thyroid issues is more to do with having an auto-immune illness rather than a thyroid one - just as you mention. I had Crohns diagnosed over 40 years ago - and the Hashimotos in 2005....and so the journey continues !

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Marz

Keep talking about this on whatever forums you are on Marz. It is important stuff!!

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Joyia

Totally agree Paul, gut health is of primary importance, it is a subject few understand let alone our GP's. I have mentioned it to others but too often met with blank uninterested looks, I have come to the conclusion that if it is not a quick fix it goes down like a ton of lead, nevertheless any information that raises awareness and helps to break down incredulity is very positive indeed. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet seems to be leading the way to promote gut health and it would be interesting to hear from others who have been on this regime.

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Joyia

I agree on the blank looks ... changing diet is often seen as a huge hurdle and to be honest it can be hard work. However, thyroid disease is often a disease of the immune system NOT the thyroid gland and so healing the gut and maintaining its health is very important. Thank you for your response Joyia.

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Heloise

Paul, congratulations on your accomplishments. Dr. Walt Stoll had a Bulletin Board website trying to educate people regarding gut health. He recommended books such as The Second Brain and Mind as a Healer, Mind as a Slayer by Pelletier. His 3-legged stool, of whole foods, skilled relaxation, and physical exercise helped many, many of us with chronic health problems. People are very unaware of what damage is being done by the modern diet, very processed food and the overuse of antibiotics. I'm glad someone else is carrying the torch. Dr. Stoll's archives are still on the internet and, as always, no advertising of any sort.

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PaulRobinson

Thanks Heloise. I'm not a gut health torch carrier really. But I know it is key to the health of many thyroid patients. Thanks for the information!

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Heloise

Well, you are opening eyes and minds to taking some responsibility for our own health. As Walt said, it will not be due to what you take but to what you do. He constantly recommended skilled relaxation based on Herbert Benson's book about the Relaxation Response. It is not hard to master but keeping at it can be difficult. You will definitely feel the effects. askwaltstollmd.com/articles...

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PaulRobinson

I agree that the most important first step to recovering your health is to take responsibility for it. So I agree with Dr Walt Stoll that 'what you do' is the most important thing. I hope I understood you right :)

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Heloise

Absolutely correct. Dr. Stoll lost his license over this concept I believe. He practiced medicine in KY for 35 years but I think the NHS mindset is similar to the Kentucky Licensing Board. Strict archaic guidelines never to be tested. Obviously there is a need for drugs, antibiotics and surgery at times but he possibly taught many more people through the internet for many years than through his own practice. He answered every question personally. Very remarkable man.

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PaulRobinson

I can't imagine how he lost his license over it but it does take radicals at some points to help those that can't get help anywhere else.

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Heloise

Very true. I think Dr. Skinner was facing similar ostracism. I hope it didn't push him into an untimely death.

Best wishes to you, Paul, may you achieve all your goals.

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PaulRobinson

I only have one goal in this area and that is to see some positive change in the treatment of thyroid disease.

I have plenty of other life goals but I won't share them here ... much work still needed :) plus some good fortune!

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Hidden
Hidden

I have just read your link to Recovering with T3 with interest Paul, as it is mainly muscular pain that is bugging me at the moment and my GP's answer being ...take paracetamol...does not seem the right answer to me...not something I would want to be continually taking.

I am due to have FT4 and FT3 testing which my Endo has ordered and initialed the form to make sure we get it done....but not due 'til end of Jan ready for seeing him in February.I am hoping this will find some answers for me.

In the meantime I have cut out several food stuffs as much as possible...bread,potatoes,tomatoes and peppers trying to help myself..

Other than that it's a patient waiting game.

I have been reading Mary J Shoman's book on Thyroid Diet,which has given a lot of information too.

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Hidden

Muscular pain is often a sign of insufficient FT3 or too much rT3. Endos often think having FT3 and FT4 and TSH in range is enough. Sometimes it isn't. Good luck!

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to PaulRobinson

Thanks for that Paul.After 11 years of never feeling " normal " I am hopeful that these tests may answer my problems.

I wish you a very happy and healthy New Year.

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Hidden

Often the tests as seen as 'normal' by doctors. Sometimes even a low to midrange FT3 can be a problem. RT3 is rarely measured and even if it is not high it can still be a problem. Blood test results are not everything - please see my many early blog posts on this topic (the ones at the bottom of this list):

recoveringwitht3.com/blog/all

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sarahstevenson

Many thanks Paul - am working on this bit and building gluten free repertoire - Izabella Wentz author and pharmacist advocating the same. Thanks for you summary!

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PaulRobinson

Good work! It is key to good health generally and a healthy immune system and thyroid function. It just isn't my expertise. I don't write about the gut very often as others can do such a better job than me. I usually stick to my knitting and focus on the use of T3. But once in a while I have to mention other very critical aspects. Thanks for your comment Sarah.

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v_adams1

Thanks Paul, that's very interesting.

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PaulRobinson

Thank you!

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marmaris

This is an excellent article Paul. It certainly is my problem I think. I have recently been tested for Coeliac disease and gluten free, but test's came back negative. I also started to have acid reflux. I found that Apple cider vinegar helped this. Also I had come off T4 completely and all these problems started. I am now back on the T4 as mys tsh went to 29 from 0.07 and yes I know not the best indicator. I had gone on T3 only. All my thyroid panels were normal before taking T3 ie TSH Free T4 and Free T4 all in upper levels. Since back on the T4 I am now taking Levo 100mcgs again, and one dose of cynomel am of 12.5. Then when I am retested for bloods I will reevaluate. I know that everyone is different. I have started my blog with T3 as you have advised and will in the new year be putting my story on there for further help. Until then may I thank you for your continued informative information Paul, and wish you all the best for the NEW YEAR 2014.

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marmaris
marmaris
in reply to marmaris

Sorry meant to say free T3 also.

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PaulRobinson

Thanks Marmaris - all the best to you for 2014 also!

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Hidden
Hidden

Paul, Have you read "Great Taste - No Pain"?

I followed the advice and received many emails on the subject, and changed from a burping, pain-ridden invalid to freedom as I am now.

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Hidden

Not heard of that one Kathleen - what diet does it recommend?

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to PaulRobinson

This book is available from TUK library c/o Louise. The main idea is to never eat protein and carbohydrate at the same time. You either eat carbs with vegs or salads, or proteins with vegs or salads. But of course getting all things in over the course of a day. Another big tip is to only ever eat fruit on an empty stomach and leave half an hour before eating anything else. I have followed this and been "cured" and can now tolerate a small potato with a meat meal without any pain.

The method takes a bit of getting used to but it truly works.

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Hidden

Interesting. I'm no expert on diets but it is interesting. I don't think it fits well with the idea of healing a damaged gut due to the difficulty of processing starch when there is already a big imbalance in pathogenic vs good gut flora but it is interesting nevertheless.

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Hidden
Hidden
in reply to PaulRobinson

Google "acid reflux" and you should find "great Taste - No Pain"

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Whiterose

I don't use Facebook, is there any other place I can read your article Paul? Kind regards.

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PaulRobinson

One of the two links is direct to my website and not on Facebook at all Whiterose.

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Whiterose

Thank you.

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PR4NOW

Hey, it is good to see you getting out once in awhile. PR

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to PR4NOW

Time out for good behaviour PR! Even the lunatics get out of the asylum once in a while! :)

To be honest I am focusing most of my effort in my Facebook forum which has grown to nearly 1000 people in a few months. I am spreading the T3 information there and helping people.

I feel I've done enough writing for the moment. With the two books (Recovering with T3 and The CT3M Handbook) I've said pretty much all I want to say. I am hoping that with more and more patients getting well using T3 and sometimes using CT3M for adrenal health recovery then the news will spread and more doctors will become aware that actually a lot can be done with T3 when other treatments have failed. I had a guy from Germany join recently who is seeing who he considers to be the top endo in Germany and his doctor knew who I was, had read Recovering with T3 and was prescribing T3. I'm generally a pessimist but I hope to see more positive change whilst I still work in this area.

I wish you a wonderful, happy and prosperous new year my friend!

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Kitten-whiskers

Hello Paul,

Thank you for more fantastic information. I have got both your books and I think they are brillant, when things get to me I re read them and they give me hope. I have struggled to take any form of Thyroid Medication - even just 5mg twice a week of T3 goes toxic - Is this normal? I have been trying for nearly three years, my health is so poor. I do not have the support of a GP or Endro. I have had stomach trouble for years & years so I am looking forward to reading this.

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PaulRobinson

Sounds like an adrenal saliva test and a full iron panel is in order if you haven't had them done already. In the red book there's a chapter on 20 reasons why thyroid hormone doesn't work well ... there may be some clues there. No its not comment for people to not tolerate T3 but is usually shows that there is another issue.

Good luck!

Paul

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Kitten-whiskers

Thank you Paul,

I did have the saliva test done and I do have Adrenal Issues but can not tolerate Hydrocortisone. I am looking at trying the CT3M next after sorting out my stomach problem. Dr did check Iron - said all was ok but then they always say that.

Best wishes

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Hidden
HiddenAdministrator

Hi PureT3paul

seems Hippocrates was right then!

Good to see you popping up and good to see your success stories.

best wishes Jane :D

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to Hidden

He was right! Thanks Jane! :)

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vajra

Hi Paul, thanks for that. I don't do Facebook and so haven't read the piece - but great to see the central role of gut function being highlighted again. It's such a central issue, but often gets overlooked.

Personal experience plus reading suggests that there's very good reason to think that even moderate hypothyroidism leads to problems with/alterations to gut function, and that with the resulting inflammation it often progresses to auto immune disease (the thyroid is often an early target in the form of Hashimotos etc) and nutrient absorbtion issues which can mess with primary thyroid function and other processes too.

Stress (high blood cortisol levels), food (often gluten) intolerances and especially high carbohydrate and sugar diets trigger similar issues if prolonged/chronic (they cause reductions in the level of T3/increases in the level of reverse T3 in circulation it seems) - and in fact seem also to change the entire metabolic basis on which the body operates to one based on sugars (a natural response that makes what should obnly be short term high energy available - for fight/flight) - which exacerbates the situation.

Imbalances in gut flora caused by this scenario and by antibiotics are another cause of issues - with knock on effects on mood/mental state which also exacerbate the situation.

Not for nothing is the gut (after the mind) sometimes termed to axis of the body, and good gut function as the basis of health…

Pretty incredible too how every imbalance in the body has a direct effect which in turn feeds back to exacerbate the initial problem - realistically we can never look at issues one at a time.

One bit of related personal experience was that despite many years on combined T3 and T4 (but not quite enough T3 to suit my situation) it was only upon getting reasonable control of my cortisol levels and upping the quantity of T3 slightly (thank you for the inspiration) that my gut function returned to normal.

Scary to think that it was in essence only 10mcg extra of T3 that delivered normal gut function (especially since i'd otherwise been feeling pretty well - not hypo beyond being a bit short of stamina) - fine tuning our replacement can really matter...

ian

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PaulRobinson
PaulRobinson
in reply to vajra

There are two links - one isn't facebook. Glad you've made such great progress Ian! :)

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